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The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure Annually

Discussion in 'Modern Warfare' started by sunny_10, Jun 15, 2012.

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  1. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    List of main battle tanks by country as of 2009

    United States:- 8,000 M1A1/2/2SEP

    Russia:- 300 T-90, 4,744 T-80, 7,144 T-72, 4,000 T-64, 689 T-62, 1,200 T-54/55

    China:- ~500 Type 99, Type 98, 2,500 Type 96, Type 90-IIM, Type 90, 500 Type 88, Type 85, Type 80

    India:- 310+ T-90, 2,200 T-72, Orders capped at 124 Arjun MBT, 755 T-55, 500 PT-76

    List of main battle tanks by country - Military Power
     
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  2. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Combat aircraft by country

    Country - Fighters - Bombers - Attack

    1: USA -- 3,043 -- 171 -- 1,185
    2: Russia - 1,264 -- 166 -- 1,267
    3: China -- 1,130 -- 118 -- 370
    4: India --- 901 --- 91 --- 220

    List of countries by level of military equipment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    =>
     
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  3. sunny_10

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    India’s new Navy chief pilots ‘blue-water’ strategy
    2012-09-27

    India’s new Navy chief sits at the helm of an emergent, “blue-water navy” strategically positioning the country’s stated aspirations to command a dominant role in the Indian Ocean.

    Admiral Devendra Kumar Joshi, 58, replaced retiring Navy chief Admiral Nirmal Kumar Verma on Aug. 31. India’s Navy has 123 ships and 11 submarines.

    Blue-water navy refers to the ability to exercise sea control at wide ranges. Specifically, the term describes a “maritime force capable of sustained operation across open oceans, project power from the home country and usually includes one or more aircraft carriers,” according to U.S. Defense Security.

    Naval build up expected

    A total of 46 new war ships and submarines are under construction and about 15 are expected to be added to the fleet during Joshi’s three-year tenure. :tup:

    Projects slated for the next three years include a Russian-built aircraft carrier, U.S.-built long-range reconnaissance planes, an indigenous nuclear-powered submarine under construction, and a dedicated naval satellite.

    The new ships and submarines will add to India’s presence as a maritime power and reinforce its capabilities on the high seas.

    India’s maritime activity is gaining world recognition, marking the period as the country’s biggest naval power increase since independence from Britain in 1947.

    Visiting India in June, U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta said, “In terms of regional security, our vision is a peaceful Indian Ocean region supported by growing Indian capabilities.

    “India is one of the largest and most dynamic countries in the region. … India is at the crossroads of Asia, the crossroads of the new global economy, and at the crossroads of regional security. We will stand with India at those crossroads.”

    Developments during Joshi’s tenure will be watched from both sides of the Pacific Ocean.

    Anti-submarine warfare specialist at the helm

    Joshi, who was commissioned in 1974, is the 21st chief of the Navy since the country’s independence. He is a specialist in anti-submarine warfare and has served in command, staff and instructional appointments.

    His experience includes a stint in warship production and acquisition as the assistant controller of the Aircraft Carrier Program [ACCP]. He then worked at the “Operations Branch,” first as an assistant chief of naval staff [Information Warfare and Operations] and then as deputy chief of naval staff. Notably, Joshi has been the commander-in-chief of the Andaman and Nicobar Command, the only tri-service integrated command in India.

    He went on to serve as the chief of Integrated Defence Staff and was the Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the Western Naval Command at Mumbai. He served as the defense adviser in the Indian High Commission at Singapore from 1996 to 1999.

    A native of Dehradun in the northern state of Uttarakhand, Joshi studied at Hansraj College in New Delhi. He graduated from the U.S. Naval War College in Rhode Island and attended the National Defense College in New Delhi.

    Joshi is requesting not only changes to hardware, but infrastructure as well, saying, “We would need to professionally re-audit, train and consolidate preparedness.”

