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Discussion in 'The Americas' started by brain_dead, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  2. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    http://www.defenseone.com/threats/2...old-missile-defense-idea/139267/?oref=d-river

    Spooked by North Korea, Lawmakers Resurrect an Old Missile-Defense Idea
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    • [​IMG]BY CAROLINE HOUCKSTAFF CORRESPONDENT AT DEFENSE ONEREAD BIO
    JULY 7, 2017

    TOPICS

    LEAH GARTON/MDA

    AA FONT SIZE + PRINT
    Technical experts say space-based interceptors haven’t gotten any more practical since the Reagan era, but House lawmakers still want the Pentagon to plan for them.

    There’s not much Washington can do about North Korea’s quest for a nuclear-tipped ballistic missile that can hit a U.S. city, and so lawmakers might be forgiven for dusting off an idea that’s been around since the Reagan era: a space-based interceptor system.

    That may be a cool mental image — “this idea that we’d have these orbiting sentinels that would protect the country,” but the “mundane reality” is far different, said Jeffrey Lewis, the founder of Arms Control Wonk and a professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies.

    The idea, in brief: The U.S. would launch and maintain low-Earth-orbit satellites armed with interceptors to shoot down enemy ballistic missiles during their boost phase, when they’re slowest and most vulnerable.

    This defensive network would “augment and supplement” terrestrial systems by “reducing the number of targets requiring midcourse interception,” according to a recent report from the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

    There are several reasons the idea works better in theory than in practice — more on those later — and the Pentagon hasn’t seriously looked into the possibility since the 1990s. But with Pyongyang’s hostile behavior on lawmakers’ minds, some of them say it’s time to revisit the idea.

    In this year’s defense bill, the House Armed Services Committee added $30 million to the Missile Defense Agency’s 2018 budget request to start developing a space-based interceptor layer to guard against a given region.

    “The threat from the world’s most dangerous weapons has indeed never been greater, and now is the time to finally build a space-based missile defense layer to cover the gaps and seams in our missile defense architecture,” Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., said during the defense bill’s markup last week.

    Franks’ amendment adding that money also requires the MDA to deliver a plan for space-based interceptors to the committee within a year, and to establish a “space test bed” to look into options.

    The idea has resurfaced again and again, almost like a zombie, said Theresa Hitchens, a researcher at the Center for International & Security Studies at Maryland. The 2016 National Defense Authorization Act directed the MDA to assess space-based defenses as an alternative to the U.S.’s current ground-based missile defense system.

    “It keeps resurrecting itself — it gets killed and gets back up again,” Hitchens said. “There are a lot of people in Congress and in the Republican Party that have had this goal for space-based defense interceptors since the Reagan era, and in some ways…it’s kind of like finding the holy grail.”

    These days, there’s another driving factor, she said: “People are freaked out about North Korea.”

    Franks confirmed that’s why he offered his amendment.

    “It’s time to assume, according to [outgoing MDA Director Vice] Adm. [James] Syring, that North Korea can reach the United States with a nuclear warhead,” Franks said last week. “With some of the things that are coming in our direction…we’re going to have to get left-of-launch and get into boost phase, and space is our opportunity to do that.”




    Follow
    [​IMG]Rep. Trent Franks

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    We took the single biggest step since Reagan in preventing a nuclear attack by passing the space-based missile defense layer amendment #NDAA

    5:09 AM - 29 Jun 2017
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    His amendment calls for a regionally focused space-based layer to complement the terrestrial system. But experts say physics simply doesn’t allow this. If you want to park a satellite over North Korea, you can put it in geosynchronous orbit, some 22,000 miles up. But that’s too far away to react to a missile launch; your interceptors must be much closer to the ground. But satellites in low-Earth orbit race around the globe; any given interceptor would be within range of North Korea for just a few minutes at a time.

    “Basically, to build a space-based interceptor system, you have to provide approximately global defense for the entire world,” Lewis said. ”And it’s a really thin layer, unless you put many, many, many satellites.…It’s just the math of putting so many satellites in orbit to get such a thin layer of defense almost never works.”

    The financial math of space operations has changed since the idea was proposed 30 years ago, thanks to the advent of commercial launches and lower-cost satellites. But not enough to remove launch costs as a real limitation on any program, according to CSIS’s report. Especially since an operationally sufficient layer of satellites would still need to be reinforced by more interceptors to guard against mechanical failure or enemy attack.

    “Somebody on the ground can shoot down one or two of those things, and there’s a hole in your ability to catch that outgoing ballistic missile,” Hitchens said. “I don’t think you can overcome this problem of the absentee ratio and the fact that it’s a lot cheaper to shoot something up at a satellite, including one that’s carrying a space-based missile defense interceptor, than it is to actually put those things up there.”

