Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

United States Military News

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by brain_dead, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. MUC-Spotter

    MUC-Spotter 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2017
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    145
    Country Flag:
    Germany
    70th Anniversary USAF Flypast F-15 F-16 KC-135 C-130

     
  2. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    ThunderDrone: Best Name Ever, But What Is It? By Colin Clark on August 16, 2017 at 4:00 AM

    [​IMG]


    DARPA’s Gremlins program concept

    HOLLOMAN AFB: We first heard about ThunderDrone from Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, who told a mystified audience that the Air Force would take part in an event none of us had ever heard of.

    “In two months, we’re going to have a big competition. They’ve rented out a big warehouse,” Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson said here during her Wednesday speech kicking off the Light Attack Experiment. “It’s a rapid prototyping event, and basically it’s to investigate swarms and platforms and effects and data science of small unmanned aerial vehicles. There’s even one (event) that says, ‘Ok, bring your stuff, we’ll see who the last drone standing is.’”

    [​IMG]
    Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson

    Wilson obviously considers ThunderDrone another example of the service’s pursuit of disruptive and useful technologies. So we kept asking three and four-star generals at the Light Attack Experiment here, what is ThunderDrone? They all deferred to the secretary.

    Luckily, the Internet revealed all. OK, at least a bit. It’s being managed by an organization called SOFWERX on behalf of Special Operations Command (SOCOM).

    SOFWERX was created by the Doolittle Institute, a Florida nonprofit with a license to use Gen. Doolitle’s name. The five-year-old institute was clearly created to help SOCOM push the technology envelope “and find solutions to the toughest Science and Technology challenges while championing science, technology, engineering and mathematics education for all levels of society.” The goal of SOFWERX is “to assist with collaboration, innovation, prototyping and exploration with industry, labs and academic partners.” They’ve got two facilities in Tampa. One is a 10,000 sq. ft. facility “designed for collaboration, innovation and modest rapid prototyping,” and the other is a 4,000 sq. ft. “garage designed for rapid prototyping with modest collaboration and innovation capabilities.”

    The material online says the “high-intensity, short-duration collision event” known as ThunderDrone (we can’t use the name often enough) focuses on swarm technologies. The drones they want to see will use modular payloads, capable of ISR, jamming and counter-drone activities. The final event on Nov. 1-3 will test the various contenders. It is, refreshingly, called a “prototype rodeo.”

    I pinged Sofwerx, who are managing the event for Special Operations Command. They referred me to SOCOM, from whom we are eagerly awaiting a response.
     
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    August 30, 2017: More than three years after the British RAF (Royal Air Force) retired its nine L-1011 transports (six aerial refueling tankers and three cargo transports) it has sold off all of them, despite their 30 years of military service. The L-1011s were replaced by A-330 MRTT tankers. The L-1011 tankers were still in good shape when retired and the RAF knew that they would eventually sell. Interested buyers showed up within a year of retirement but it took three years to find buyers for all of them. The last six (four tankers and two cargo models) were purchased by an American commercial operation TAS (Tempus Applied Solutions) that will put three of the L-1011s back to work as commercial aerial tankers while the other three L-1011 used for spare parts. Thus three of these aerial tankers will continue to service military aircraft but now as a contractor rather than part of an air force.

    This sort of thing is nothing new and has been increasing popular since the 1990s. One of the first commercial aerial refueling services, Omega Air, used two Boeing 707s (the civilian version of the KC-135) and a converted DC-10 for aerial refueling and over a decade ago was delivering fuel at less than half of what it cost the U.S. Air Force (about $5 dollars a liter/$20 a gallon) using KC-135s and KC-10s.

    TAS already supplies helicopters, UAVs and transports for the military. These are used for training, cargo and passenger transports and other tasks outside of combat zones. It has become quite common to use civilian contractors for these tasks, often using former military pilots, because it is cheaper and easier to cut back or increase use of these civilian aircraft rather than military owned and operated ones.

