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Super e-way to link Delhi, Jaipur

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by Domain, Mar 21, 2017.

  1. Domain

    Domain Developers Guild Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    GURUGRAM: The land acquisition process has started for a new 'super expressway' the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) is building between Delhi and Jaipur that will reduce the distance between the two cities by around 40 km.

    The new speedway will, however, not originate in Delhi. It will branch out from the Delhi-Gurgaon expressway near the Kherki Daula toll plaza in Gurgaon and pass through seven districts before terminating at the Rajasthan capital. Its total length will be 195km, as opposed to around 235km that one needs to travel to get to Jaipur from the same point, with a main carriageway of six lanes (three on each side). The road, officials said, will be fully access-controlled.

    It is, however, unlikely to bring the commuting time between Gurgaon and Jaipur down to 90 minutes+ , as Union road transport and highways minister Nitin Gadkari had recently said while speaking of this 'super expressway' but will still cut by half or more the total commuting time to the Pink City. Officials said the 'super expressway' would make the Gurgaon-Jaipur journey possible in 120 minutes, which will be a feat no less remarkable, since at present, the journey takes anywhere between four and five hours, or even more if there is heavy traffic.


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    The earlier plan was for a 226km greenfield expressway starting near the Indira Gandhi International airport and terminating at Daulatpura in Jaipur. But the route was modified because of the cost factor. The expressway will now terminate at Chandwaji in Jaipur district. The new alignment has brought down its land requirement from 2,800 hectares to 1755.90 hectares.


    According to documents submitted by the Union environment ministry's expert appraisal committee (EAC) for infrastructure projects, the 'super expressway' is expected to cost of Rs 6,530 crore to build. Its rehabilitation and resettlement cost is also a sizable Rs 5,000 crore as most of the land that needs to be acquired for the project is privately owned.




    "Land has been identified and the acquisition process has been initiated. There are two sections of the project in Haryana and Rajasthan. The acquisition process has started on the Haryana side," said Ashok Sharma, project director, NHAI.


    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...km-long-have-6-lanes/articleshow/57741963.cms
     
  2. SR-91

    SR-91 FULL MEMBER

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    This is just waste of money (atleast for now) and resources. They are spending 12000 crore to save only 40km of travel.??? WTF??
    There are many more roads that need more attention, they should've done this project alot later.
    OR
    Expand the existing highway into six or 8 lanes and allow to travel with higher speed limit.
     
  3. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    No, connectivity between capitals is very important. It has both economic value, and since it's close to the border, it has military value as well.
     
  4. SR-91

    SR-91 FULL MEMBER

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    All you want to know about plastic currency notes.

    India could soon see its first currency note printed on plastic instead of paper. Here is more information about it.

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    The Rs10 notes would be the first ones in India which would be printed on plastic instead of paper.

    Everybody has lost money, due to currency notes being washed along with dirty laundry. The washing machine, however, may no longer be able to eat your money. Arjun Ram Meghwal, minister of state for finance, recently told Lok Sabha that “it has been decided to conduct a field trial with plastic banknotes at five locations of the country. Approvals for procurement of plastic substrate and printing bank notes of Rs10 denomination on plastic substrate have been conveyed to the RBI (Reserve Bank of India).” Let’s know more about these notes.

    Advantages
    “Plastic banknotes are expected to last longer than cotton substrate-based banknotes,” said Meghwal, and added, “Central banks across the world have been exploring different solutions for extending the lifecycle of banknotes. These include introduction of plastic banknotes.” The pioneer in plastic notes is Australia, which started using them in January 1988.

    Since then, they have been circulating in countries like New Zealand, Canada, Scotland, Vietnam, Brunei and Papua New Guinea. Bank of England started circulating plastic-based notes of £5 on 13 September 2016. It plans to issue £10 plastic notes from September 2017 and £20 notes by 2020. The bank estimates that these notes last up to 2.5 times longer than paper-based notes. In the long run, polymer notes are expected to reduce expenses incurred on printing currency, as they last longer. According to the Reserve Bank of India, the total expenditure incurred on security printing stood at Rs3,420 crore during 2015-16 (July-June) and Rs3,760 billion during 2014-15.

    Challenges
    Changing currency notes can be tricky, because we first need to upgrade the entire infrastructure. We recently saw some of these issues crop up, when ATMs had to be recalibrated because they could not handle the new currency notes introduced after demonetization.

    Also, it needs to be seen how these notes will perform in India, which experiences extremes of weather. It is reasonable to ask whether the plastic notes would be able to withstand the extreme heat of India. This is why the trial of plastic notes is expected to be conducted in five cities— Kochi, Mysuru, Shimla, Jaipur and Bhubaneswar—which are in different climatic zones. If the trial run is successful, we may see more plastic notes.
     

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