    Franks’ office said his proposed regionally focused system would cost $20 billion to $30 billion over three decades. CSIS estimated a space-based intercept layer would cost between $67 billion to $109 billion.

    There are also geopolitical concerns about such a system. Though lawmakers may envision it as a mitigation strategy for North Korea and other erratic regimes, it would affect the calculations China and Russia make about their own nuclear deterrents.

    Still, it’s a necessary step to safeguard not only the U.S.homeland from North Korea, but also U.S. assets in space and current defenses, Franks and other supporters say.

    First, however, the proposal would have to make it into the bicameral version of the defense bill. The Senate’s version of the NDAA includes no money for the MDA to develop space-based interceptors or create a testbed for relevant technologies.[​IMG]
     
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  3. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    The old Mirage F1 at the ATAC of the United States!

    https://translate.google.fr/transla...-f1-francais-a-l-atac-743632.html&prev=search
     
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  4. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    http://defense-update.com/20170711_thaad_1.html

    THAAD Succserfully Intercepts an IRBM Target from Alaska
    By
    Tamir Eshel

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    THAAD interceptor seen here launched on its tenth test flight. Photo: MDA
    U.S. missile defense capabilities were demonstrated today in a first of a kind intercept of an Intermediate-Range Ballistic Missile (IRBM) target by the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system. The intercept took place 2,500 miles south of Alaska, near Hawaii, demonstrating THAAD’s strategic defense capabilities, particularly against the threat types currently presented from North Korea.

    “The successful demonstration of THAAD against an IRBM-range missile threat bolsters the country’s defensive capability against developing missile threats in North Korea and other countries around the globe and contributes to the broader strategic deterrence architecture,” MDA said in the statement. Although the test was planned months ago, the U.S. missile defense test has gained significance following North Korea’s July 4 launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that raised concerns about the threat from Pyongyang.


    The successful intercept was part of a test led by the U.S. Missile Defense Agency, supported by the the U.S. Army, which operates the THAAD. Through the test event the THAAD system, located at Pacific Spaceport Complex Alaska in Kodiak, Alaska, detected, tracked and intercepted a threat-representative IRBM target. This was the first test where THAAD attempted to challenged an IRBM. This was the 14th successful intercept in 14 attempts for the THAAD system since 2005.

    During the test site’s SPY-2 radar detected, acquired and tracked the target. Based on that input The THAAD system then developed a fire control solution and launched an interceptor that destroyed the target’s reentry vehicle with the sheer force of a direct collision.

    The Kodiak site is not new to missile defense tests but has not been used since 2014. The current test was part of renewed activity on the site, under a $90 million contract awarded by MDA. Upcoming missile defense activities also include a planned test of an Arrow 3 interceptor, expected to verify the systems’ full capacity, which could not be tested in the confines of Israel’s coastal test range on the Mediterranean Sea.

    The system can operate as a self-sustained unit or as part of a larger, multi-tier missile defense layout. It is rapidly deployable, mobile and also interoperable with other Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) elements, including Patriot/PAC-3, Aegis, forward-based sensors and the Command, Control, Battle Management, and Communications system.

    THAAD has been deployed since 2009, in the USA, the Middle East, and South Korea. The system has also been on the US export list, for UAE and Saudi Arabia, the later facing constant missile attacks from Iranian-supported Houties from Yemen.
     
  5. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    http://www.kratosusd.com/capabilities/unmanned-tactical-systems/utap-22

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    Based upon the proven success of the U.S. Air Force BQM-167A aerial target, the Kratos Unmanned Tactical Aerial Platform (UTAP-22) provides the warfighter with an affordable, unmanned tactical aircraft that is capable of fighter-like performance and collaborative operations with manned assets in contested environments.

    The UTAP-22 has successfully flown independent and collaborative operations with a manned fighter aircraft, and is ready for sensor integration as well as deployed operations. Superior maneuverability and payload versatility are key features that make the UTAP-22 the ultimate wingman for high-performance manned/unmanned teaming operations in contested airspace.

    Quick Contact

    Quick Facts

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    http://www.kratosusd.com/capabilities/unmanned-tactical-systems/xq-222

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    Representing a clean-sheet, low-cost UAS solution, the XQ-222 is changing the paradigm for tactical UAS technology. The XQ-222 delivers a combination of long-range, high-speed, and maneuverability, along with the capability of delivering a mix of lethal weapons from its internal bomb bay and wing stations.

    Equally adept in the role of Strike or Air-to-Air UAS, the XQ-222 is the future for manned/unmanned teaming and is the affordable alternative for ISR, Strike, Air-to-Air or EA missions. Runway-independence and extreme range deliver maximum operational flexibility and utility to the Warfighter.

    Quick Contact

    Quick Facts

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  6. sunstersun

    sunstersun Lieutenant IDF NewBie

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    Lockheed is a beast company. Seriously, THAAD along with all with the rest of their shit.
     