    Overall expansion plan

    In addition to the 46 ships under construction, “acceptance of necessity” for 49 more ships and submarines has been approved by the Indian government. The vessels under construction include an aircraft carrier to be constructed in India along with destroyers, corvettes and six submarines to be constructed in France.

    The first to be added to the fleet will be new warships of the existing “Delhi Class” destroyers, starting early next year. The ships feature improved stealth features and weapons. Also under construction are eight new landing craft utility [LCUs] vessels, used in amphibious warfare to augment the fleet in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Bay of Bengal.

    The Navy commissioned 15 ships in the past three years, including four stealth frigates, two fleet tankers and eight water jet fast attack craft [WJFAC]. Future plans include a deep submergence and rescue vessel [DSRV], six additional submarines, four Landing Platform Docks and 16 shallow-water anti-submarine warfare [ASW] ships. :tup:

    Last month the Navy issued a request for proposals [RFP] to acquire 56 naval utility helicopters customized for surveillance, anti-submarine warfare, anti-terror, electronic intelligence gathering and search-and-rescue operations. The RFP, which may result in U.S. $1 billion in purchases, has been sent to leading U.S., European and Russian helicopter makers. The Navy has more than 100 helicopters.

    Another aircraft carrier on sea trial

    India is set to be a two-carrier Navy at the end of the year. [China will catch up soon with one aircraft carrier constructed in Ukraine and undergoing sea trials.] India’s new carrier is a refitted Russian craft previously named Admiral Gorshkov. Renamed Indian Naval Ship [INS] Vikramaditya, the vessel has gone through a U.S. $2.35 billion refit program and will have Russian-built MiG 29K fighters flying off its deck. The 49,130-ton carrier started a four-month sea trial in June in the Barents Sea and is slated to join the fleet by the end of the year.

    The other carrier, the INS Viraat, is set to be phased out by 2017 and replaced by another carrier being built at a state-owned shipyard in Kochi, Kerala, on India’s western seaboard.

    Meanwhile, India says the INS Arihant, “the slayer of enemies,” will be sea-launched soon. The 6,614-ton nuclear submarine will provide second-strike capability in response to a potential initial enemy nuclear strike. Modeled on the Russian Akula class submarine design, the Arihant is being constructed at Vishakapatnam on the east coast of India.

    At an August news conference, Verma, the then-navy chief, said: “Arihant is steadily progressing towards operationalization, and we hope to commence sea trials in the coming months. … Navy is poised to complete the [nuclear] triad, and our maritime and nuclear doctrines will then be aligned to ensure our nuclear insurance comes from the sea.”

    Long-range reconnaissance aircraft

    In November 2008 terrorists used the sea route to reach Mumbai on India’s west coast to launch an attack, killing 166 people. In response, the Indian government approved the purchase of 12 long-range reconnaissance planes, the P-8I, produced by Boeing. The first is slated to arrive in January 2013. India operates the Russian origin IL-38 and the Tupelov-142 for long-range reconnaissance at sea.

    The P-8I will provide real-time information and can be deployed in locations such as the Indian Naval Air Station, INS Baaz also known as “the Hawk.” The P-8I will provide constant updates on the Strait of Malacca and also the “six degree channel” – the main shipping channel between the Indian and Pacific oceans.

    The Strait is an important link between European markets and oil in the Gulf on one side, and China, Japan and Korea on the other side. Nearly 70,000 vessels pass through the Strait annually – about 40 percent of all global trade. :coffee:

    In conjunction with the Indian Space Research Organization, the Navy is slated to launch a communications satellite that will provide communications among all its warships, helicopters, aircraft and submarines.

