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Transport Aircrafts of IAF - C-130J, C-17 Globemaster, C295: Updates & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by hotstud69, May 1, 2010.

  1. hotstud69

    hotstud69 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    IAF Pilots Chosen To Receive Training On C-130J

    The Indian Air Force has chosen a group of pilots to receive training to fly the Lockheed Martin-build C-130J airlifter, the first of which is set for delivery in December.

    “We have identified the team for training,†IAF Vice Chief Air Marshal P.K. Barbora told AVIATION WEEK. Sources said the first group of IAF crewmembers has already left for the U.S., but this could not be independently verified.

    “[An] initial set of people will be trained in maintenance and basic operations of the machine by the original equipment manufacturer,†says Air Vice Marshal M. Matheswaran, Assistant Chief of Air Staff Ops (Space).

    India is to receive six C-130Js, with an option for six more. The aircraft will undergo flight trials in India before being inducted into the IAF, sources say. It will likely be based at Hindon Air Force Station, and work on permanent hangars is in full swing. The aircraft’s U.S. assembly line is in Marietta, Ga.

    “The order includes three years of initial support, training of air crew and maintenance technicians, spares, ground support and test equipment, servicing carts, forklifts, loading vehicles, cargo pallets, and a team of technical specialists who will be based in India during the three-year initial support period,†a statement says. “Also included is operational equipment designed to increase Special Operations capabilities.â€

    The configuration offered to India includes a stretch version with air-to-air receiver refueling capability for extended range operations, an Infrared Detection Set (IDS), the ability to perform precision low-level flying, airdrops and landing in blackout conditions, and self-protection systems.

    The C-130J can carry eight 463L pallets, 97 medical litters, 128 combat troops and 92 paratroops.

    Although the exterior looks very much like previous C-130s, the aircraft will be different in many ways, according to a source. “The mission and propulsion systems have been completely redesigned. [The aircraft has] a new digital avionics architecture and propulsion system, twin head-up pilot displays that are certified as primary flight instruments, and dual mission computers that automate many functions, allowing the aircraft to be operated by only two pilots and a loadmaster,†the source says.

    A key to the C-130J’s increased performance is the new propulsion system. Four Rolls-Royce AE 2100D3 engines, each flat rated at 4,591 shp, generate more thrust with greater fuel efficiency.

    The C-130J’s mission flexibility has also sparked interest from India’s Border Security Force, Coast Guard and Meteorology Department, Lockheed Martin says.

    The program’s offset requirements amount to around $300 million.

    http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_generic.jsp?topicName=india
     
  3. Veer

    Veer 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    US to hand over first C-130J plane to India in December

    US to hand over first C-130J plane to India in December

    New Delhi, Oct 25 (PTI) The US will hand over the first of the six C-130Js ordered by India to its Air Force in December and it is expected to reach its base near here by February next year. The C-130J made for India by American aerospace major Lockheed Martin at its Marietta facility had recently carried out its first flight successfully after it was painted in IAF colours.

    "The first of the six C-130Js ordered by India will be handed over in December this year in Georgia and it will reach its Indian base by February next year," American government officials told reporters here ahead of their President Barack Obama's visit here beginning November six. India had bought the C-130Js from the US through an agreement signed in 2007 for USD 950 million.

    The officials said the US company had executed the deal "on time and on budget". On the USD 2.1-billion deal for eight P-8I maritime patrol aircraft deal, the officials said it was interesting that both India and US navies would get the platform at the same time sometime next year, providing "an opportunity" to learn together." "It is a brand new platform for both US and India," they added.

    The officials said India was keen on buying 145 M777 howitzers from the US for which the guns were put on trial in India last week. With India's artillery procurements getting delayed, New Delhi had expressed its interest to the US to buy the guns for which US Congress approval had been sought.

    "We are now moving towards more military sales," they added. The officials also noted that the Indo-US military relationship was "matured and well evolved," and not based on one transaction. "It is based on exchanges. This is not a relationship, it is partnership," they said, pointing out that US' military exercises with India was the "biggest" the Americans held. India's Army, Navy, Air Force and Special Forces hold frequent exercises with the US counterparts.