    A growing number of countries besides Britain and the United States also outsource for some of their aerial refueling needs. They do this because the Americans, in particular, have a lot of experience with this sort of thing. For example the U.S. Navy has been using Omega since 2001, as have some foreign air forces. The navy keeps renewing the Omega contract each year, indicating satisfaction with the arrangement. The navy uses Omega a lot for training exercises or long distance movement of combat aircraft that would be a hassle to reschedule if the air force tankers were delayed because of air force refueling needs.

    The U.S. Navy, which often depends on U.S. Air Force KC-135 aerial tankers to refuel its aircraft in combat zones has sometimes also found it more convenient to use a civilian firm for aerial refueling service in the United States. The air force controls all the large tankers (the navy can use some smaller aircraft, even fighters, for refueling in a pinch) and makes them available to the navy and other foreigners only when the air force has taken care of its own needs. Thus, non-air force users must sometimes wait. Omega Air allows the navy to avoid the wait by using commercial aerial tankers and many other nations are finding it useful to follow this example.
     
  4. sunstersun

    sunstersun Lieutenant IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    May 12, 2017
    Messages:
    653
    Likes Received:
    352
    Country Flag:
    Canada
  5. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,790
    Likes Received:
    3,012
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Navy_contracts_Orbital_ATK_for_additional_AARGM_missiles_999.html

    Navy contracts Orbital ATK for additional AARGM missiles
    by Richard Tomkins
    Washington (UPI) Sep 27, 2017

    [​IMG]


    Orbital ATK announced Wednesday a U.S. Navy contract to continue full-rate production of AGM-88E advanced anti-radiation guided missiles.

    The contract, worth $359 million, included an initial award of $157 million for Lot Six full-rate production of the missiles and an option for Lot Seven.

    "Today's battlefield is rapidly evolving and the number of threats emerging around the world continues to grow," Cary Ralston, vice president and general manager of Orbital ATK's Defense Electronic Systems Division, said in a press release.

    "AARGM is an affordable solution that provides advanced capabilities to those protecting our nation and allies each and every day."

    The AARGM is a supersonic, air-launched tactical missile system that upgrades legacy AGM-88 HARM system. It is able to engage traditional and non-traditional advanced land- and sea-based air-defense threats and time-sensitive targets.

    Orbital ATK said the contract covers all-up round missiles and captive air training missiles for the U.S. Navy, Italian Air Force and other allies through Foreign Military Sales program. The missile is integrated into the weapons systems on the FA-18C/D Hornet, FA-18E/F Super Hornet and EA-18G Growler aircraft.
     
  6. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Rumors of Secret Warplanes Preceded Mach 6 SR-72 Spyplane Reveal
    [​IMG]
    Kyle Mizokami
    ,
    The National InterestOctober 1, 2017
    Kyle Mizokami">Kyle Mizokami



    [​IMG]<img
    Rumors of Secret Warplanes Preceded Mach 6 SR-72 Spyplane Reveal

    Lockheed Martin’s 2013 announcement of a proposed SR-72 reconnaissance and strike drone comes against a backdrop of decades of rumor about a replacement for America’s high-speed SR-71 spy plane. The SR-72 reportedly appeared for the first time in plain view in July 2017.

    Since the early 1990s, there have been reports of mysterious sonic booms, unidentified aircraft sightings and a mysterious aircraft on a wall chart at Lockheed Martin.

    The existence of an early replacement for the SR-71—which was permanently retired in 1998—has never been verified. Aviation buffs call the apparently mythical plane Aurora. It’s the Bigfoot of the aviation world.

    The story of Aurora began in 1990, when Aviation Week & Space Technology mentioned that “Aurora” had been a line item in the U.S. defense budget in 1986 for “black aircraft production.” Aurora funding allegedly reached $2.3 billion in 1986, prompting speculation that a replacement for the SR-71 was in the works.

    Recommended: The Case for War with North Korea'>Recommended: The Case for War with North Korea

    The name stuck, and the chase was on. But was it an Aurora chase, or a wild goose chase?

    Black projects">Black projects

    In 1988, The New York Times reported that a successor to the SR-71 was being developed—one capable of flying at Mach 5. The SR-71 was pulled out of service two years later and made a brief comeback in the late 1990s.

