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The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure Annually

Discussion in 'Modern Warfare' started by sunny_10, Jun 15, 2012.

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  1. S K Mittal

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Bangladesh should Increase it's defence Expenditure.
     
  2. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    India's military strength on the rise
    April 15, 2013

    India has successfully test-fired an "Agni II" surface-to-surface ballistic missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead of one ton. The missile, equipped with solid fuel engines, has a range of 2,000 km. According to Russian newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta, the launch once again proved that India has a reliable deterrent. As one of the world's largest arms-importing countries, India's weapons and equipment replacement program have been designed in response to armed conflict with Pakistan and to contend with increasingly military powerful China. For Russia, the consolidation of India's military forces goes hand-in-hand with Russia's strategic interests.

    As The Economist pointed out, the overall strength of the Indian armed forces is rapidly increasing. In the last five years, India had imported most arms in the world. For a long time, Russia has been India's main weapon supplier. According to a report released by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, India purchased weapons and equipment worth a total of $ 17.3 billion from Russia from 2007 to 2011. Additionally, India is in negotiations with French Dassault to buy 126 Rafale fighters, worth a total amount of over 12 billion dollars.

    In terms of army-size, the total strength of the Indian Army in Asia comes next to China's. India's defense budget has reached $ 46.8 billion. In the construction of nuclear power, India has 80 or more nuclear weapons, and the number is likely to increase further. As to the country's power in terms of nuclear weapons, India's surface-to-surface missiles appear able to cover the whole territory of Pakistan and most parts of China.

    New Delhi believes that instability in Pakistan and the world's second-largest economy China, are most likely to pose a threat to India's security. From a geopolitical point of view, China undoubtedly catches the Indian leaders' attention. As Indian Defense Minister Antony had declared in 2009, "India's major threat is not Pakistan, but China."

    Recently, despite India-Pakistan relations showing signs of abating, the situation still carries the possibility of escalating at any given time. China, as Pakistan's traditional ally, may help Islamabad in its fight against India. China, although it has never formally stated its stance on this matter, has provided Pakistan with a large number of weapons and nuclear technology, according to Nezavisimaya Gazeta.

    In addition to the Pakistani army, several jihadist communities active in Pakistan have also caught India's attention. These communities frequently organize terrorist attacks on domestic Indian objectives.

    "Bharatiya Janata Party, one of the two major political parties in India, has strong nationalist tendencies. It has opposed the partition scheme implemented by the UK and advocates the re-inclusion of Pakistan in India's territory. This claim, although not recognized by the Indian government and mainstream political forces, is likely to affect the relationship between India and Pakistan," Tatiana Shomyan, director of the Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, said in an interview with Nezavisimaya Gazeta.

    New Delhi is seeking to normalize relations with Islamabad. But no one knows what will happen next if the U.S. and NATO pull out of Afghanistan.

    "The border dispute between China and India is not a major problem. The border situation is stable. What disturbs India most is that China is establishing and consolidating new outposts around India, especially in the Indian Ocean area. A Chinese company has obtained control of Pakistan's Gwadar Port. In addition, China also hopes to perfect its naval support capabilities with the help from Sri Lanka. India is in response expanding its naval force. It is not having a conflict with China, but competing for influence in South Asia," Tatiana Shomyan remarked on Sino-Indian Relations.

    In order to maintain the strategic balance within the region, India is likely to seek the support of Moscow. Traditionally, India and Russia have maintained friendly relations at a political level, and this relationship has never been affected by any other geo-political disputes.

