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Super Duper Sell Off - BJP selling off the country in bits & Parts

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by Paliwal Warrior, Jul 31, 2014.

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  1. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    India: Drumbeat of Demand Pictures: Eleven Nations With Large Fossil-Fuel Subsidies

    A worker heaves a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinder onto a truck in Mumbai, India, where fossil-fuel subsidies weigh heavily on the nation's finances. Without a large network of piped natural gas for cooking, city-dwelling Indians rely on canisters of LPG, which the government provides at deeply subsidized rates.
    Fossil-fuel subsides are more prevalent in countries that export fuel, but India, followed closely by China, has the highest subsidies among importers, totaling $22 billion in 2010.
    A quarter of India's 1.2 billion people live below the poverty line, but here, as in other high-subsidy countries, the government supports are more likely to benefit the rich. An International Institute for Sustainable Development study catalogued how the overwhelming majority of Indians who use LPG as a cooking fuel live in urban areas, with most gas consumed by the well-off. Indian's rural dwellers tend to cook over coal, wood, or dung fires.
    Globally, only 8 percent of fossil-fuel subsidies reached the world's poorest populations, according to the International Energy Agency, which has urged nations to move to direct spending on health and welfare programs that would target the poor more efficiently.
    In 2010, India deregulated the price of gasoline, but public protests over that shift stymied reform. Fearing a public backlash, the government has not raised prices for cooking fuel or diesel since 2011, even though its central bank has urged fuel price increases to improve India's finances and slow energy imports.
     
  2. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    political contributions are legal in india & elsewhere nothing wrong in it

    thats why i used the word - legalised way of bribing for - lobbying
     
  3. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    :facepalm:

    Can u please define subsidy ?

    forget all newspaper reports / can you point out 1 govt press release or communication - govt official - why says the word subsidy
     
  4. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    no links pl post links

    2. thi sis factually wrong report Diesel prices are increased by rs .50/ month are will be deregulated by november 201, infact the monthly 50 paise / ltr increase has been effected today only pl check the news

    3. There is no subsidy on any fuels in india except kerosene
     
  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Fact Sheet: India’s Food Security Bill
    WALL STREET JOURNAL
    [​IMG]
    Reuters
    A laborer shoveled wheat grains at a wholesale market on the outskirts of the northern city of Amritsar May 13.
    Name: The National Food Security Bill, 2013.
    Aim: The primary objective of the bill is to guarantee cheap food grain to nearly 70% of India’s 1.2 billion people. The broader aim is to alleviate chronic hunger and poverty in India.
    Why it’s important: India accounts for a third of the world’s poor, the World Bank said earlier this year.
    Almost half of the country’s children under five are classed as chronically malnourished, and more than a third of Indians aged 15 to 49 are undernourished, according to India’s National Family Health Survey in 2006, the latest data available.
    Who it affects: The bill, if passed, would provide subsidized food grain to 75% of India’s estimated 833 million rural population and 50% of an estimated 377 million urban population.
    Under the program, beneficiaries can get a total of five kilograms of subsidized rice, wheat and coarse grains a month. These can be bought at prices ranging from one to three rupees (approximately two to five U.S. cents) a kilogram, far cheaper than market rates of 20 to 25 rupees.
    How it works: The state-run Food Corporation of India will distribute subsidized grains through a nationwide network of “fair price shops.” In 2011, the latest year for which government data are available, the FCI ran more than 505,000 fair price shops in India.
    Cost: The government says it will spend about $4 billion a year on the program.

    Criticism: The bill has been criticized by opponents of the ruling Congress party and some food security analysts. Many see it as an attempt by the Congress party to woo poor and middle-class voters ahead of federal polls in 2014.
    Analysts also question how the government plans to identify beneficiaries of the program. Under an existing food program, subsidized grain is provided to individuals earning less than the benchmark poverty line, set at 33 rupees (55 cents) a day in urban areas and 27 rupees (45 cents) a day in rural areas. The new bill doesn’t spell out the groups that qualify as beneficiaries or how the government plans to identify them.
    Food security experts have also raised concerns over distributing grains through a state-run channel riddled with irregularities and corruption. Under India’s existing food program, as much as half of the grains procured by the government are siphoned off by middlemen before reaching their intended beneficiaries, according to a report by India’s Planning Commission in 2005. Much of the subsidized food, experts say, ends up being sold illegally in markets rather than in fair price shops
    Some economists also believe the bill would hurt the economy by worsening the fiscal deficit. Government expenditure on social spending widened India’s budget deficit to 5.2% of gross domestic product last financial year.
    What’s next? In July, while Parliament was in recess, India’s cabinet implemented the bill though an “ordinance,” which is similar to an executive order in the U.S.
    For the ordinance to continue as a law, both houses of Parliament must ratify it within six weeks from the start of the next parliamentary session, which in this case, began Monday.
    The ordinance was tabled for discussion in the lower house or Lok Sabha on Monday. If passed, it will be debated in the Rajya Sabha, or the upper house. The ordinance needs to pass with a simple majority in both houses to continue as a law.
     