    INDIA’S NEW NAVY CHIEF PILOTS ‘BLUE-WATER’ STRATEGY - Asia Pacific Defense Forum in English
     
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  4. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    List of aircraft carriers in service in Asia by 2011

    Country - Navy - In service - In reserve - Under construction

    India -- Indian Navy -- 1 -- 0 -- 2

    China - PLA Navy -- 1 -- 0 -- 2

    Thailand -- RTN -- 1


    List of aircraft carriers in service - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    => INS Vikramaditya to be delivered at the end of 2013

    defence eXpress: INS Vikramaditya to be delivered at the end of 2013

     
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  5. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Major Indian Missiles

    (along with Rassuian, Israeli and Western Missiles/ Air Defence Systems)


    . BrahMos

    [​IMG]
    BrahMos is the world's fastest cruise missile.

    BrahMos (Hindi:ब्रह्मोस, Russian: Брамос) is a stealth supersonic cruise missile that can be launched from submarines, ships, aircraft or land. It is a joint venture between Republic of India's Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Russian Federation's NPO Mashinostroeyenia who have together formed BrahMos Aerospace Private Limited. The name BrahMos is a portmanteau formed from the names of two rivers, the Brahmaputra of India and the Moskva of Russia.

    It is the world's fastest cruise missile in operation. The missile travels at speeds of Mach 2.8 to 3.0.[4] The land launched and ship launched versions are already in service with air launched and submarine launched versions currently under testing phase.[5] An Air launched variant of Brahmos is planned which is expected to come out in 2012 and will make India the only country with supersonic cruise missiles in their army, navy, and air force.[6] A hypersonic version of the missile is also presently under development with speed of Mach 7 to boost aerial fast strike capability.[7][8] . It is expected to be ready for testing by 2017.[9]


    . Shaurya (missile)

    [​IMG]

    The Shaurya missile (Sanskrit: Valour) is a canister launched hypersonic surface-to-surface tactical missile developed by the Indian Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) for use by the Indian Armed Forces. It has a range of between 750 to 1900 km [5] and is capable of carrying a payload of one ton conventional or nuclear warhead.[8] It gives the potential to strike in the short-intermediate range against any adversary.[9] [3]


    . Agni-V

    [​IMG]

    Agni-V is an intercontinental ballistic missile developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) of India. It is part of the Agni series of missiles, one of the missile systems under the original Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme. According to DRDO chief, the exact range of Agni V is "classified"[10] but afterwards he described Agni V as a missile with a range of 5,500-5,800 km.[3]


    . Nag (missile)

    [​IMG]

    Nag (Sanskrit: नाग, Nāg "Cobra") is a third generation "Fire-and-forget" anti-tank missile developed in India. It is one of five missile systems developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) under the Integrated Guided Missile Development Program (IGMDP). Nag has been developed at a cost of 300 crore (US$54.6 million).[2]


    . Advanced Light Torpedo (TAL) Shyena is the first indigenous new-generation light-weight torpedo of India, developed by Naval Science and Technological Laboratory of the DRDO for the Indian Navy.[1][2

    It is designed to be capable of launching from both a helicopter or from a triple-tube launcher on surface vessels. Its key design feature are maneuverability and ability to transition from warm to cold medium to ensure a hunt and kill.[1][2] The development period of the missile was quite long, starting in the 1990s, and was inducted into the Indian Navy on March 3, 2012, when the Indian Defence Minister A.K. Antony handed over the first consignment of TAL to the Navy in Hyderabad in March 3.[2]


    . Sudarshan is a Indian laser-guided bomb kit, developed by Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE), a DRDO lab with technological support from another DRDO lab Instruments Research and Development Establishment (IRDE), Dehradun,[1] for the Indian Air Force (IAF).[2][3][4] The announcement of this development was covered extensively by the Indian media.[5][6][7][8]


    . Akash (missile)

    [​IMG]

    Akash (Sanskrit: आकाश Ākāś "Sky") is a medium-range mobile surface-to-air missile defense system developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), Ordnance Factories Board and Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) in India.[2][3][4] The missile system can target aircraft up to 30 km away, at altitudes up to 18,000 m.[5] A nuclear warhead could potentially give the missile the capability to destroy both aircraft and warheads from ballistic missiles.[6][7][8] It is in operational service with the Indian Army and the Indian Air Force.