    India's military strength on the rise - China.org.cn
     
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  3. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    duplicate post
     
  4. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    We have new data's for the year 2012 as below: :coffee:

    => The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure in 2012

    Figures for military spending calculated using purchasing power parity (PPP), ($ b., PPP)

    1. United States- $682bn
    2. China- $249bn
    3. India- $119bn
    4. Russia- $116.0bn
    5. Saudi Arabia- $63.9bn
    6. United Kingdom- $57.5bn
    7. France- $50.7bn
    8. Japan- $46.0bn
    9. South Korea- $44.2bn
    10. Germany- $42.8bn
    11. Brazil- $34.4bn
    12. Italy- $31.0bn
    13. Turkey- $25.9bn
    14. Canada- $18.3bn
    15. Australia- $16.3bn

    http://www.sipri.org/research/armaments/milex/Top 15 table 2012.pdf

    a, The figures for national military expenditure as a share of GDP are based on estimates for 2012 GDP
    from the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) World Economic Outlook database, Oct. 2012.

    b, The figures for military expenditure at PPP exchange rates are estimates based on the projected implied PPP conversion rates for each country from the IMF World Economic Outlook database, Oct. 2012.


    => Recent trends in military expenditure — www.sipri.org
     
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  5. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Thread renamed to : The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure Annually

    and made sticky
     
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  6. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    one day we discussed it. Capital Expenditure of Indian Defence is around 40% of total expenditure, with around 50% to 70% of it is spent in buying foreign arms, considering the fact that most of the production line of the main arms like SU30mki, T90s, HAWK etc is in fact based in India itself. so this way we find around 90% of total Defence Expenditure is spent in India itself, somehow, some way :tup:

    one gentleman also calculated the same in a post, as below :coffee:

     
  7. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    The .pdf file in the link says India is at 8th place with $46.1 billion, you say India is at 3rd place with $119 billion?
     
  8. WMD

    WMD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    look at the last column of that pdf.
    the 1st column shows how much a country is spending on defense according to market exchange rate, but the last column indicates how much a country is spending according to purchasing power parity.
    sunny took the last column.
    Purchasing power parity means how much money is needed to buy the same product in 2 countries.
    It means 46.1 billion dollar in India will get you the same products and services as 119 billion dollar in the US.
    when u look at the budgets based on simple exchange rate those countries having high defense budgets comedown to lower positions in the list based on purchasing power parity due to high cost of living.
    Because USD is taken as the standard currency, the defense budget of US remains const. at 682 billion, but the defense budget of all the other countries either decreases or increases (depending on purchasing power parity), from the budget based on market exchange rate between the currency of that country and USD.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
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  9. INDIAN NATIONALIST

    INDIAN NATIONALIST Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    This is a depressing statistic considering India's reliance on purchasing foreign hardware.
    If the money was spent in indigenous defense industries it might be a point of pride.

    That India can afford to be in the top 3 (for now) is a testament to India's industrial potential, much of it continuing to go to waste due to massive corruption and inefficiencies. But nothing to be proud of that so much is purchased from abroad.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  10. rocky.idf

    rocky.idf BANNED BANNED

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    BD has no aggressive / conquering designs. The current level of defense expenditure is okay. If invaded, we shall defend ourselves with the Doctrine of Traditional People's War. We need to spend more and in the correct areas in education and national motivation. As a nation of Bengalee Muslims we need to devote much more of our attention and resources in bringing up future generations as good and devout children of Islam.
     
  11. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    IMO a true assessment of a country's growth of military power should be the return on investment versus the spend figure itself. Ex. India's defense procurement scandals lowers its ROI.
     
  12. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    For Rs 6 lakh crore (USD 100 billion)Indian armed forces set to acquire Star Wars-like weapons
    Jun 27 2013

    Seeking to prepare itself for futuristic warfare of the kind seen in the iconic and sensational Star Wars movies, Indian armed forces are planning to spend around Rs 6 lakh crore to get hi-tech equipment such as robots for combat roles, precision-guided missiles and watch-dog satellites, according to a Defence Ministry document. :thumb:

    In the document 'Technology and Capability Roadmap' for the armed forces for next 15 years, Defence Minister A K Antony has also made it clear that his department will make these acquisitions in a holistic manner "without compromising transparency, fairness and probity at any level."