  6. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Pictures: Eleven Nations With Large Fossil-Fuel Subsidies
     
  7. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Poor in India Starve as Politicians Steal $14.5 Billion of Food
    By Mehul Srivastava and Andrew MacAskill Aug 28, 2012 2:30 PM ET
    228 Comments Email Print

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    [​IMG] Tap for Slideshow
    Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
    52-year-old Ram Kishen with his government provided ration card in Satnapur Village, Uttar Pradesh, India.
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    [​IMG]
    Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
    52-year-old Ram Kishen with his government provided ration card in Satnapur Village, Uttar Pradesh, India. Close
    52-year-old Ram Kishen with his government provided ration card in Satnapur Village, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    [​IMG]
    Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
    Day laborers move sacks of rice at the Uttar Pradesh state warehouse in Mishrikh in Uttar Pradesh, India. Close
    Day laborers move sacks of rice at the Uttar Pradesh state warehouse in Mishrikh in Uttar Pradesh, India.
    [​IMG]
    Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
    A caretaker exits the closed fair price store of Satnapur Village in Uttar Pradesh, India. Close
    A caretaker exits the closed fair price store of Satnapur Village in Uttar Pradesh, India.
    [​IMG]
    Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
    A day laborer walks past piles of covered grains outside the Uttar Pradesh state warehouse in Mishrikh in Uttar Pradesh, India. Close
    A day laborer walks past piles of covered grains outside the Uttar Pradesh state warehouse in Mishrikh in Uttar Pradesh, India.
    [​IMG]
    Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
    Sangathin activist Surbala Vaish in Satnapur Village, Uttar Pradesh, India. Close
    Sangathin activist Surbala Vaish in Satnapur Village, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    [​IMG]
    Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
    Locally elected politician Anoop Gupta in Sitapur, Uttar Pradesh, India. Close
    Locally elected politician Anoop Gupta in Sitapur, Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Ram Kishen, 52, half-blind and half- starved, holds in his gnarled hands the reason for his hunger: a tattered card entitling him to subsidized rations that now serves as a symbol of India’s biggest food heist.
    Kishen has had nothing from the village shop for 15 months. Yet 20 minutes’ drive from Satnapur, past bone-dry fields and tiny hamlets where children with distended bellies play, a government storage facility five football fields long bulges with wheat and rice. By law, those 57,000 tons of food are meant for Kishen and the 105 other households in Satnapur with ration books. They’re meant for some of the 350 million families living below India’s poverty line of 50 cents a day.
    Instead, as much as $14.5 billion in food was looted by corrupt politicians and their criminal syndicates over the past decade in Kishen’s home state of Uttar Pradesh alone, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The theft blunted the country’s only weapon against widespread starvation -- a five-decade-old public distribution system that has failed to deliver record harvests to the plates of India’s hungriest.
    “This is the most mean-spirited, ruthlessly executed corruption because it hits the poorest and most vulnerable in society,” said Naresh Saxena, who, as a commissioner to the nation’s Supreme Court, monitors hunger-based programs across the country. “What I find even more shocking is the lack of willingness in trying to stop it.” Poor in India Starve as Politicians Steal $14.5 Billion of Food - Bloomberg
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Indian poor starve while grain rots in depots
    Published time: August 31, 2010 11:02
    Edited time: August 31, 2010 11:02
    Indian poor starve while grain rots in depots — RT News
    Tags
    Children, Health, India, Scandal
    India is home to one quarter of the world's starving population and one third of its malnourished children while, at the same time, maintaining a surplus of food grain in government storage areas.
    In the village of Danapur in Eastern India, villager Rita says she has had nothing to feed her son for four days.
    “My hungry child cries all the time, there is no food to feed him. How can we survive like this? To keep the child quiet I make him drink water,” Rita says.
    Yet the government has record amounts of surplus stocks: 59 million tons of wheat and rice. It does have a huge public distribution system that provides free food to families below the poverty line. But corruption and complex bureaucracy means the poorest of the poor often don't make it onto the list.
    “We are poor people and are desperate for food to eat. Our children go to sleep hungry. Our names are not on the government’s poverty list and we don’t get any food grain from the government. We can we do?” questions labourer Jugari Paswan. “Ultimately we will have no choice but to commit suicide.”
    With people starving, the recent images of piles of wheat rotting at a storage facility erupted into a major political issue. In the state of Punjab, it was discovered that 49,000 tons of food grain had perished.
    Subhash Zadoo , the General Manager of Food Corporation of India based in Delhi, explains that “Despite FCI taking precautions, there is every likelihood, as we have in a household, that whenever you are pouring a cup of tea from a kettle, that two spoons can spill over on the table. And if you see a thumb rule in FCI, vis-à-vis the total food grain which we handle, our losses – they are not in that huge abundance.”
    In the largest food storage depot in the capital New Delhi, grain is safe in permanent warehouses with fixed roofs. But when it is stored temporarily with just a plastic cover to keep out the rain, it can last only one year. And with the government keeping 17 million tons of wheat and rice stored like this because it doesn’t have enough permanent warehouses, the scale of the problem becomes apparent.
    Experts say about 10 million tons – enough to feed 140 million people for a month – has been stored during at least one monsoon and is at risk of rotting. If this grain were released instead, it could help those most in need. But distributing it would cost US$1 billion, and the government cannot afford to add it to its food subsidy.
    That does not come as good news for Rakesh Kumar and his family, who depend on the handouts.
    “We cannot afford to buy rice for our family. Whatever food grain the government has, it is allowing it to rot in its warehouses,” Rakesh Kumar grieves. “The ration cards they issue don’t reach the actual poor. Whatever rice is distributed to the local dealer for us, is instead sold by him in the open market.”
    With global wheat prices rising due to the drought in Russia, if India loses its wheat stocks to poor storage this could fuel the price surge and that would hit the poor in India the hardest.
     