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  7. sunstersun

    sunstersun Lieutenant IDF NewBie

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  8. sunstersun

    sunstersun Lieutenant IDF NewBie

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  9. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/e90d33b0-97ce-3d3a-a5f2-5f8c779c0dcb/ss_the-us-army's-main-battle.html

    The US Army's main battle tank is getting a new, high-tech, multipurpose 120 mm round




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    The US Army's main battle tank is getting a new, high-tech, multipurpose 120 mm round
    The Army is now engineering a new Advanced Multi-Purpose 120 mm ammunition round for a far-superior M1A2 SEP v4 Abrams tank variant for the 2020s and beyond — designed to be more lethal, faster, lighter weight, better protected, equipped with new sensors and armed with upgraded, more effective weapons, service officials said. The new ammunition will replace four different kinds of ammunition with a single round. The AMP round will replace four tank rounds now in use. The first two are the M830, High Explosive Anti-Tank, or HEAT, round and the M830A1, Multi-Purpose Anti -Tank, or MPAT, round. The latter round was introduced in 1993 to engage and defeat enemy helicopters, specifically the Russian
     
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  10. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    A new 10 mega joule medium-range multi-mission railgun developed by General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems is ready for testing, according to the company. Designed to provide multi-mission, multi-domain capability with greater flexibility and a smaller footprint for ship, land and mobile platforms, the firm stated that field testing of the system will be conducted at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, however, they did not disclose when the system will be tested. The railgun integrates a High Energy Pulsed Power Container, 10 MJ launcher, hypersonic hybrid missile, and fire control technologies. The HEPPC uses next-generation railgun capacitors and a new approach to packaging and distribution of the energy in a smaller footprint than existing pulsed power solutions.
     
  12. Hjörþrimul

    Hjörþrimul FULL MEMBER

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    P-8 Poseidon tar av fra Andøya flystasjon.

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    Flaggskipet i SNMG1, KNM Otto Sverdrup foran andre fartøy i flåtestyrken under øvelsen Saxon Warrior 2017.

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    Et helikopter fra SNMG1 styrken under øvelse Saxon Warrior 2017.

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  13. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    ‘Rolling The Marble:’ BG Saltzman On Air Force’s Multi-Domain C2 System By Colin Clark on August 08, 2017 at 6:00 PM

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    The last generation of Command and Control, the Air Force Combined Air Operations Center

    PENTAGON: In his first interview, the man overseeing the Air Force’s attempt to build the first truly global command and control system says it will demand major changes to the US military.

    Multi-Domain Command & Control will demand changes to how America commands its troops around the world, to acquisition, to Air Force culture and its personnel system, and to the state of the art in military software.

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    Gen. Chance “Salty” Saltzman

    It will even affect the current combatant commander (COCOM) construct, Brig. Gen. Chance “Salty” Saltzman told me: “We are going to have to relook at some basic principles going forward.”

    Why? The brave new world of cyber war demands incredibly rapid analysis, recommendations and actions. It’ll probably be a decade before the US boasts a really effective means of visualizing cyber attacks on a global scale. Now add the need to make sense of war in space. Add air war. Add sea war. Add land war. Add a sprinkle of Saltzman, who’s been charged with getting the Air Force ready to build its Multi-Domain Command and Control system (MDC2).

    “It’s all about algorithms. It’s about software making sense of it all for you,” Saltzman says. One of Bob Work’s last major initiatives as Deputy Defense Secretary was to launch a task force on “algorithmic warfare,” the use of artificial intelligence to make sense of masses of data. The ultimate goal, the holy grail, is what we call the War Algorithm: software that can sort through the complexities of modern war and show commanders the way to victory.

    Guided by all this data, coordinated attacks will converge on the enemy from all domains — the land, sea, air, space, and cyberspace. “We want to put our enemy into as many dilemmas as possible,” Saltzman said.

    The MDC2 team has done tabletop games to figure out how to integrate data from a huge array of sources, including civilian ones. The 505th Command and Control Wing at Hurlburt Field Air Force Base held what an official Air Force news story yesterday called “a ground-breaking exercise” July 17-21 with subject matter experts from around the world to help hammer out the “concept of multi-domain command and control.” And another major war game is in the works for 2018 to test concepts and help build initial goals for the system, Saltzman says.

    Building, using and understanding a system this advanced will probably force the Air Force to create a speciality so that promising officers and enlisted can remain with MDC2 for much of their career, Saltzman believes: “We need to formalize and professionally develop a cadre for operational C2.” (They’d wear a black uniform with large feathered cap, he joked.) He’s still figuring out how best to do this.

    The action plan — the first set of recommendations — on MDC2’s path ahead will be presented to Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein in November, Saltzman says.

    [​IMG]
    Foreign liaison personnel in their cloistered section of Central Command’s Combined Air Operations Center (CAOC).

