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The Flying White Elephant

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by Picdelamirand-oil, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The Warbird That Dominates The Skies
    By J. Hardy, Feb 6, 2017

    Smart Bombs
    Most people still think of the B-2 stealth bomber as the quintessential stealth aircraft for use in military operations and situations. However, the F-35 has proven for once and for all that there’s a new kid in town, and that kid isn’t ready to be seen as #2. The F-35 includes a laser designator that helps it drop smart bombs from the air without sacrificing stealth operations. Furthermore, the fighter jet can jam opposing fighter pilots’ radars, including pilots of the F-22 Raptor.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    You know where is Italy? It's the flag just behind the canopy on this scale model !

    Italy financial court say it cost arround 130 €million = 140 to 145$million.... not 98 or 116 $ million as LM propaganda say.

    http://www.repubblica.it/economia/2...addoppiati_ma_non_possiamo_uscire_-172579007/
    http://indiandefence.com/threads/the-flying-white-elephant.24105/page-169#post-584583
     
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The Warbird That Dominates The Skies
    By J. Hardy, Feb 6, 2017

    Lots of New Features
    The F-35 fighter jet has gone through some of the most rigorous testing procedures in aviation history. A 12 Weapons Delivery Accuracy test was recently conducted for the jet, while air-to-surface and air-to-air countermeasure testing was also performed. Finally, the aircraft’s Gen III helmet underwent testing for its mounted display while using night testing, formation testing, refueling testing, and measuring approaches.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The Warbird That Dominates The Skies
    By J. Hardy, Feb 6, 2017

    Same Programming as a Space Shuttle
    Space shuttle launches are no small task. They require millions of lines of code and more smart people than you can find in your average advanced calculus course. Therefore, it may be difficult to believe that there are actually more lines of programming code found in the average F-35 than what was used to launch space shuttle.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    the same folding wings which need to be replace on some planes?
    The famous folding wings that can't support AIM9X ?
     
    Angel Eyes likes this.
  6. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    A fireman helmet ?

    Very usefull to estingwish fired F35...

    http://www.defensenews.com/air/2017...s-air-force-base-sparked-by-strong-tailwinds/
    upload_2017-8-11_14-54-45.jpeg [​IMG]
     
  7. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    The Limits of Stealth and the F-35

    Lacking maneuverability and payload, the survivability of the F-35 will depend heavily on its stealth characteristics.
    In the context of modern warfare, stealth is the suppression or camouflage of any signature that could be used by the enemy to detect friendly platforms. With respect to aircraft, this mostly refers to heat or infrared emissions, electromagnetic emissions, and radar signature. Of these, stealth is usually most associated with minimizing radar signature, an effect produced by a combination of radar-deflecting shapes and absorbent materials.

    Today’s stealth technology is an outgrowth of a broader “hider-seeker” competitive dynamic for an information advantage fundamental to all warfare, i.e., the evolving competition between the methods for finding an opponent and the methods for hiding.
    The kind of stealth technology used in modern aircraft has a development history dating back to World War II, when Germany experimented with radar-deflecting shapes and radar-absorbing materials to counter allied radars. During the Cold War, the United States attempted to develop stealth technology in a series of projects, culminating in the stealthy F-117A, B-2, and F-22. By the end of the Cold War, the United States had invested heavily in stealth and adopted the technology as a part of its efforts to maintain an airpower advantage. The F-35 is the latest instance of this trend in the form of a multi-trillion dollar bet that the kind of stealth technology that has worked in the past will continue to work over the program’s five-decade-long service life.

    The problem for the F-35 is that there is growing evidence that the program is betting on the wrong side of the hider-seeker competition. Instead, it seems that the seekers – not the hiders – are gaining the advantage. Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Greenert wrote that technological innovations “make stealth and its advantages increasingly difficult to maintain,” referring primarily to innovations in radar, computing, and infrared sensors. “Those developments do not herald the end of stealth, but they do show the limits of stealth design,” he concluded. Greenert more recently characterized stealth as “over-rated.” As we detail below, the limits of stealth are very real. In the case of the F-35, the limits of stealth may be especially harsh because its radar-evading qualities are built-in and difficult, if not impossible, to significantly alter once the aircraft is produced.
     
  8. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
    As Figure 2 shows, the Program Acquisition Unit Cost (PAUC) of the F-35 is nearly $160 million,70 which is anywhere from three to nine times the cost of the aircraft the F-35 will replace (A-10, AV-8B, F-16, F/A-18C/D) or may replace (F-15).71 Of the many ways to measure the expense of aircraft, PAUC is the most complete in that it considers the full direct costs of producing a system, including research and development, the procurement cost of building the aircraft itself, and the military construction necessary to field the aircraft.