    . Indian Ballistic Missile Defence Programme

    [​IMG]

    The Indian Ballistic Missile Defence Programme is an initiative to develop and deploy a multi-layered ballistic missile defense system to protect India from ballistic missile attacks.[1][2]
    Introduced in light of the ballistic missile threat from Pakistan,[3] it is a double-tiered system consisting of two interceptor missiles, namely the Prithvi Air Defence (PAD) missile for high altitude interception, and the Advanced Air Defence (AAD) Missile for lower altitude interception. The two-tiered shield should be able to intercept any incoming missile launched 5,000 kilometers away.[4]
    PAD was tested in November 2006, followed by AAD in December 2007. With the test of the PAD missile, India became the fourth country to have successfully developed an Anti-ballistic missile system, after United States, Russia and Israel.[5] :tup: On March 6, 2009, India again successfully tested its missile defense shield, during which an incoming "enemy" missile was intercepted at an altitude of 75 km.[6]

    According to scientist V. K. Saraswat of DRDO the missiles will work in tandem to ensure a hit probability of 99.8 percent. :tup:

    Indian Ballistic Missile Defence Programme - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    . Astra (Sanskrit: अस्त्र, Astra "Weapon") is an active radar homing beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile (BVRAAM) developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), India. Astra is designed to be capable of engaging targets at varying range and altitudes allowing for engagement of both short-range targets (up to 20 km) and long-range targets (up to 80 km) using alternative propulsion modes.[3] As of May 2011, the missile is undergoing developmental trials.[1]


    . Prithvi

    [​IMG]

    Prithvi (Sanskrit: पृथ्वी, pṛthvī "Earth") is a tactical surface-to-surface short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) developed by DRDO of India under the Integrated Guided Missile Development Program.
    5,600 kg (Prithvi III). The missile can carry a 1,000 kg warhead to a distance of 350 km and a 500 kg warhead to a distance of 600 kilometres and a 250 kilogram warhead up to a distance of 750 kilometres.


    . Prahaar (missile)
    Prahaar (Sanskrit:प्रहार, Strike) is a solid-fuelled surface-to-surface guided short-range tactical ballistic missile by DRDO of India. It would be equipped with omni-directional warheads and could be used for hitting both tactical and strategic targets.[2]
     
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  6. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    The latest calculation of Military Strength by GFP is as below, in terms of PwrIndx. PwrIndx at '0' means for a complete control over the world. it is one of the most recognized source of measuring military strength of world so we may have a look on it :coffee:

    Global Firepower Military Ranks - 2013

    few senior members here would be agree with me that US was having PwrIndx at around '0.11' in 2005, sometimes around it if I remember. while its now '0.2461'? so sharp change in just 6-7 years, along with twice indebted economy and having lost most of the technological superiority ::tsk:


    => along with US+EU report as below,

    The Hindu : News : U.S. report says India third most powerful nation
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
  7. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    [​IMG]
    i remember above news we had till 2008/09, but I remember that Super Hornets delivered to Australia since 2010 was then considered as the most advanced version of Aircraft ever exported as it has AESA radar etc., hence replacing SU30mki on the number 2 this way......

    but again we find SU30mki being upgraded to 'Super Sukhoi' standard which will also have AESA radar, with high end stealth characteristics etc, which would again make the SU30mki, the most advanced version of Combat Aircraft ever exported....:tup:

    but I saw many defence experts don't give a cent to the aircraft like Super Hornet, as compare to SU30mki or F15 delivered to Saudi Arabia or Eurofighter Typhoon itself, as, its the aircraft which is of comparison, not their upgraded functions like AESA radar etc. we also have news that Saudi Arabia is going to upgrade its F15s, and same as Eurofighter would get AESA radar etc from 2015 onward, hopefully, making its European owner in this same category too........ :coffee:
     
  8. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    here we can see that SIPRI has updated Indian defence budget on PPP for 2012 at around $117billions now.

