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United States Military News

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by brain_dead, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. oikare

    oikare Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    I say now 200 F-22 todays strenght to(?) and 600 Super Hornets in close future plannes. 800 air crafts totally in attack defense.
    300 Super Hornets in Navy. 30 per capita in carriers.
    15 + 10 division's of Super Hornets and F-22.
    25 division's in totally in USAF.
    Deliver before 2019 to Air Force those Super Hornets.
     
  2. oikare

    oikare Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    2020-2030 plus maybe until 2035 to out land countries this Super Hornets.

    Finland will haves 30/40/50 Super Hornets first ones 2025 and last ones 2027-2029.

    F-18 C/D operating to 2030 in Finland. Newest before.
     
  3. oikare

    oikare Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    195 F-22 Raptors today.
     
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Navy Forges Ahead With New Surface Ship Electronic Warfare: SEWIP By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr. on March 20, 2015 at 1:51 PM
    [​IMG]
    The Navy’s current shipboard electronic warfare system, the 1970s-vintage AN/SLQ-32
    NAVY YARD: American warships are about to get much harder to kill. Armed with new electronic warfare systems, the US Navy “is taking back the spectrum,” Capt. Doug Small says.
    The great advantage of American warships has long been their ability to absorb punishment and to keep fighting. In the modern era, however, the best defense is electronic: The most powerful (non-nuclear) warhead can’t hurt even the flimsiest ship if its targeting system is deceived into hitting empty water instead. Such defensive deception is precisely the purpose of shipboard jammers, and unlike hull armor, such electronics can be easily added to existing ships.
    Most US ships are still using 1970s-vintage electronic defense, chiefly something called the AN/SLQ-32 (“Slick 32″), which have fallen dangerously behind rapid, globally available advances in electronics. Potential adversaries like Russia and China can equip their anti-ship missiles with targeting radars using frequencies too high for current US defenses to even detect. US Pacific Command is particularly concerned
    “Certain countries on the Eurasian land mass are building weapons that a SLQ-32 will not detect,” Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for resources, Vice Adm. Joseph Mulloy, said at this week’s McAleese Associates/Credit Suisse conference. If US ships face these new missiles without an electronic warfare upgrade, he said, “you will never know when something bad is coming, [and] it’s coming in at a supersonic speed.”
    That threat is driving the Navy’s $5 billion-plus, multi-phase Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program. “I’m buying as many SEWIP advanced modules as I can,” Mulloy said.
    SEWIP Block I mainly replaces 1970s-vintage displays and other obsolete components. The Lockheed Martin-built Block II, which has been tested on the destroyer Bainbridge and — in a somewhat scaled-down version — the Littoral Combat Ship Fort Worth, will upgrade the sensors that detect enemy radar beams. Block III, for which the Navy awarded a $267 million contact to Northrop Grumman in February, will bring the fun part: new jammers.
    What does this all mean militarily?
    “In layman’s terms,” said Capt. Small, who overseas the program for Naval Sea Systems Command, “with SEWIP Block II and the SEWIP Block I [upgrades], I don’t think there’s anything out there we can’t detect any more, and detect at ranges where they need to be detected. With SEWIP Block III, there will not be anything that we know of that we can’t jam and jam effectively.”
     
  5. arulcharles

    arulcharles Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    New submarine delivered to U.S. Navy

    [​IMG]

    The 12th Virginia-class submarine for the U.S. Navy has been delivered ahead of schedule by Huntington Ingalls Industries' Newport News Shipbuilding.

    The John Warner is the eighth Virginia-class Block III ship and the sixth to be constructed by the company. It is named after John Warner, a former U.S. Senator and Secretary of the Navy.

    "This submarine embodies the spirit of Sen. Warner and symbolizes his unwavering support for the Navy and the shipyard," said Jim Hughes, Newport News' vice president of submarines and fleet support. "It's truly special to have a boat named after a living person, and we as shipbuilders are proud to deliver John Warner to the Navy because this submarine will continue Sen. Warner's enduring legacy."

    "Today, we are excited to join the operational fleet and to bring Senator Warner's legacy back to the Navy, carrying on his tradition of service to our nation," said Cmdr. Dan Caldwell, the submarine's commanding officer. "The crew and the ship have performed exceptionally well during the acceptance trials, and we are prepared and excited to conduct the operational missions which await us."