    Conclusion

    Despite plans for the F-35 to replace most of America’s fighter and attack aircraft, the platform is ill-suited to cost-effectively counter near-peer foreign militaries.
    The aircraft lacks the maneuverability, payload, likely ability to generate sorties, and range to effectively compete with near-peer competitors despite its lifetime costs of $1.4 trillion.
    The aircraft’s survivability depends largely upon stealth characteristics that are already at risk for obsolescence against adversaries who over the next 50 years will only continue to upgrade their radar and infrared detection systems.
    Given the critical failings of the F-35 program and its exorbitant costs, the aircraft should be regarded as a bad bet. As such, proceeding with the full program buy of nearly 2,500 units–or any large-scale buy that approaches that number–should be avoided.
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Dog Fighting is a turd people keep polishing when they don't have anything better.
     
  10. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    DOD to begin yearlong JSF cost deep-dive in October
    August 31, 2017 |
    Courtney Albon
    [​IMG]
    The Defense Department will kick off a yearlong excursion in October to determine the true price of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and will spend the next year working with prime and sub-tier suppliers to develop a strategy to inject competition and incentivize affordability into the department's most expensive program. The Pentagon's pricing chief, Shay Assad, told Inside the Air Force he has been working closely with the F-35 joint program office to develop a plan for the deep-dive review...

    https://insidedefense.com/inside-air-force/dod-begin-yearlong-jsf-cost-deep-dive-october

    So we will know, but it will need one year of work !!!!
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Bet its a lot less then 240 million each.
     
  12. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    I don't know, it need one year of work to know, but I bet its a lot more than Rafale price.
     
  13. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Considering that it is estimated that one F35 is worth 70 Rafales does it really matter.
     
  14. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    What is important is to send the people making these estimates to the asylum
     
  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The Air Force is upgrading the F-22 Raptor's stealth coating and weapons systems
    [​IMG]
    • Aug. 29, 2017, 10:4

    • The Air Force is performing key maintenance on the F-22 Raptor's stealth materials while upgrading the stealth fighter with new attack weapons to include improved air-to-air and air-to-surface strike technology, service officials said.

      Months ago, the Air Force contracted Lockheed Martin to perform essential maintenance to the F-22's low-observable stealth coating to ensure it is equipped to manage fast-emerging threats.

      Lockheed Martin completed the first F-22 Raptor at the company’s Inlet Coating Repair (ICR) Speedline, a company statement said.

      "Periodic maintenance is required to maintain the special exterior coatings that contribute to the 5th Generation Raptor’s Very Low Observable radar cross-section," Lockheed stated.

      The increase in F-22 deployments, including ongoing operational combat missions, has increased the demand for ICR. Additionally, Lockheed Martin is providing modification support services, analytical condition inspections, radar cross section turntable support and antenna calibration.

      [​IMG]An F-22 Raptor from the Hawaii Air National Guard’s 199th Fighter Squadron returns to a training mission after refueling March 27, 2012, over the Pacific Ocean near the Hawaiian Islands.US Air Force Photo



      Also, Air Force officials have told Scout Warrior that, by 2019, the service will begin upgrading F-22 functionality for the AIM-120D and AIM-9X Air-to-Air missiles as well as enhanced Air-to-Surface target location capabilities. The F-22 currently carries the AIM-9X Block 1 and the current upgrade will enable carriage of AIM-9X Block 2.

      Raytheon AIM-9X weapons developers explain that the Block 2 variant adds a redesigned fuze and a digital ignition safety device that enhances ground handling and in-flight safety. Block II also features updated electronics that enable significant enhancements, including lock-on-after-launch capability using a new weapon datalink to support beyond visual range engagements, a Raytheon statement said.

      Another part of the weapons upgrade includes engineering the F-22 to fire the AIM-120D, a beyond visual range Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM), designed for all weather day-and-night attacks; it is a "fire and forget" missile with active transmit radar guidance, Raytheon data states. The AIM-120D is built with upgrades to previous AMRAAM missiles by increasing attack range, GPS navigation, inertial measurment units and a two-way data link, Raytheon statements explain.

      The AIM-120D also includes improved High-Angle Off-Boresight technology enabling the weapon to destroy targets at a wider range of angles.

      Additional upgrades to the stealth fighter, slated for 2021, are designed to better enable digital communications via data links with 4th and 5th generation airplanes.

      [​IMG]US Army soldiers guard US Air Force F-22 Raptor fighters at the military air base in Siauliai, Lithuania, April 27, 2016.Thomson Reuters



      As the Air Force and Lockheed Martin move forward with weapons envelope expansions and enhancements for the F-22, there is of course a commensurate need to upgrade software and its on-board sensors to adjust to emerging future threats, industry developers explained. Ultimately, this effort will lead the Air Force to draft up requirements for new F-22 sensors.

