Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

United States Military News

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by brain_dead, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. Fenrir

    Fenrir FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2017
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    101
    Country Flag:
    Norway
    With the US beefing up its forces in Eastern Europe, additional heavy armor units have been sent to Poland.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    R!CK likes this.
  2. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,128
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    America's Next Secret Weapon (That Can Paralyze a City): Electromagnetic Pulse Artillery Shells
    [​IMG]
    Michael Peck
    January 14, 2017

    TweetShareShare
    [​IMG]
    If the U.S. Army has its way, America’s next secret weapon may be an electromagnetic pulse artillery shell that paralyzes an enemy city.

    These special shells won’t carry high explosive. Instead they will emit EMP bursts, or some other non-kinetic technology, to disrupt the computers, radio communications, Internet links and other ties that bind modern societies. And do so without creating any physical damage.

    This is sort of a twenty-first-century version of the neutron bomb, that notorious Cold War weapon designed to kill Soviet soldiers through a burst of radiation, while inflicting little damage to property. Except this weapon targets the radio frequency networks that keep a nation functioning.

    The concept is expressed in a single paragraph in a new Army research proposal:

    Extensive use of wireless RF [radio frequency] networking for critical infrastructure and communications systems provides an alternative attack vector for the neutralization of an adversary’s underlying industrial, civil, and communications infrastructure without the destruction of the hardware associated with those systems. Advances in munitions-based microelectronics and power technologies make possible the implementation of non-kinetic cyber and electromagnetic – or electronic warfare (EW) – attacks that could be delivered via artillery launched munitions. The precision delivery of the non-kinetic effects (NKE) electronics payload close to the target allows low power operation which limits the geographical extent of impacted systems, and reduces the overall impact on the electromagnetic spectrum.

    In addition, the weapon must fit in a 155-millimeter artillery projectile, with the eventual goal of shrinking the weapon’s size so that a single shell can carry multiple submunitions, each capable of creating electronic havoc.

    However, the proposal does not specify how all this is to be accomplished. A query to the Army didn’t shed much light. In an email response, the project scientist said that the project is “open to a broad range of non-kinetic effects.” In fact, the artillery shells don’t even have to be 155-millimeter, but “maybe any other caliber that has the space to place an electronic subsystem that can be used to neutralize an enemy infrastructure and computer based systems.”

    Nonetheless, some kind of electromagnetic-pulse shell would appear to be a likely candidate. EMPs, those short but intense bursts of radiation that fry electronics, are generated by nuclear weapons. The United States has long been concerned that a nuclear device, especially one detonated at high altitudes, could massively disrupt the electronic fabric of American society.

    However, conventional weapons, such as bombs and missiles, can also generate EMP bursts. North Korea allegedly has such devices, and Russia claims to have equipped aircraft and drones with them, while the Pentagon has been working on high-power microwave weapons for years.

    Whether such microwave weapons are effective or reliable is another matter. But regardless of how the artillery shell disables electronics, what’s interesting is that artillery will be the delivery system.

    Nuclear and nonnuclear EMP bombs, delivered by aircraft or missiles, can be launched at targets hundreds or thousands of miles away. But a shell launched from a 155-millimeter howitzer suggests the targets will only be ten or twenty miles away.

    In other words, what the Army wants is a battlefield weapon for U.S. troops in fairly close proximity to enemy forces. Except that the research proposal isn’t asking for devices that would disrupt, say, Chinese or Russian military command-and-control systems.

    Instead the Army speaks of paralyzing “an adversary’s underlying industrial, civil, and communications infrastructure.” This sounds more like some form of strategic bombing. Or perhaps, it could be used to cripple an enemy city prior to an assault or a siege by U.S. ground troops.

    The fact that the Army also desires a low-power weapon that precisely targets a small geographic area and a specific portion of the electromagnetic spectrum also suggests that the Pentagon is aware of the possibility of collateral damage. An artillery shell that fries the power supply for a government ministry is one thing, but frying the power supply to a hospital or water-treatment plant is another.
     
  3. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,128
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    It would certainly restrict mobility.
     