    Recommended: China's New Stealth Fighter Has Arrived

    In the early ’90s, a series of mysterious sonic booms began rattling the California coastline, noises that defied easy explanation. To this day, sonic booms are still reported across swathes of southern California. One such report from April 2009 was investigated by the local press, which could find no explanation for it.

    Many are undoubtedly from natural phenomena, such as meteorites entering Earth’s atmosphere. But some of these sonic booms are obviously from run-of-the-mill military sources. And Aurora watchers have their own explanation. The booms are from Aurora returning to bases in southern California after flying over the Pacific Ocean.

    Whatever was creating the sonic booms, they were picked up by California’s earthquake monitoring network. Designed to record tremors in the Earth, seismographs monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey have inadvertently picked up the booms. In 2001, a paper produced at the the California Institute of Technology ‘s Graduate Aeronautical Labs analyzed the booms and concluded that whatever they were, they came from some unknown, offshore event.

    Recommended: America Can't Shoot Down a North Korean Nuke

    The regularity begs two questions. If the sonic booms are a natural phenomenon, why were they suddenly occurring now? Second, if the booms were made by the U.S. military, as they occasionally are, why is the military unable to explain them?

    There have also been sightings of mysterious aircraft attributed to Aurora. In 1989, Chris Gibson, a veteran plane watcher and former member of the Royal Observer Corps, reported seeing a mysterious aircraft while stationed on an oil rig in the North Sea. Gibson reported the aircraft resembled an isosceles triangle and was accompanied by a KC-135 tanker aircraft.

    In 1992, aviation enthusiast Stephen Douglass photographed what came to be known as “donuts on a rope” contrails. The unusual contrails were said to be accompanied by an unusual, pulsating engine roar. Both have been attributed by Aurora buffs to the use of pulse-detonated wave engine technology allegedly used by Aurora to achieve hypersonic speeds.


    In 1992, Aviation Week reported that military-monitoring hobbyists had listened in on an exchange between Edwards Air Force Base and an unknown, high-altitude aircraft identified as “Gaspipe.” Edwards aircraft controllers could be overheard advising “Gaspipe” that it was being tracked at 67,000 feet—far above the normal operating altitude of military aircraft, where flight crews of the U-2 and SR-71 typically wear pressurized flight suits. The Air Force confirmed that neither U-2 nor SR-71 aircraft were being controlled at those times.

    Then it got even weirder.

    In the late 1990s, journalist Nick Cook of Jane’s Defence Weekly traveled to Lockheed’s famed Skunk Works to interview its head, Jack Gordon, and tour the facility. He later recounted a mysterious incident that left him scratching his head.

    “Just before I left the [Skunk Works] building, I stopped in front of a large chart on the wall of the lobby area,” Cook wrote. “I hadn’t noticed it on the way in. It proudly illustrated the lineage of every Skunk Works aircraft since the XP-80. Past the picture of the U-2, past the SR-71 Blackbird and the F-117A Stealth Fighter, past the YF-22 and DarkStar, and there was something called ‘Astra.'”

    “Sitting at the top of the tree, Astra looked like an ultra-high-speed reconnaissance aircraft,” Cook added, “every pundit’s dream of how Aurora ought to look.”

    Cook asked Lockheed’s press representative what “Astra” was, and weeks later was told it was a 30-year-old “concept for a high-speed airliner.”

    That a 30-year-old concept plane would be at the top of a tree of Skunk Works aircraft is … peculiar.

    Part of the reason Aurora has fascinated so many for so long is because—piecing together various sightings, rumors and reports—a timeline emerges that looks like the developmental and operational timeline of a real aircraft.

    That, and people like things that go real fast.

    Could the SR-72—which Lockheed Martin has designed to fly at speeds up to Mach 6—represent an aerospace program that has existed for some time in the world of secret “black” aircraft programs, and is now being pushed into the “white” world of public programs? If so, why now?

    Finally, one has to ask. Given the importance of strategic reconnaissance flights to the U.S. military, why wouldn’t a replacement to the SR-71 have been built a long time ago? Why does the plane announced by the Skunk Works today look like Aurora concept art from 20 years ago, and why does something just like it appear on the wall at the Skunk Works alongside operational aircraft?