    Virginia-class submarines are 377 feet long and have a submerged speed capability of more than 25 knots.

    According to Huntington Ingalls Industries, nearly 4,000 shipbuilders have worked on the submarine since construction began in 2010.

    The submarine, which successfully completed the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey trials earlier this month, will be commissioned into service on August 1.

    New submarine John Warner delivered to U.S. Navy - UPI.com
     
  6. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    I hope Our ship yards are reading this
     
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  7. arulcharles

    arulcharles Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Sikh student can join US army with beard, turban

    A Sikh college student will be able to join the US Army, without being forced to cut his hair, shave his beard or stop wearing his turban thanks to a Washington court ruling.

    District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson ruled recently that the Army violated Hofstra University student Iknoor Singh's rights when it refused to let him compete for a spot as a contracted member of his college's Reserve Officer Training Corps programme.

    "The court finds that defendants have failed to show that the application of the Army's regulations to this plaintiff and the denial of the particular religious accommodation he seeks further a compelling government interest by the least restrictive means," the judge wrote.

    She added that the Army's refusal to permit Singh to enrol while adhering to "articles of faith" that include his hair and turban "cannot survive the strict scrutiny" of the federal law.

    The Army has given "tens of thousands of exceptions" to its grooming and uniform policies, the judge wrote, and made "successful accommodation of observant Sikhs in the past," noting several who have served with distinction, receiving commendations.

    Jackson said the Army's own research contradicted deputy chief of staff Lt. Gen. James C. McConville's opinion in denying Singh's enrolment request.

    McConville and other Army officials had contended the articles of faith would have an adverse impact on unit cohesion and morale, discipline and health and safety.

    Singh, a resident of Queens in New York, who plans to enrol in the ROTC programme in autumn, told Newsday in a phone interview Monday: "Being told no a handful of times, I didn't give up."

    "I had faith and let things play out," he was quoted as saying. "I'll be going on weekend field exercises, which I wasn't previously able to do. I'm very excited about that."

    The American Civil Liberties Union and advocacy group United Sikhs filed the lawsuit in November, saying the Army's denial violated the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which gives protections for religious-based exercises.

    Army spokeswoman Cynthia O. Smith said in a statement: "The Army is currently examining the court's ruling. The Army takes pride in sustaining a culture where all personnel are treated with dignity and respect and not discriminated against based on race, colour, religion, gender and national origin."

    Sikh student can join US army with beard, turban - www.indianweekender.co.nz
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The above is a college army reserve training program, and its a lower court ruling. I would not read a lot into it. US has hundreds of different religions in the USA, if not more and I doubt if the military is going accommodate all of them and if it does it for one it has to do it for them all.
     
  9. arulcharles

    arulcharles Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    I hope our shipyards would deliver on time
     
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  10. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Has any military target been on time in India, don't think it ever has in the USA.
     
  11. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    I don't think any military time table as been on time
    but 2 decades off, that's has to be some kind of a record
     
  12. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    After 20 years of making project budgets, my best method was to figure ever possible cost to the penny, then double it and that was usually the best method of come close to the actual costs.
     
  13. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Murphys law, every thing allways costs more and takes longer.
     
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  14. arulcharles

    arulcharles Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    US Army already have more than enough soldiers
    Agree
     
  15. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    LIDAR on a pod

    OpenPod™ IRST and OpenPod™ Targeting

    OpenPod™ IRST and OpenPod™ Targeting

    [​IMG]
    Opening a world of mission flexibility
    Transformational system to offer affordable sensor swaps and infrared search and track capability (IRST)

    The OpenPod™ system consists of line-replaceable units and a set of interchangeable sensors that can be swapped out in minutes. Enabled by open architecture principles, the OpenPod™ is the first of its kind to accommodate a range of sensors with one pod.

    IRST and targeting capabilities
    OpenPod™ will be available with targeting and infrared search and track (IRST) packages at launch, followed by communications, LIDAR, 5th-to-4th generation communications and other options in in the future. Because the pod allows for sensor changes without modifications to the aircraft or mission computer, OpenPod™ can always be upgraded independent of the aircraft. That allows for more rapid and affordable upgrades and integration of new technologies.

    OpenPod™ is the next step in sensor evolution for users of the AN/AAQ-28(V) LITENING family of advanced targeting systems. Any LITENING pod can be converted to an OpenPod™, so operators can take full advantage of their existing investments, training and operational experience.
     

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