    Picdelamirand-oil likes this.
  4. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,128
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  5. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,128
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    http://defense-update.com/20170205_sm3block2a_test.html

    US-Japanese Missile – SM-3 Block IIA Scores a Bullseye on 1st Intercept Test
    By Tamir Eshel -
    Feb 5, 2017
    1225
    Share on Facebook

    Tweet on Twitter

    [​IMG]
    The U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA), the Japan Ministry of Defense (MoD), and U.S. Navy sailors aboard USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) successfully conducted a flight test Feb. 3 (Hawaii Standard Time), resulting in the first intercept of a ballistic missile target using the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IIA off the west coast of Hawaii. Photo: MDA by Leah Garton
    The first live intercept test of the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IIA interceptor missile was completed successfully on Friday dawn, off the west coast of Hawaii, proving the design maturity of the most advanced interceptor in the sea-based AEGIS Missile Defense system. The intercept was conducted by the US Navy AEGIS test ship – from the USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) as part of a US-Japanese cooperative development.

    “Today’s test demonstrates a critical milestone in the cooperative development of the SM-3 Block IIA missile,” said MDA Director Vice Adm. Jim Syring. “The missile, developed jointly by a Japanese and U.S. government and industry team, is vitally important to both our nations and will ultimately improve our ability to defend against increasing ballistic missile threats around the world.”






    The flight test designated SM-3 Block IIA Cooperative Development (SCD) Project Flight Test, Standard Missile (SFTM)-01, was the third flight test of the SM-3 Block IIA guided missile, and the first intercept test. At approximately 10:30 p.m., Hawaii Standard Time, Feb. 3 (3:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, Feb. 4) a medium-range ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Kauai, Hawaii. John Paul Jones detected and tracked the target missile with its onboard AN/SPY-1D(V) radar using the Aegis Baseline 9.C2 weapon system. Upon acquiring and tracking the target, the ship launched an SM-3 Block IIA guided missile which intercepted the target. Based on preliminary data the test met its primary objective. Program officials will continue to evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

    The test’s primary objective was a successful intercept. The mission was also designed to evaluate key missile system performance, including the kinetic warhead, divert and attitude control system functionality, nosecone performance, steering control section function, booster performance and separation and the second and third stage rocket motor performance and separation.


    This test also marks the first time an SM-3IIA was launched from an Aegis ship and the first intercept engagement using the Aegis Baseline 9.C2 (BMD 5.1) weapon system. Future flight tests will continue to evaluate system performance, en-route to a 2018 deployment at sea and ashore, in support of the European Phased Adaptive Approach Phase 3.

    The interceptor’s kinetic warhead has been enhanced to best address advanced and emerging threats, with improvements to the search, discrimination, acquisition and tracking functions. The kinetic warhead, along with larger rocket motors, allows SM-3 Block IIA to engage more sophisticated threats and protect larger regions from short- to intermediate-range ballistic missile threats, providing greater operational flexibility.

    The SM-3 Block IIA interceptor is designed to defeat short- to intermediate-range ballistic missile threats. It operates as part of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense system and can be launched from Aegis-equipped ships or Aegis Ashore sites. Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense is the naval component of the U.S. Ballistic Missile Defense System. The MDA and the U.S. Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD program. The Missile Defense Agency’s mission is to develop and deploy a layered Ballistic Missile Defense System to defend the United States, its deployed forces, allies, and friends from ballistic missile attacks of all ranges in all phases of flight.
     
  6. Gessler

    Gessler Mod MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,571
    Likes Received:
    9,076
    Country Flag:
    India
    Grounded: Nearly two-thirds of US Navy’s strike fighters can’t fly
    By: Christopher P. Cavas, February 6, 2017 (Photo Credit: MC2 Brooks Patton/US Navy)

    [​IMG]

    Congress’ inability to pass a budget is hurting the fleet, leaders say

    WASHINGTON — The U.S. Navy’s F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet strike fighters are the tip of the spear, embodying most of the fierce striking power of the aircraft carrier strike group. But nearly two-thirds of the fleet’s strike fighters can’t fly — grounded because they’re either undergoing maintenance or simply waiting for parts or their turn in line on the aviation depot backlog.

    Overall, more than half the Navy’s aircraft are grounded, most because there isn’t enough money to fix them.