    The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure in 2011 (table) — www.sipri.org

    with that we can analyze it by ourselves too as below:

    India’s Defence Budget 2012-13 | Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses

    here, Capital expenditure is Rs 80000 crores this year. That roughly comes up to $15Billion today. Out of which 70% is used for import. That makes it around $10Billion. So, our PPP calculations can directly be used for the rest of the budget.

    However, a significant aspect of our capital expenditure involves license production within India. So, quite a bit of that amount directly comes back to India to HAL, BEML, OFB, HVF and other manufacturers. Eg are T-90, MKI, Hawk etc which are big ticket deals. So, this is again calculated in PPP....... Apart from that, offset clause implies a significant amount of the capital expenditure, at least 30%, comes back to India in the form of investment. :tup:

    So, , out of total $36billion Indian Defence expenditure on exchange rate terms, even if we consider half of this amount for imported arms, ($10 billions), comes back to India in some form or the other, (actually much more), we can calculate PPP figures for at least 90% of our Defence budget. ie, at least around $105 billions on PPP ..............

    Considering that, the table is pretty okay. Maybe we can say it is a little above Russia's budget. :coffee:
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  9. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Why Has India Become the World’s Top Arms Buyer?

    India has replaced China as the world’s largest arms buyer, accounting for 10 percent of all arms purchases during the past five years, a Swedish research group said.

    India purchased some $12.7 billion in arms, 80 percent of that from Russia, during 2007-2011, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). China’s arms purchases during that time were $6.3 billion, 78 percent of which came from Russia.

    India has tried, but failed, to create a sizable domestic manufacturing industry for weapons or even basic military goods, while China has increased production of defense supplies. About 75 percent of India’s weapons purchases came from imports during 2007-11, said Laxman Kumar Behra of the Institute of Defense Studies and Analysis, a government-funded research organization.

    Some analysts in India attribute the failure to create a domestic defense industry to government involvement. “India’s public sector is very inefficient and the private sector is by and large kept out of arms production,” Mr. Behra said.

    “We lack long-term vision,” and a culture of research and development, Mr. Behra said. “The government keeps on forming one committee after the other but there is hardly any implementation” of the committee’s recommendations, he said.

    In a recent article in The Economic Times, Uday Bhaskar, a retired commodore and leading strategic analyst, also criticized India’s weapons procurement policy.

    “More than 60 years after becoming a republic and 50 years after the debacle with China, the opaque Indian defense production establishment does not produce high quality clothing and personal inventory items like boots, let alone a suitable rifle for a one million army, or tanks and aircraft.”

    Russia, the world’s No. 2 weapons supplier in recent years after the United States, sold $7.8 billion in defense supplies in 2011, and $40.8 billion from 2005 to 2011. India bought about one-third of the supplies.

    India’s dependence on Russia is a holdover from the Cold War era, when the two were close allies.

    South Korea was the second-largest arms importer from 2007 to 2011, with $7 billion in purchases. Pakistan and China followed, each accounting for about 5 percent of the world’s total arms import during the five-year period, SIPRI said.

    India’s import of major weapons increased by 38 percent from the 2002-2006 period to the 2007-2011 period. India’s main acquisitions over the past five years were 120 Sukhoi and 16 MiG-29 jet fighter aircraft from Russia and 20 Anglo-French Jaguar fighters.

    India recently finalized a deal for 126 multi-role fighter aircraft with French defense contractor Rafael, in a deal worth $10 billion.

    Why Has India Become the World's Top Arms Buyer? - NYTimes.com

     
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  10. criminally bad

    criminally bad BANNED BANNED

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    with a big size economy our imports is high....of-course our domestic arms industry must be improved but if you are talking largest importer... when you comparing us with your small size economy yes we are largest importer as our needs is big.