    US to hand over first C-130J plane to India in December, IBN Live News
     
  4. Patrician

    Patrician Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    US strips IAF C-130J

    US strips IAF C-130J


    In just over four weeks from now, the Indian Air Force (IAF) will take delivery of its first American-built C-130J Super Hercules military transport aircraft at a facility in Georgia, US. Part of a 2008 deal worth $ 964 million for six aircraft, the IAF C-130J will be the first US military aircraft India has procured in over four decades since it flew the American Douglas Dakota and Fairchild Packet in the 1960s.

    But there is something amiss. The contract document, a copy of which is with Headlines Today, reveals five specific pieces of high-end equipment, that the US has stripped from the aircraft, being sold to India. This is a direct consequence of New Delhi's reluctance to enter into a contentious technology inter- operability agreement with Washington.

    The equipment kept off the Indian aircraft includes its advanced communications equipment. The equipment includes the AN/ ARC- 222 SINCGARS combat net radio, the KV- 119 Identify Friend- Foe digital transponder, the TACTERM/ANDVT high frequency secure voice terminal, the VINSON KY- 58 secure voice module and parts of the Rockwell- Collins AN/ ARC-210(V) SATCOM transceiver.

    The equipment facilitates secure, encrypted communication - facilities that would be deeply useful in covert or special forces operations. Such operations form the secondary mission profile ascribed to the C-130J in India.

    The US has refused to fit these items on the Indian C-130J fleet unless India enters into a bilateral pact that the Indian military leadership is deeply suspicious about. It is called CISMOA - short for communications inter- operability and security memorandum of agreement.

    Last month, defence minister A. K. Antony is understood to have told his counterpart in Washington that the agreement would not be signed any time soon - certainly not during US President Barack Obama's visit - because India was far from convinced about the benefits that would accrue to its Indian defence forces.

    Strangely, even though the IAF had specifically asked for the high- technology items mentioned above, the C- 130J contract suggests that there is a chance the equipment won't be made available even if India signs the CISMOA. Referring to the stripped items, the contract says: " These items may be added when CISMOA is signed between" the US and India.

    Lockheed-Martin officials indicated that the IAF C-130J configuration was frozen before the contract was signed and that there were no last- minute surprises, a point conceded by the IAF. "There could be implications for operational autonomy at play here, which is something a service as large as the Indian Air Force cannot afford," Air Marshal (retd) A. K. Singh, former commander of the IAF's Western Air Command, said. A substantial part of the IAF agrees with that view.

    An extreme view is that fitting advanced communications gear on Indian aircraft, and having them governed by an agreement like CISMOA, would allow the US remote power over the equipment through satellite- relayed " kill switches" that could render equipment unusable, not to mention leaving doors open to electronic espionage.

    But the IAF put on a brave face.

    "The government had asked for our opinion.... It [ not getting the equipment] will not make any substantial difference to our operational capability," Air Chief Marshal P. V. Naik said A section of the IAF, however, believes that if India is resolved to deepen its ties with the US, then agreements like CISMOA are simply enablers of more nuanced, meaningful exchanges in operational theatres. For now though, the armed forces are sceptical.

    [​IMG]

    --------------------------------

    This should serve us as a lesson to be careful while dealing with the US. I hope MoD realises this while taking any decision on MMRCA and other such critical deals in the future.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2010
  5. Dilemma

    Dilemma Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Well I'm pretty sure IAF and MoD will be keeping this into consideration when they make a decision on the MMRCA. But hey, we should expect the decision on the MMRCA not before mid 2011. Till then, there is still a lot of time and you never know what might happen. In the end, when both sides are so adamant they might reach some sort of compromise from both sides.

    But it is good to know the MoD and the armed forces are standing their ground on this one. Wondering if the US might end up arm-twisting India into signing those agreements.
     
  6. Patrician

    Patrician Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    I do not think US will be able to arm-twist India into signing these agreements any time soon, not after the IAF chief's recent press conference in which he clearly stated that it won't make us much of a difference if we did not sign these agreements.

    When a person of such a high rank as IAF chief says something like this, it more or less reflects the view of the government. Hence we can sadfely assume that India is not signing these agreements in the foreseeable future.
     