      The Air Force is in the early phases of designing new sensors for its stealthy 5th-generation F-22 Raptor as it proceeds with software upgrades, hardware adjustments, new antennas and data link improvements designed to better enable to connect the F-22 and F-35 sensor packages to one another, industry officials explained.

      Sensor interoperability, two-way data links and other kinds of technical integration between the two 5th-Gen stealth aircraft are considered key to an Air Force combat strategy which intends for the F-22 speed and air-to-air combat supremacy to complement and work in tandem with the F-35's next-gen sensors, precision-attack technology, computers and multi-role fighting mission ability.

      An essential software adjustment, called “Update 6,” is now being worked on by Lockheed Martin engineers on contract with the Air Force. Work on the software is slated to be finished by 2020, John Cottam, F-22 Program Deputy, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, told Scout Warrior in an interview several months ago.

      "The F-22 is designed to fly in concert with F-35. Software Update 6 for the F-22 will give the Air Force a chance to link their sensor packages together. Sensors are a key component to its capability. As the F-22 gets its new weapons on board – you are going to need to upgrade the sensors to use the new weapons capability," Cottam added.

      [​IMG]An F-22 Raptor prepares to refuel during the training exercise Red Flag 16.US Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Burt Traynor



      A hardware portion of the upgrades, called a “tactical mandate,” involves engineering new antennas specifically designed to preserve the stealth configuration of the F-22.

      “New antennas have to be first constructed. They will be retrofitted onto the airplane. Because of the stealth configuration putting, antennas on is difficult and time consuming,” Cottam said.

      While the F-35 is engineered with dog-fighting abilities, its advanced sensor technology is intended to recognize enemy threats at much further distances - enabling earlier, longer-range attacks to destroy enemies in the air. Such technologies, which include 360-degree sensors known as Northrop Grumman's Distributed Aperture System and a long range Electro-Optical Targeting System, are designed to give the F-35 an ability to destroy targets at much longer ranges - therefore precluding the need to dogfight.

      Like the F-35, the latest F-22s have radar (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and data-links (F-22 has LINK 16), radar warning receivers and targeting technologies. Being that the F-22 is regarded as the world's best air-to-air platform, an ability for an F-35 and F-22 to more quickly exchange sensor information such as targeting data would produce a potential battlefield advantage, industry developers and Air Force senior leaders have explained.

      [​IMG]F-22 Raptors from Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. fly in formation behind a KC-135 Stratotanker from Altus Air Force Base, Okla. after air refueling over New York, Aug. 21, 2012.US Air Force



      For example, either of the aircraft could use stealth technology to penetrate enemy airspace and destroy air defense systems. Once a safe air corridor is established for further attacks, an F-22 could maintain or ensure continued air supremacy while an F-35 conducted close-air-support ground attacks or pursued ISR missions with its drone-like video-surveillance technology. Additionally, either platform could identify targets for the other, drawing upon the strengths of each.

      Conversely, an F-35 could use its long-range sensors and "sensor fusion" to identify airborne targets which the F-22 may be best suited to attack.

      Air Force developers are, quite naturally, acutely aware of the Chinese J-20 stealth fighter and Russia's PAK-FA T-50 stealth aircraft as evidence that the US will need to work vigorously to sustain its technological edge.

      Along these lines, both the F-22 and F-35 are engineered to draw from "mission data files," described as on-board libraries storing information on known threats in particular geographical locations. This database is integrated into a radar warning receiver so that aircraft have the earliest possible indication of the threats they are seeing.

      [​IMG]F-22 Raptors from the 95th Fighter Squadron land at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, April 11, 2016.USAF



      As the Air Force and Lockheed Martin move forward with weapons envelope expansions and enhancements for the F-22, there is of course a commensurate need to upgrade software and its on-board sensors to adjust to emerging future threats, industry developers explained. Ultimately, this effort will lead the Air Force to draft up requirements for new F-22 sensors.

      Cottam also explained that the House and Senate have directed the Air Force to look at two different potential sensor upgrades for the F-22, an effort the service is now in the conceptual phase of exploring.

      "A sensor enhancement program is now being configured. We do not know what that is going to entail because it is not yet funded by the Air Force and we have not seen a requirements documents," Cottam said. "Threats in the world are always evolving so we need to evolve this plane as well."

      Newer F-22s have a technology called Synthetic Aperture Radar, or SAR, which uses electromagnetic signals or “pings” to deliver a picture or rendering of the terrain below, allow for better target identification.

      The SAR technology sends a ping to the ground and then analyzes the return signal to calculate the contours, distance and characteristics of the ground below.

      Read the original article on Scout Warrior.
     

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