    Additionally, there isn’t enough money to fix the fleet’s ships, and the backlog of ships needing work continues to grow. Overhauls — “availabilities” in Navy parlance — are being canceled or deferred, and when ships do come in they need longer to refit. Every carrier overall for at least three years has run long, and some submarines are out of service for prolonged periods, as much as four years or more. One submarine, the Boise, has lost its diving certification and can’t operate pending shipyard work.

    Leaders claim that if more money doesn’t become available, five more submarines will be in the same state by the end of this year.

    The Navy can’t get money to move around service members and their families to change assignments, and about $440 million is needed to pay sailors. And the service claims 15 percent of its shore facilities are in failed condition — awaiting repair, replacement or demolition.

    The bleak picture presented by service leaders is in stark contrast to the Trump administration’s widely talked about plan to grow the Navy from today’s goal of 308 ships to 350 — now topped by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson’s new Force Structure Assessment that aims at a 355-ship fleet. Richardson’s staff is crafting further details on how the growth will be carried out — plans congressional leaders are eager to hear. It seems to many as though the Navy will be showered with money to attain such lofty goals.

    Yet, for now, money is tight, due to several years of declining budgets mandated first by the Obama administration, then Congress, and to the chronic inability of lawmakers to provide uninterrupted funds to the military services and the government at large. Budgets have been cut despite no slackening in the demand for the fleet’s services; and the Navy, to preserve shipbuilding funds, made a conscious choice to slash maintenance and training budgets rather than eliminate ships, which take many years to build and can’t be produced promptly even when funding becomes available.

    Congress has failed for the ninth straight year to produce a budget before the Oct. 1 start of fiscal 2017, reverting to continuing resolutions that keep money flowing at prior year levels. CRs have numerous caveats, however, and many new projects or plans can’t be funded since they didn’t exist in the prior year. There is widespread agreement that CR funding creates havoc throughout the Pentagon and the industrial base that supports it — often substantially driving costs higher to recover from lengthy delays. Yet, like the proverbial weather that everyone talks about but no one can change, there seems to be little urgency in Congress to return to a more businesslike budget profile.

    The current continuing resolution through April 28 marks the longest stop-gap measure since fiscal 1977 — outstripping 2011 by only a couple weeks, noted Todd Harrison, of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in a post on Twitter. This also marks the first CR situation during a presidential transition year.

    And while the talk about building dozens of more ships grabs headlines, it is not at all clear when or even whether Congress will repeal the Budget Control Act — sequestration — which, if unabated, will continue its restrictions to 2021.

    Meanwhile, some details are emerging of the new administration’s efforts to move along the budget process. In a Jan. 31 memorandum, Defense Secretary James Mattis described a three-phase plan that included submission by the Pentagon of a 2017 budget amendment request. The request would be sent to the White House’s Office of Management and Budget by March 1.

    Under the plan, the full 2018 budget request is due to OMB no later than May 1.

    The third phase of the plan involves a new National Defense Strategy and FY2019-2023 defense program, which “will include a new force sizing construct” to “inform our targets for force structure growth,” Mattis said in the memo.

    The services will make their case to Congress this week when the vice chiefs of the Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps testify in readiness hearings before the House Armed Services Committee on Tuesday and the Senate Armed Services Committee the following day.

    The vice chiefs are expected to make their pitches for money that can be spent right away, rather than funds for long-term projects that, with only five months left in the fiscal year even if Congress passes a 2017 budget, can’t be quickly put to use.

    “If we get any money at all, the first thing we’re going to do is throw it into the places we can execute it,” a senior Navy source said Feb. 2. “All of those places are in ship maintenance, aviation depot throughput — parts and spares — and permanent changes of station so we can move our families around and fill the holes that are being generated by the lack of PCS money.”

    The backlog is high. “There’s about $6-8 billion of stuff we can execute in April if we got the money,” the senior Navy source said. “We can put it on contract, we can deliver on it right away.”

    Even if the budget top line is increased, Navy leaders say, the immediate need is for maintenance money, not new ship construction. A supplemental Navy list of unfunded requirements for 2017 that was sent to Congress in early January and is still being revised made it clear that maintenance needs are paramount.