    "In the next 15 years, Indian forces are poised for major modernisation... The volumes are high and the financial outlays large. There is substantial scope in the process for Indian industry to harness this market around USD 100 billion (Rs six lakh crore) to develop indigenous capability; especially in high technology areas," it said. The TCR has been provided by the Ministry as a step to provide a roadmap to the private and public sector indigenous industry about the requirements of the armed forces so that they can gear up themselves to provide the solutions.

    "The document is being put up in the public domain to establish a level playing field for the Indian defence industry, both public and private sector," the Ministry said. In the field of space, the TCR says the armed forces would require "watchdog satellites" to guard against the anti-satellite weapons, which have been developed by China.

    "With the advent of anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) a concept of `watchdog satellites to guard other satellites could also be explored," it said.The armed forces are also turning eco-friendly and have sought "eco-friendly solar, wind and electric power and propulsion systems which are capable of lowering fuel consumption, reduce pollution and better energy efficient while helping vessels to operate quietly." Seeking artificial warriors on field, the TCR said for winning land battles, the Army would need "Robots to assist troops in combat for tasks such as surveillance, reconnaissance, anti mine and anti IED role, urban area combat and casualty extraction."

    To deal with the threat of enemy ballistic missiles, the 45-page TCR says a capability called Joint Area Missile Defence would be required for air defence. "It will use air defence assets of the three services in conjunction with the surveillance sensors of other agencies to detect, track, acquire and destroy incoming theatre ballistic and cruise missiles," it said. Seeking capabilities to fight the menace of terrorism, the TCR said capabilities will have to to be developed to oppose terrorism throughout the threat spectrum including anti-terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    "It includes protection of personnel, assault, explosives detection and disposal, investigative sciences and forensics, physical security and protection of infrastructure and surveillance and collection. Successful execution of the wide range of R&D efforts will greatly improve the capability of the soldier," it said. The document, which is similar to a previous document issued in 2010, also envisages procurement of modern combat aircraft, combat drones, unmanned underwater systems, space-based capability, anti-submarine weapons launched from air, several types of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and training tools for the forces in next 15 years.

    For Rs 6 lakh crore, Indian armed forces set to acquire Star Wars-like weapons - Indian Express
     
  13. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    double post
     
  14. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Eye on future, India mulls options for nuclear-powered aircraft carrier
    Aug 1, 2013

    NEW DELHI: Nothing projects raw power like an aircraft carrier prowling on the high seas, capable of unleashing strike fighters against an adversary in a jiffy. A nuclear-powered carrier can make the punch even deadlier with much longer operational endurance.

    With its first indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC) set to be "launched" at Cochin Shipyard on August 12, and sea trials of the first nuclear submarine INS Arihant to begin shortly after, India is now examining the possibility of having a nuclear-powered 65,000-tonne carrier in the future.

    Navy vice-chief Vice Admiral RK Dhowan on Thursday said a "detailed study" was underway on the "size, type of aircraft and their launch and recovery systems, propulsion" and the like for the IAC-II project. "Yes, we are also considering nuclear propulsion. All options are being studied. No final decision has been taken," he said.

    There are huge cost issues with nuclear-powered carriers, which can easily take upwards of $10 billion to build. The Royal British Navy is reverting to carriers propelled by gas turbines/diesel-electric systems from nuclear ones.

    However, the US has 11 Nimitz-class "super-carriers" — each an over 94,000-tonne behemoth powered by two nuclear reactors and capable of carrying 80-90 fighters - to project power around the globe. China, too, is now looking at nuclear-powered carriers after inducting its first conventional carrier — the 65,000-tonne Liaoning — last September.

    So, while Navy may want a nuclear-powered carrier, it will ultimately have to be a considered political decision. The force, however, is firm about its long-term plan to operate three carrier-battle groups (CBGs). "One carrier for each (western and eastern) seaboard and one in maintenance," said Vice Admiral Dhowan.