    Source: Why Has India Become the World’s Top Arms Buyer?
    Probably because we have China on one side and Pakistan on the other, both of whom we have fought wars against.

    Source: Why Has India Become the World’s Top Arms Buyer?
     
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  11. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    When a light is about to be off, it produces bit more light at the end

    Bujhate Diye Ki Dhadhak

    this Defence Budget Estimate of India at 1.9% of GDP has a unique meaning as compare to US & EU we find. as stated above, defence budget of US is around $700bil (4.5% of its GDP) and it may only go down from here, like how it is estimated at around $650billions right now in the US's debt clock as below, which itself shows a continuous decline......

    U.S. National Debt Clock : Real Time

    no way that US & EU may even have its 2% long term growth, they had for last 30+ years. US & EU may hardly maintain 0% growth rate for this decade, if not less, as growing business/export of emerging economies/China have taken a large portion of business of OECD and now they are going to have business of high tech products more in future...... and on the top of that, debt level of US is very high, and it is recommended to reduce its defence expenditure by at least 20% to 50% too to its current level, to reduce borrowing debts, which US is currently borrowing at around $3.81bil every day to meet its expenditure commitments........

    one more example we have here, even if defence expenditure of Pakistan is around 4.5% to its GDP, it would always be able to spend at least this much as Pakistan is a developing economy, which would at least have 5%+ growth for the next 20 years, (the same is true for India, the developing economy too and emerging among BRIC). while India is projected to have close to 7% growth on average for the next 20 years, while China would also grow close to India, but its growth would come down from 2015 onward.......

    here we find that even if defence expenditure of India is hardly 1.9% of its GDP, its still the 3rd largest while measuring in PPP terms. and there is no problem to increase defence expenditure by on even 20% per year on average over the next 10 years, which would itself keep it close to 2.0% to its GDP on long run, (while considering inflation/value added etc). hence the current military strength of India is based on the least it spend on its defence as compare to US & EU, at hardly 1.9% to GDP, and it can only go up in future. while US & EU would only go down, no way that it may have high defence expenditure than its current level, at any time in future till 21st century..........
     
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  12. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    the list below includes just 4.5/4++ generation Combat Aircrafts of the number 21+ 12+ 9 = 42 :coffee:

     
  13. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    F-16 vs MiG-29

    Both the F-16 and the MiG-29 were designed to correct mistakes and shortcomings of previous aircraft. With the USAF it was the low kill ratios over Vietnam as well as the lack of complete air superiority over the battle field a feat that was achieved with great success both over the battlefield's of Europe and Korea where the US Army was able to operate under little threat of air attack. With the Russians they wanted an aircraft that would perform the same roles as the MiG-25 and the Su-27 but at a shorter range. As well as an aircraft that for the first time could match Western fighters in ACM, while maintaining the ability to operate as an interceptor. Thus the MiG-29 became a smaller and shorter range F-15 while the F-16 became a larger and longer range F-5.

    Both teams designed craft that were cleared to operations of 9g and made use of wing-body blending to increase internal volume , reduce weight and improve maneuverability. They both located the intakes close to structures to reduce the AoA (angle of attack) sensed at the face of the intake/s thus increasing the AoA that the aircraft could take in comparison to other aircraft of their day. With the F-16A the AoA limit is 25deg where as the MiG-29 has been cleared of an AoA of up to 45deg. :tup:

    One of the major differences was in the engine arrangement with the General Dynamics team choosing a single P&W F100 this gave commonality with the F-15 and lower fuel consumption. In contrast the Mikoyan team choose a twin arrangement of the RD-33 with no thought give to using the Saturn/Lyulka AL-31F as used in the Su-27. The reasoning being that the use of two engines gave the aircraft greater survivability as the MiG-23/27's suffered a greater attrition ratio then the MiG-25. With the intakes the GD team adopted a fixed geometry intake as high mach number capability was not required for the role that the F-16 was to fill, while the requirement for a dash speed of mach 2.3+ led Mikoyan to adopt a two dimensional , four shock , variable geometry intake with one fixed ramp and two moving ramps.