    “Our priorities are unambiguously focused on readiness — those things required to get planes in the air, ships and subs at sea, sailors trained and ready,” a Navy official declared. “No new starts.”

    The dire situation of naval aviation is sobering. According to the Navy, 53 percent of all Navy aircraft can’t fly — about 1,700 combat aircraft, patrol, and transport planes and helicopters. Not all are due to budget problems — at any given time, about one-fourth to one-third of aircraft are out of service for regular maintenance. But the 53 percent figure represents about twice the historic norm.

    The strike fighter situation is even more acute and more remarkable since the aircraft are vitally important to projecting the fleet’s combat power. Sixty-two percent of F/A-18s are out of service; 27 percent in major depot work; and 35 percent simply awaiting maintenance or parts, the Navy said.

    With training and flying hour funds cut, the Navy’s aircrews are struggling to maintain even minimum flying requirements, the senior Navy source said. Retention is becoming a problem, too. In 2013, 17 percent of flying officers declined department head tours after being selected. The percentage grew to 29 percent in 2016.

    Funding shortfalls mean many service members are unable to relocate to take on new assignments. So far in 2017, the Navy said, there have been 15,250 fewer moves compared with 2016.

    Under the continuing resolution, the senior Navy official said, another 14 ship availabilities will be deferred in 2018 — one submarine, one cruiser, six destroyers, two landing ship docks, one amphibious transport dock and three minesweepers. Programs seeking to buy items that were not included in the 2016 budget can’t move forward, including CH-53K helicopters, Joint Air-to-Ground Missiles, Long-Range Anti-Ship Missiles and littoral combat ship module weapons. Many more programs that were to increase 2017 buys over 2016 levels can’t do so.

    And with only five months left in fiscal 2017, even if a budget is passed in late April, there is some talk about a yearlong continuing resolution — a prospect at which the senior Navy official shook his head.

    “The full CR is not a good situation at all,” he said.

    http://www.defensenews.com/articles/grounded-nearly-two-thirds-of-us-navys-strike-fighters-cant-fly
     
  7. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,128
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  8. MUC-Spotter

    MUC-Spotter 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2017
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    143
    Country Flag:
    Germany
    Boeing E-3A Sentry AWACS Boeing 707-300 takeoff

     
  9. MUC-Spotter

    MUC-Spotter 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2017
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    143
    Country Flag:
    Germany
    Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet US NAVY flying Display

     
  10. SvenSvensonov

    SvenSvensonov MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    270
    Country Flag:
    United States
    I'm not sure if this is the right thread for pictures, but here you go.

    [​IMG]
    U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Jan. 31, 2017) Crash and salvage team Sailors carry a training dummy during a flight deck fire drill aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25).

    [​IMG]
    RAMSUND, Norway (Feb. 14, 2017) Senior Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technician Gilberto Delgadillo, center, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, conducts long-range reconnaissance during a dismounted counter-improvised explosive device operation. EODMU-8 is participating in Exercise Arctic Specialist 2017, a multi-national EOD exercise conducted in the austere environments of northern Norway.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 14, 2017) A B-1B Lancer from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, and an F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the "Golden Dragons" of Strike Squadron (VFA) 192 fly over the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). The B-1B is deployed in support of U.S. Pacific Command's Continuous Bomber Presence (CBP) mission. In place since 2004, the CBP missions are conducted by U.S. Air Force bombers such as the B-1B, B-52 Stratofortress and B-2 Spirit in order to provide non-stop stability and security in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. The Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group is on a western Pacific deployment as part of the U.S. Pacific Fleet-led initiative to extend the command and control functions of U.S. 3rd Fleet.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 14, 2017) Marine Corps Pvt.1st Class Juan Perez checks ordnance for tracking numbers on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) during ammunition on-load. During the four-day evolution, America will receive more than 1,200 pallets containing approximately 400 different types of ammunition.

    [​IMG]
    SEA OF JAPAN (Feb. 12, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG 85) refuel an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the "Warlords" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 51. McCampbell is on patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

    [​IMG]
    MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Feb. 13, 2017) Sailors move ordnance aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The ship's carrier strike group is conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet areas of operation in support of U.S. national security interests.