    But, even two CBGs will be possible only by 2019. The 40,000-tonne IAC, to be christened INS Vikrant, will be ready for induction only by December 2018, as was first reported by TOI.

    "Design and construction of a carrier has many challenges. Around 75% of the IAC structure has now been erected. India joins only four countries — the US, Russia, the UK and France - capable of building a carrier over 40,000-tonne," he said.

    The 44,570-tonne INS Vikramaditya - or the Admiral Gorshkov carrier now undergoing sea trials after a $2.33-billion refit in Russia - in turn will be ready by end-2013 instead of the original August 2008 deadline. :tup:

    Vice Admiral Dhowan admitted India's solitary carrier, the 28,000-tonne INS Viraat, will soldier on till 2018 due to these long delays. The 54-year-old INS Viraat is left with just 11 Sea Harrier jump-jets to operate from its deck. The 45 MiG-29K naval fighters, being procured from Russia for over $2 billion, can operate only from Vikramaditya and IAC.

    The 260-metre-long IAC, whose construction finally began in November 2006, will be able to carry 12 MiG-29Ks, eight Tejas light combat aircraft and 10 early-warning and anti-submarine helicopters on its 2.5-acre flight deck and hangars. It will have a crew of 160 officers and 1,400 sailors. Powered by four American LM2500 gas turbines, the IAC will have an endurance of around 7,500 nautical miles at a speed of 18 knots. :coffee:

    Eye on future, India mulls options for nuclear-powered aircraft carrier - Times Of India
     
  15. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya delivery to India in mid-November
    Sep 17, 2013

    [​IMG]
    (India has paid $2.33 billion for INS Vikramadityas refit, instead of the original $974 million earmarked in the January 2004 contract under which the carrier was to be originally delivered by August 2008.)

    NEW DELHI: After a long running saga of hard-nosed negotiations since the late-1990s, cost escalations, refit delays and mishaps, aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya has finally completed its extensive sea trials in Russia. The 44,570-tonne warship, or the refurbished Admiral Gorshkov, is now all set to be handed over to India in mid-November.

    Defence ministry sources on Tuesday said INS Vikramaditya has "now successfully" finished its series of "sustained full-power and aviation trials" in the White and Barents seas. "The carrier will now head back to the harbour at Severodvinsk. It will then be made ready for the commissioning on November 15. It will reach Indian shores, with an Indian crew commanded by Captain Suraj Berry, in early-2014," said a source.

    India has paid $2.33 billion for Vikramaditya's refit, instead of the original $974 million earmarked in the January 2004 contract under which the carrier was to be originally delivered by August 2008. India is also spending another $2 billion to induct 45 Russian MiG-29K naval fighters to operate from the decks of INS Vikramaditya and the under-construction INS Vikrant, which too has been delayed at the Cochin Shipyard till at least end- 2018. :tup:

    Given the huge delays in both the projects, the Navy will continue to flog its old warhorse, the 54-year-old INS Viraat, which is left with just 11 Sea Harrier jump-jets to operate from its deck, till 2018. The delays have also derailed the Navy's long-stated aim to operate two full-fledged carrier battle groups (CBGs) anytime soon, as was earlier reported by TOI.

    INS Vikramaditya was to be inducted into the Indian Navy by last December, as per the then re-revised timeframe, but serious engine and boiler malfunctions during the trials delayed the delivery by another year.

    With the Mumbai harbour not capable of handling INS Vikramaditya, the mammoth warship will be based at the newish Karwar naval base in coastal Karnataka, which has undergone its Phase-I development at a cost of Rs 2,629 crore. The government recently also approved the Phase-IIA expansion of Karwar, which gives India both strategic depth and operational flexibility, at a cost of Rs 13,000 crore. :tup:

    Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya finishes trials in Russia, delivery to India in mid-November - Times Of India
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2013
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