    All Domains, All Services, All Allies, All Agencies

    The Air Force and the other services face enormous obstacles as they begin building multi-domain command and control systems. They have to tap both the Intelligence Community and their own sensors, weapons and troops, fuse the information, and finally provide commanders around the world with actionable information they can use to confuse and defeat the enemy.

    Complicating this is the need to pull that data from multiple domains (hence the name). The Air Force plans to incorporate data from space, air, sea and land around the globe and then to distribute that data to commanders wherever they need it. “If there’s a data source out there, I don’t want it to be excluded,” he says.

    To that end, all four services are represented on the 130-strong MDC2 team, including an Army colonel and a Navy captain. There are also five foreign officers from Australia, Britain and Canada — all members of the Five Eyes nations that share top-level intelligence — to make sure that allied integration is as effective as possible. One of the team leads, Group Commander Blythe Crawford, is a British officer. Saltzman tells me he’s briefed the French military. Soon, the rest of NATO will be briefed.

    To reach out beyond US and foreign militaries, Saltzman says he and his people are looking to the experience of the National Space Defense Center (formerly known as the JICPSOC), which combines all data from space assets of the Intelligence Community and the US military. Space warfare requires excellent sensor data and it needs to be gathered, analyzed and acted on in double-quick time, especially given the speed of cyber and electronic warfare attacks.

    It’s not just militaries that need to get involved: It’s private industry as well. Since software development is central to building MDC2, Saltzman says the military needs to lower barriers to small companies so they have the same sort of access as large companies such as Google, Lockheed Martin and the other defense primes traditionally can claim.

    They’re also creating what he calls a Shadow Ops Center — sort of an Apple Store — so that MDC2 evolves at the speed of commercial software instead of at the speed of the Pentagon’s traditional acquisition system. The ops center will be linked through nodes at Nellis, Langley, Hanscom, Wright-Patterson Air Force Bases and to the Pentagon’s DIUX centers. Another key to the speedier adoption of technology is DevOps, the approach to software development used by most Silicon Valley companies.

    Add all this up and you’ve got what Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski, head of Air Force Materiel Command, calls agile acquisition. Pawlikowski leads the overall charge to build Penetrating Counter Air, MDC2 and future key Air Force weapon systems.

    [​IMG]
    Former Defense Secretary Bill Perry

    The Art of Making Marbles

    One important point needs mentioning here. MDC2 is not going to be a weapon system so much as a process for putting one together and keeping it useful. Saltzman says he wants to put the “machinery in place to make marbles; not just provide the chief with some marbles.” This is a reference to a famous meeting where Lockheed Martin’s Ben Rich sat down with then Defense Secretary Bill Perry, took a marble out of his pocket and put it on the table to illustrate how small

    This is how Goldfein described what happened next at this year’s February AFA meeting in Orlando: “He rolled it across the table. Secretary Perry said “what’s that?” He said ‘that’s the radar cross section I’m about to build you’ And the rest, as they say, is history. So what’s the moral of the story?….We’ve got to be the organization that accepts the marble, and acts on it. And for industry, the marble I’m asking you to roll our way is getting at Multi-Domain Command and Control.”

    MDC2, PCA (Penetrating Counter-Air), PEW (Penetrating Electronic Warfare) and the OA-X close air support plane are the first projects started as part of the service’s Strategic Development Planning Experimentation, which Pawlikowksi oversees. (We’ll see the flyoff for OA-X at Holloman Air Force Base on Wednesday.)

    The small team that leads the SDPE brings in intelligence experts and technologists to work out concepts of operations for the prospective capability. They then bring in warfighters to have a look. They run war games to test it. They go back and tear the initial concepts apart, then keep pressing to make sure they come up with a blend of technologies and capabilities that should be able to stand the test of time and meet predicted threats come 2030.

    Once a concept is identified as a capability gap, the Air Force then creates an Enterprise Capability Collaboration Team (ECCT) to examine the best ways to fill the gap. This is exactly what Saltzman and his team are doing today.
     
  14. Hjörþrimul

    Hjörþrimul FULL MEMBER

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    Fotos fra øvelsen Saxon Warrior 2017.

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    That ship on the far right... so handsome:smitten:.
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    The US, UK and Norway. Add Canada and that's exactly the kind of cooperation I'd love to see furthered.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Army: 50 kW Laser Stryker By 2021, 100 kW FMTV Truck By 2022
    By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr., Thursday, August 10, 2017 4:22 PM

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    HUNTSVILLE, ALA.: The Army keeps putting more powerful lasers on smaller vehicles. Battlefield lasers in testing today can shoot down snooping quadcopters and other small drones. By the early 2020s, however vehicles mobile enough to keep up with combat brigades – Strykers and FMTV trucks – will have power in the 50 to 100 kilowatt…
     

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