    [​IMG]
    RAMSUND, Norway (Feb. 10, 2017) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD)Technician 2nd Class Tyler McKay, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, prepares to dive during Exercise Arctic Specialist 2017. EODMU-8 is participating in Exercise Arctic Specialist 2017, a multi-national EOD exercise conducted in the austere environments of northern Norway.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 9, 2017) An E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft assigned to the "Black Eagles" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 113 takes off from the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during a change of command ceremony. The Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group is on a western Pacific deployment as part of the U.S. Pacific Fleet-led initiative to extend the command and control functions of U.S. 3rd Fleet.

    [​IMG]
    SOUTH CHINA SEA (Feb. 10, 2017) Sailors prepare an MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned helicopter prior to performing ground turns aboard the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4). The ship is a fast and agile warship tailor-made to patrol the region's littorals and work hull-to-hull with partner navies, providing 7th Fleet with the flexible capabilities it needs now and in the future.
     
    BMD and Gessler like this.
  11. SvenSvensonov

    SvenSvensonov MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    270
    Country Flag:
    United States
    [​IMG]
    GULF OF THAILAND (Feb. 9, 2017) Damage Controlman 3rd Class Lindsey Harman, assigned to the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20), tests the countermeasure wash-down system on the forecastle. Green Bay is on a routine patrol, operating in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region to enhance partnerships and be a ready-response force for any type of contingency.

    [​IMG]
    PUERTO BARRIOS, Guatemala (Feb. 6, 2017) Sailors assigned to Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Fla., and host nation doctors operate on a patient's wrist during Continuing Promise 2017 (CP-17) in Puerto Barrios, Guatemala. CP-17 is a U.S. Southern Command-sponsored and U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet-conducted deployment to conduct civil-military operations including humanitarian assistance, training engagements, medical, dental, and veterinary support to Central and South America.

    [​IMG]
    RAMSUND, Norway (Feb. 8, 2017) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8 Sailors, utilize the Royal Norwegian Navy ship Olav Tryggvason as an afloat forward staging base to conduct cold water diving operations. An adaptive force package commanded by Commander, Task Group 68.1 , EODMU 8 is participating in Exercise Arctic Specialist 2017, a multi-national EOD exercise conducted in the austere environments of northern Norway. U.S. 6th Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied, joint, and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.

    [​IMG]
    SOUDA BAY, Greece (Feb. 8, 2017) The guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) departs Souda Bay, Greece. The ship is forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, is underway conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa.

    [​IMG]
    EVERETT, Wash. (Feb. 4, 2017) Marine Sgt. Spencer Alvarez, an Anchorage, Alaska, native assigned to Naval Station Everett, participates in the 2nd Annual Pacific Northwest Army-Navy ice hockey game at the Xfinity Arena. The Everett Silvertips, a minor league hockey team, hosted the Morale, Welfare, and Recreation sponsored event.

    [​IMG]
    SEA OF JAPAN (Feb. 3, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG 85) clear snow and ice from the ship's forecastle. McCampbell is on patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

    [​IMG]
    RAMSUND, Norway (Feb. 5, 2017) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 8 and the Norwegian Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team participate in a cold-weather endurance ruck march during Exercise Arctic Specialist 2017 in Ramsund, Norway. The exercise is commanded by the Commander of Task Group 68.1 and conducted in the austere environments of northern Norway.

    [​IMG]
    GULF OF ADEN (Jan. 23, 2017) Marines assigned to the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit board Landing Craft, Air Cushion 32, assigned to Assault Craft Unit 5, in the well deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8). The ship is deployed with its amphibious ready group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 3, 2017) Ordnance is transferred to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) by an MH-60S Seahawk, assigned to the Indians of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6, during an ammunition on-load with the dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8). Theodore Roosevelt is currently off the coast of Southern California conducting routine training operations.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 3, 2017) The U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA), the Japan Ministry of Defense (MoD), and U.S. Navy Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) successfully conducted a flight test Feb. 3 (Hawaii Standard Time), resulting in the first intercept of a ballistic missile target using the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IIA off the west coast of Hawaii.
     