    In regard to FOD (foreign object damage) the GD team took the position that FOD would not be a problem as the F-16 would operate form swept, paved runways. Where as the Russians felt that a rough field capability was an important capability and as such devised two movable ramps over the intakes to prevent FOD while on the ground or at low speed at low level. When the intakes are closed the engines breath via auxiliary intakes on the upper surface of the wing. :coffee:

    The F-16 has incorporated a number of features that are intended to enhance combat effectiveness. The pilot's seat is inclined at 30deg rather than the normal 13deg , he also has a side stick controller which allows the pilots arm to be supported this has not met with universal approval as some pilots prefer to be able to fly with either hand. The F-16 also for the first time incorporated a Fly-By-Wire flight control system, this allowed the aircraft to be made inherently unstable and would greatly improve maneuverability in air-combat. While the MiG introduced the first HMS (helmet-mounted sight) and IRST (infra-red search and track) sensor with a laser range finder for passive attacks and missile engagements up to 45deg off-borsight but maintained a conventional flight control system and achieved high maneuverability mainly due advanced aerodynamics. i.e. The tail of the MiG-29 is said to have been positioned to take advantage of the four vortices by the wing and fuselage. :coffee:

    In combat provided that the MiG-29's 7.5g above 0.85 mach can be avoided it should beat any F-16 due to its BVR capability , higher thrust/weight ratio and lower wing loading. While in recent exercises between USAF F-16 and German MiG-29A's showed that in ACM the greatest advantage the MiG-29 had was it's helmet mounted sight coupled with the AA-11 Archer which gives it a kill zone greater than any aircraft serving. F-16 pilots found that any aircraft within 45deg's of the nose of a MiG-29 was always under grave threat. :thumb: The ability to target aircraft well of boresight has proved to be such a success that helmet mounted sights have become requirements on any new fighter program.

    While both aircraft have short-commings those of the MiG-29 have effectively been solved with newer versions ( MiG-29 S/M/K and MiG-33 ) which have increased the fuel capacity of the MiG as well as adding an in-flight refueling system. The number of hard points has also been increased by two and the max warload has been doubled, along with the inclusion of a fly-by-wire flight control system and a new radar that allowed two targets to be engaged simultaneously with the new AA-12 Adder active radar missile as well as full clearance for flight at 9 g's . Most of these upgrades have been offered to current users of the MiG-29 with the Russian and Indian airforces conducting some upgrades. :tup:

    The F-16 by comparison has had few of it's problems solved in the past few years. One of it's greatest drawbacks the lack of a BVR capability was solved with the clearance of the AMRAAM for use on the F-16 but the second major problem of insufficient wing area on the F-16C has never been solved.

    Vayu Sena - F-16 versus MiG-29
     
  14. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. F-16 Fighting Falcon kill records:

    1 Iraqi Mig-29 or Mig-23
    1 Serbian Mig-29
    4 Serbian Soko G-4 Super Galebs
    1 Iraqi Mig-25 (first AMRAAM kill)

    Israel F-16 kill records:

    2 Syrian MI-8 Hips
    44 Syrian Migs (mostly Floggers)

    Dutch F-16 kill record:

    1 Serbian Mig-29

    PAF F-16 kill records:

    2 Russian SU-22 Fitters
    8 Afghan Aircrafts
    1 PAF F-16 (fratricide)

    In the real world the F16 has a kill record of about a 100 to 5, I am not sure if the Mig 29 ever shot down a modern day fighter in 30 years time, perhaps you can correct me.

    F-16 vs. MiG-29 fighter jet dogfight - D?blin 2010 - HD - YouTube
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013
  15. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    in the real world F-16 were downed by fighters according to the opposition

    [​IMG]
     
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