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The Flying White Elephant

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by Picdelamirand-oil, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    What? I'm measuring it against a Gripen which consumes more than half the fuel + maintenance etc.
     
  2. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Regardless, the cost of the fuel is not CPFH, it is for a full tank.
     
  3. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Right so basically the article is horseshit then when it says it's CPFH for fuel.
     
  4. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Of course. That's evident. I laughed when the report first came out.
     
  5. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    So probably all wrong then.
     
  6. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Not necessarily. It doesn't have an apples to apples comparison. The report's just thrown random figures around.
     
  7. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Yeah, so probably all wrong, especially given currency fluctuations.
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Electronic Weapons: SEAD For UAVs

    August 17, 2016: The U.S. Air Force has developed a 15 day training course for MQ-1 (Predator) and MQ-9 (Reaper) UAV operators (pilots) to qualify them as “Electronic Combat Officers.” This means that the air force is finally equipping its larger MQ-1 and MQ-9 for EW (electronic warfare) missions. These two UAVs are large enough to carry some of the electronic sensors and jammers regularly used in missions seeking electronic information (ELINT) or for combat (SEAD). U.S. Navy and Air Force commanders have long wanted to turn over SEAD (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses) missions to UAVs. SEAD is the most dangerous mission for combat pilots. But until a few years ago, all these UAV projects had either been cancelled, or were headed in that direction. That appears to be changing.

    The Reaper is large enough, in theory, to also carry a pair of the latest anti-radar missiles. These are the AARGM which weighs 361 kg (794 pounds) and can detect and attack targets more than 150 kilometers away while travelling at a speed of 2,450 kilometers per hour. It is more likely that the MQ-9 and MQ-1 would carry lighter missiles that can act as decoys to divert the attention of enemy radars.
     
    BMD likes this.
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    F-35C at Sea for U.S. Navy Development Test III
    USS George Washington (CVN 73) // August 16, 2016
    The F-35C Lightning II is conducting operations aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73) for Development Test III (DT-III).



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    Pilots and maintainers from VFA-101, also known as the Grim Reapers, based at Eglin AFB, Florida, and from the NAS Patuxent River Integrated Test Force team, are exceeding expectations during the test. Pilot carrier qualifications for VFA-101 were completed in two days, and the Pax River ITF has completed 125 test points and eliminated 101 test point requirements due to exceptional performance.
     
  10. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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  11. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    F-35A Catches Fire at Mountain Home Air Force Base

    WASHINGTON — An F-35A caught fire during an exercise at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, the Air Force confirmed to Defense News.

    The incident took place at around noon and involved an F-35A aircraft from the 61st Fighter Squadron located at Luke Air Force Base, the service said in a statement. No serious injuries seem to have been sustained by the pilot or nearby crew.

    "The pilot had to egress the aircraft during engine start due to a fire from the aft section of the aircraft," Air Force spokesman Capt. Mark Graff said in an email. "The fire was extinguished quickly. As a precautionary measure, four 61st Aircraft Maintenance Unit Airmen, three Airmen from the 366th Maintenance Group and the 61st Fighter Squadron pilot were transported to the base medical center for standard evaluation."

    Seven F-35As from Luke AFB, which is one of the bases responsible for joint strike fighter pilot instruction, had deployed to Mountain Home to conduct surface-to-air training from Sept. 10 to 24.

    The root cause of the event is under investigation, Graff stated.

    At the time of publication, it is still unknown whether the fire originated from the F-35's F135 engine, manufactured by Pratt & Whitney.

    "We are aware of an incident involving an F-35A jet from Luke Air Force Base operating at Mountain Home Air Force Base, but we do not have any further details at this time," said Pratt & Whitney spokesman Matthew Bates. "We are ready to assist the U.S. Air Force and the F-35 Joint Program Office in their investigation."

    It's also unknown if there is a connection to a recent problem with the F-35A's coolant line insulation that caused the flight operations of 15 joint strike fighters to be suspended. During depot maintenance it was discovered that the insulation around the coolant lines was breaking down inside the fuel tank— a situation the joint program office said was due to the supplier using the incorrect materials to manufacture the insulation.

    The insulation issue also impacts 42 F-35s on manufacturer Lockheed Martin's production line. When the problem was made public last Friday, JPO officials said they were certain no other planes had been affected. Earlier this week, F-35 Joint Program Executive Officer Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan said Lockheed planned to test a potential fix next week, and if it works, company teams would roll out the following week to begin repairs.

    Marine Corps Times Reporter Jeff Schogol and Defense News reporter Aaron Mehta contributed to this report.

    http://www.defensenews.com/articles...Force Base&utm_term=Editorial - Breaking News
     
  13. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Maybe Safran could offer the M88 to LM ? :azn:
     
  14. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Sealant issue, that is all.