  10. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Nice Avatar
     
    Averageamerican likes this.
  11. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Has eNREGA finally found its way to defence sites and forums?

    Seems so
     
  12. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Jhadoo chalani wali aurat kay betay haath main jhadoo hee uthatay hain

    gong by ths logc

    eek chawle ka betay kya karta ha ... srf cha bechta hai kya

    lets discuss issue in a mature way see my tweets as under ...

    [​IMG] Paliwal_Warrior @paliwal_w · 4h
    Why should aMPs MLAs get free Land Plot allotments ? They can get official residences till their term why LANDPLOT allotments ?

    [​IMG] Paliwal_Warrior @paliwal_w · 4h
    Are the pensions of MPs MLAs defined benefit tyoe or Defined contribution type ? What service they are doing to nation?

    [​IMG] Paliwal_Warrior @paliwal_w · 4h
    Why should the MPs MLAs get lifetime pension even if they become MP MLA for 1 day ?

    [​IMG] Paliwal_Warrior @paliwal_w · 4h
    if the MPs MLAs are convicted iin any cases - criminal corruption does our law have provisions to stop thier benefits ?

    if and when the Modi Govt address these issues or revisits the crcular & make the changes i will support them on those issues
     
  13. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    HAHAHA

    let me 1st point out the discrepances in this report and call out un-understood reporting

    1st The aim of this bill is Nutritional Security not Food security as has been wrongly reported and misunderstood & not clarfied by the govt also
     
  14. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Yes there is a problem, we acknowledge it, understand it and are working on it

    see we are aware about it not only that roughly 30% of fruts produce of india (30% which s equal to the whole yearly consumption of EU combined) goes to waste every year

    See the Indians in general have no issues in calling spade a spade, it is always the Yumrikees who are like - Myan gire to gire lekin tangdi phr bhi Unchi
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  15. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    @Paliwal Warrior, You using an avataar of Parshuram is against Brahmanism. I hope you know that Lord Parsuhram had no children and only Brahmins who can use his avataar are Bhardwaaj, Tyagi and Bhumihaar. and among them only Bhardwaaj can display his Pharsa as a symbol as he gave it to us. Thats why I display it.
     
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