    Gessler likes this.
  12. SvenSvensonov

    SvenSvensonov MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    270
    Country Flag:
    United States
    [​IMG]
    APRA HARBOR, Guam (Jan. 11, 2017) Marines assigned to the Maritime Raid Force, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU), climb a caving ladder to board the dry cargo ship USNS Pfc. Dewayne T. Williams (T-AK-3009) at Apra Harbor, Guam. The 31st MEU's air-ground-logistics team provides a flexible force, ready to perform a wide range of military operations, from limited combat to humanitarian assistance operations, throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

    [​IMG]
    SOUTH CHINA SEA (Feb. 2, 2017) An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter, top, and an MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aircraft system make their approach towards the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) during flight operations. Coronado is a fast and agile warship tailor-made to patrol the region's littorals and work hull-to-hull with partner navies, providing the U.S. 7th Fleet with the flexible capabilities it needs now and in the future.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 2, 2017) An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Indians of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6 picks up ordnance from the flight deck of the dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) during an ammunition on-load.

    [​IMG]
    OKINAWA, Japan (Feb. 1, 2017) An amphibious assault vehicle assigned to 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, prepares to embark the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20). The ship is on a routine patrol operating in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region to enhance partnerships and be a ready-response force for any type of contingency.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 2, 2017) Two MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters assigned to the Indians of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6 transfer ordnance between the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and the dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8). Theodore Roosevelt is off the coast of Southern California conducting routine training operations.

    [​IMG]
    BOSPHORUS STRAIT (Feb. 2, 2017) The guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) transits the Bosphorus Strait. Porter is forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe.

    [​IMG]
    IWAKUNI, Japan (Feb. 2, 2017) Five E-2D Advanced Hawkeyes assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125 land onboard Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan. The E-2D is equipped with the most advanced airborne radar in the world, possessing systems which increase the capabilities to defend Japan and provide security in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

    [​IMG]
    ATSUGI, Japan (Jan. 31, 2017) Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Dominic Hopper, assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), fires an M16 during a live-fire qualification. Ronald Reagan, the flagship of Carrier Strike Group 5, provides a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interests of its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

    [​IMG]
    SOUTH CHINA SEA (Jan. 31, 2017) The littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) departs Changi Naval Base for a scheduled underway. The ship is a fast and agile warship tailor-made to patrol the region's littorals and work hull-to-hull with partner navies, providing the U.S. 7th Fleet with the flexible capabilities it needs now and in the future.
     
  13. SvenSvensonov

    SvenSvensonov MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    270
    Country Flag:
    United States
    [​IMG]
    NORFOLK (Jan. 30, 2017) Landing Craft Utility 1655, assigned to Naval Beach Group (NBG) 2, conducts a stern gate marriage with the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). The ship is in port onboard Naval Station Norfolk, Va., preparing for an upcoming deployment.

    [​IMG]
    PUGET SOUND, Wash. (Jan. 27, 2017) The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) arrives at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for a port visit. The crew is visiting Olympia to perform community relations projects and tour the capital.

    [​IMG]
    ARABIAN GULF (Jan. 12, 2017) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Nicholas Flynn hoists Naval Aircrewmen (Helicopter) 2nd Class Landon Hall and Robert Cox onto an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Chargers of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 26 during a search and rescue training exercise. HSC-26 is a forward deployed naval forces asset attached to the Commander of Task Force 53 to provide combat logistics and search and rescue capabilities throughout the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

    [​IMG]
    POHANG, Republic of Korea (Jan. 25, 2017) Republic of Korea (ROK) Marines assigned to ROK 1st Recon Battalion exit an MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter assigned to Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM) 14. The squadron is assisting the ROK 1st Recon Battalion in cold-weather training operations.

    [​IMG]
    MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 29, 2016) An Mark 45 5-inch lightweight gun fires Mark 91 illumination rounds aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64), illuminating the shoreline of Sirte, Libya. Carney is forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, conducting operations in support of the Libyan Government of National Accord-aligned forces against Daesh targets in Sirte, Libya, as part of Operation Odyssey Lightning.