    Yeah, I'm sure an M88 with 17,000lbf will lift an F-35.
     
  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Carlisle: F-35A is fusion warfare key component
    By Tech. Sgt. Natalie Stanley, Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs / Published September 21, 2016



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    Gen. Hawk Carlisle, Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan, Brig. Gen. Scott Pleus and Col. David Lyons, speak during the F-35 Lightning II reaching initial operational capability panel discussion during the Air Force Association's Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Md., Sept. 20, 2016. Carlisle is the Air Combat Command commander, Bogdan is the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office executive officer, Pleus is the F-35 Integration Office director, and Lyons is the 388th Fighter Wing commander. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr.)

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    Gen. Hawk Carlisle, Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan, Brig. Gen. Scott Pleus and Col. David Lyons, speak during the F-35 Lightning II reaching initial operational capability panel discussion during the Air Force Association's Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Md., Sept. 20, 2016. Carlisle is the Air Combat Command commander, Bogdan is the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office executive officer, Pleus is the F-35 Integration Office director, and Lyons is the 388th Fighter Wing commander. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr.)

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    An F-35 Lightning II helmet sits on stage during the F-35 reaching initial operational capability panel discussion during the Air Force Association's Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Md., Sept. 20, 2016. The F-35’s helmet mounted display system is the most advanced system of its kind. All the intelligence and targeting information an F-35 pilot needs to complete the mission is displayed on the helmet’s visor. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr.)

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    An F-35A parks for the night under the sunshades at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Feb. 18, 2016. The F-35s tested their combat capabilities through an operational deployment test at Mountain Home AFB range complexes.(U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jeremy L. Mosier)

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    An F-35 Lightning II demonstration aircraft takes off during the AirPower over Hampton Roads Open House at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., April 24, 2016. The aircraft performed alongside and F-22 Raptor and a P-51 Mustang as part of the Heritage Flight Program, which showcases the evolution of airpower by flying today's state-of-the-art fighter aircraft in close formation with vintage fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman R. Alex Durbin)


    NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. (AFNS) -- During a panel session at the Air Force Association Air, Space and Cyber Conference here Sept. 20, F-35A Lightning II senior leadership discussed the future of the multi-role aircraft.

    Gen. Hawk Carlisle, the Air Combat Command commander, declared the F-35A the key component of fusion warfare.

    “It changes the game,” Carlisle said. “It is going to be the difference maker and the backbone of the interoperability capabilities of the future.”

    Carlisle acknowledged the evolution of the F-35A has been a “challenging endeavor.”

    “It would have been easier to take a different path,” Carlisle said. “But it would have been the wrong answer.”

    As a fifth-generation fighter, the F-35A provides unprecedented global precision attack capability against current and emerging targets. The aircraft incorporates state-of-the-art sensor fusion, networked interoperability and a broad array of advanced air-to-air and air-to-surface munitions enabling unmatched lethality for decades.

    “In terms of lethality and survivability, the aircraft is absolutely head and shoulders above our legacy fleet of fighters currently fielded,” said Gen. Scott Pleus, the F-35A integration office director. “This is a formidable airplane and one our adversaries should fear.”

    Carlisle declared the Lightning II combat ready on Aug. 2, after extensive readiness assessments. The aircraft proved its capabilities during multiple exercises throughout the summer.

    In June 2016, seven F-35As from Hill Air Force Base, Utah, conducted combat testing scenarios at Mountain Home AFB, Idaho. The two-week deployment established the aircraft’s combat readiness with 88 sorties planned and executed.

    Following the initial operational capability announcement, the 33rd Fighter Wing participated in Exercise Northern Lightning Aug. 31 at Volk Field, Wisconsin, the largest F-35A deployment to date. In an exercise that will shape future real-world deployments, the 33rd FW recorded more than 110 kills against “enemy aircraft,” supported a surge of 138 sorties and dropped 24 GBU-12 laser-guided bombs during the exercise.

    Despite these significant milestones, the program continues to face scrutiny following the announcement of insulation problems affecting 15 aircraft in the field. Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan, the F-35A Joint Strike Fighter Program executive officer, acknowledged problems will occur with any new system being developed and now is the time to find and fix those issues.

    “The program itself is making progress,” Bogdan said. “The mark of a good program is not that you don’t have any problems, but that you find things early, you fix them and you move on.”

    The F-35A program is continuing to move forward with plans to obtain full operational capabilities.

    “This is a fantastic airplane,” Carlisle said. “Although there are bumps in the road, I firmly believe this aircraft will only get better and better, and will prove to be one of the most valuable assets in our United States Air Force.”
     

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