  7. Bang Galore

    Bang Galore Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    I find this kind of journalism strikingly stupid. India is the buyer. India will not buy anything that she does not want or buy something that does not fulfill the requirements. If certain equipment has not been delivered along with the platform, one can safely assume that alternate sources(Israel, France) would have been tapped for those. The end price of any equipment is the sum total of all its parts. If any part is nor bought/sold, then the price is reduced accordingly. If that particular piece of equipment was deemed to be absolutely essential, then either the necessary agreements would have been signed or the decision to buy the platform would have been scrapped. The IAF has concluded that it can source the necessary equipment from 3rd parties & that it didn't think that it was necessary to sign up to some of the US agreements for those to be made available.

    No real issue here.
     
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  8. illuminatidinesh

    illuminatidinesh 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    I appreciate ur post here, there is nothing missing in this plane. We are getting what we asked for, as for critical components they were never part of the deal. We didnt sign the necessary agreement as we considered it s not in the interest.
    Just a hyped media report.
     
  9. Hashu

    Hashu Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    i agree! even IAF said that! :) plus y do we even need to connect to us communications and gps? lol we got our own
     
  10. INDIA

    INDIA FULL MEMBER

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    signing CISMOA or not will not make any difference.........we are getting what we asked for....
     
  11. Leonidas

    Leonidas FULL MEMBER

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    So when are they finally coming to India..?
     
  12. Dilemma

    Dilemma Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    The first one will be delivered in December this year.
     
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  13. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    Lockheed Martin delivers India's first C-130J aircraft

    Lockheed Martin delivers India's first C-130J aircraft
    Indira Kannan / New York December 17, 2010, 0:41 IST

    US aerospace and defence company Lockheed Martin expects India’s defence ministry to approve a formal letter of request to be sent to the US government for an additional six C-130J Super Hercules military transport aircraft within the next couple of months, according to Orville Prins, the company’s vice-president for business development in India. Under the contract, worth nearly $1 billion and signed in 2008 for six C-130J aircraft, India had an option to buy six more planes.

    Prins spoke to Business Standard from his company’s facility in Marietta, near Atlanta, Georgia, shortly after Lockheed Martin formally delivered India’s first C-130J aircraft to the US Air Force (USAF), which received it on behalf of the Indian Air Force (IAF). Two C-130Js will be flown by IAF crews to India early next year, in late January or early February. They are expected to arrive in time to be shown at the Aero India 2011 expo from February 9-13 in Bangalore.

    The remaining four aircraft will be delivered by late summer of next year, months ahead of schedule, according to Lockheed Martin.

    The company expects the order for the additional six C-130J aircraft to be identical or very similar to the initial order. Prins said the IAF crews, who had been training with the machines in the US for the past few months, were very pleased with their experience.

    The planes have been modified and specially equipped for special mission roles. The IAF requirements included capability for precision low-level flying, airdrops, landing in blackout conditions, and features to ensure survivability in hostile air defence environments. The IAF models are the longer fuselage variant of the C-130J, similar to those used by the USAF.

    While Pakistan has operated C-130 aircraft for several years, this will be India’s first experience with any variant of this machine. Additional support and infrastructure requirements as a new operator have added to the price tag of the initial order, according to Prins. He pointed out that if the IAF decides to station the additional aircraft at the Hindan air base near New Delhi, along with the first six planes, the support requirements will be proportionately lower, even as the baseline price for the aircraft would remain the same for the follow-up order.

    The aircraft delivered to the IAF will not have some advanced communications security equipment such as high precision global positioning system, as India is yet to sign certain security agreements, including the Communications Interoperability and Security Memorandum of Agreement, or CISMOA, with the US government. But Prins said Lockheed Martin had found alternate solutions to meet IAF requirements for these functions.

    The C-130J order will mark the first induction of US military aircraft into the IAF in over four decades. Lockheed Martin is also in the fray for a number of other defence deals to supply equipment to the Indian Army, Navy and Air Force, and considers its F-16IN a “strong competitor†in the race to sell 126 fighter jets to the IAF, an order expected to be worth $12 billion. Says Prins, “We view the market in India as part of the transformative relationship between India and the US.â€

    Lockheed Martin delivers India's first C-130J aircraft
     
  14. Dilemma

    Dilemma Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Nice. But I guess the planes will arrive in India only sometime before Aero India.
     
  15. Naren1987

    Naren1987 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    The Americans are very efficient, they do deliver on time.
     

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