    [​IMG]
    ATLANTIC OCEAN (Jan. 17, 2017) Marines assigned to Battalion Landing Team, 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (24th MEU), carry simulated casualties while conducting a casualty evacuation drill aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS Mesa Verde (LPD 19) during a composite unit training exercise. The training is the 24th MEU's final at-sea evaluation designed for Marines and Sailors to increase operational efficiency before deployment.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 9, 2017) A Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II, assigned to Marine to Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, refuels in flight while transiting the Pacific Ocean on its way to Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, to join the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing. VMFA-121, originally an F/A-18 squadron, was re-designated in 2012 as the Marine Corps' first F-35 squadron.

    [​IMG]
    SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND, Calif. (Jan. 10, 2016) Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 3, Southern California Offshore Range (SCORE) detachment, prepare a training torpedo recovery cage for aircrew familiarization at San Clemente Island, Calif. HSC-3 SCORE detachment provides critical support for tactical range training and testing operations of U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet assets.

    [​IMG]
    BETHESDA, Md. (Nov. 9, 2016) A SeaGlide, or small-scale underwater glider, maneuvers in a tank of water at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division in Bethesda, Md. The SeaGlide is a non-tethered, autonomous robot that helps collect data through sensors.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    NORFOLK (Jan. 7, 2016) Snow falls on the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The ship is pierside following a deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation.
     
    randomradio likes this.
  14. SvenSvensonov

    SvenSvensonov MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    270
    Country Flag:
    United States
    The converted Boom-Crew. Each of the four Ohio SSGNs has had their Sherwood Forest altered to support conventional munitions or special operations lockout/storage/berthing. They are often viewed carrying one or two dry-deck shelters for special forces underwater delivery vehicles or remote operated platforms.

    I'm not going to caption these pictures because they all depict the same thing, just not the same boat.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    randomradio and Gessler like this.
  15. SvenSvensonov

    SvenSvensonov MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    270
    Country Flag:
    United States
    [​IMG]
    SULU SEA (Feb. 20, 2017) An MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned helicopter prepares to land aboard the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) following completion of routine operations in the Sulu Sea near the Balabac Strait. Coronado is specifically designed for this type of maritime security and counter-piracy operations and has a Surface Warfare mission package comprised of two 11-meter rigid-hull inflatable boats, two visit, board, search and seizure boarding teams, two 30 mm machine guns, two Northrop-Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicles, and a Lockheed-Martin MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter.

    [​IMG]
    SOUTH CHINA SEA (Feb 21, 2017) Sailors use exercise equipment in one of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) fitness centers.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 21, 2017) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) fires the close-in weapon system during a live-fire exercise.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 21, 2017) Damage Controlman Fireman Aaron Working, from Orange Park, Fla., uses a Naval Firefighting Thermal Imaging device to find simulated hotspots in a smoke-filled room during a general quarters drill aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112).

    [​IMG]
    SOUTH CHINA SEA (Feb. 19, 2017) A rigid-hull inflatable boat is hoisted onto the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) following completion of a visit, board, search and seizure exercise.

    [​IMG]
    MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Feb. 18, 2017) The fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6), center, is underway with the Danish navy frigate HDMS Peter Willemoes (F 362) and the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) during a replenishment-at-sea.

    [​IMG]
    PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 18, 2017) Sailors extract a dummy from a training jet during a mass causality drill aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71).

    [​IMG]
    GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba (Feb. 19, 2017) A Seabee assigned to Underwater Construction Team (UCT) 1 conducts a surface supplied dive during diver-qualification training off the coast of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. UCT-1 provides a capability for construction, inspection, repair and maintenance of ocean facilities in support of Naval operations

    [​IMG]
    OKINAWA, Japan (Feb. 17, 2017) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5 make their way across a wire bridge which is one of the 31 obstacles that make up the endurance course at the Jungle Warfare Training Center onboard Camp Gonsalves in Okinawa, Japan. NMCB-5 is the forward deployed western Pacific NMCB ready to support major combat operations, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations, and to provide general engineering and civil support to Navy, Marine Corps, and joint operational forces.

    [​IMG]
    GULF OF ADEN (Feb. 17, 2017) Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Deveion Acker climbs a ladderwell aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) during a general quarters drill.

    [​IMG]
    FALLON, Nev. (Feb. 10, 2017) Sailors assigned to the search and rescue team onboard Naval Air Station Fallon conduct cliff side rescue training exercises with an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter.
     
    randomradio likes this.

Share This Page