    Maybe there was no Aurora all along. Or maybe Lockheed’s 2013 announcement — and the July 2017 sighting — means there finally will be an Aurora, just 20 years late.
     
  7. MUC-Spotter

    MUC-Spotter 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2017
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    145
    Country Flag:
    Germany
    Thunderbirds USAF flying an Rehearsal Training Display RIAT 2017 AirShow

     
  8. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,790
    Likes Received:
    3,012
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    https://www.defensenews.com/digital...lockheed-unveils-tr-x-as-next-generation-u-2/

    Lockheed Unveils ‘TR-X’ As Next-Generation U-2
    By: Lara Seligman   September 15, 2015
    15
    [​IMG]

    WASHINGTON — Lockheed Martin this week revealed its Skunk Works proposal for a next-generation U-2 spy plane, a tactical reconnaissance aircraft called "TR-X."

    As the Air Force looks to retire Lockheed's U-2 Dragon Lady in 2019, the company has come up with a next-generation replacement, Scott Winstead, strategic business manager for the U-2 program, told reporters on Monday at the Air Force Association's annual conference. Lockheed is still shaping the capabilities of TR-X, a high-altitude aircraft that is designed to conduct intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions for decades to come.

    TR-X will look very much like the U-2, taking advantage of the spy plane's General Electric F118 engine and with a similar modular payload capability. The concept is for a low-observable aircraft designed to fly at 70,000 feet, Winstead said.



    Lockheed is looking into increased power and cooling to accommodate new sensors, electronic warfare suites, and a more advanced communications system with the ability to communicate with both fourth and fifth-generation fighter jets, Winstead said. The plane will comply with the Air Force's Open Mission Systems standards to keep up with technology advances, and may even employ offensive and defensive laser weapons in future.

    While Lockheed pitched the TR-X to reporters here on Monday, the team has yet to brief the Air Force on the new concept, Lt. Gen. Robert Otto, deputy chief of staff for ISR, told reporters later that day.

    For now, the Air Force is not committing to TR-X or any other next-generation U-2 concept, Otto said. The service just doesn't have the resources right now to maintain two high-altitude ISR platforms — the U-2 and Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk — as well as develop a new concept.

    "Both U-2 and Global Hawk have legs well into the late 20s, I think you are into the 30s, maybe into the 40s in terms of how long those platforms could last before they are deemed not airworthy," Otto said, noting that the Air Force is upgrading the Global Hawk with new capabilities. "The issue for me is we don't have the money to afford two high-altitude ISR platforms."

    A next-generation high-altitude ISR platform would need to be stealthy to penetrate contested air space, and stealth historically drives huge cost increases, Otto emphasized.

    Otto likened the U-2 debate to the Air Force's controversial attempt to retire the A-10 close-attack aircraft.

    "That was the same thought behind the A-10 — not that we don't love the A-10, we do, we just can't afford it," Otto said. "So similarly I think with the Global Hawk and the U-2 is, you know, we love the U-2, we can't afford both platforms."
     
    Gessler likes this.
  9. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,790
    Likes Received:
    3,012
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  10. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,745
    Likes Received:
    9,636
    Country Flag:
    India
    USS Gerald R. Ford (pics via shipspotting.com)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  11. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,790
    Likes Received:
    3,012
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  12. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,790
    Likes Received:
    3,012
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  13. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    8,318
    Likes Received:
    6,264
    Country Flag:
    France
    The Navy apologizes after drawing a giant penis in the American sky

    A US Navy pilot used contrails from his plane to draw a penis over a small town in the western United States.

    The World | 18.11.2017 at 01:58 • Updated 18.11.2017 at 02:19


    [​IMG]
    The US Navy did not appreciate at all. The Navy even called Friday Friday, November 17 "unacceptable" the giant penis drawn in the sky by one of his pilots through the contrails of his aircraft during a training.
    "The Navy expects its crews the highest standards," annoyed the US Navy in a statement. The document adds that the "Navy apologizes to all those who have been offended by this irresponsible and immature act."

    On Thursday, the 2,500 residents of the small town of Okanogan in the northwestern United States found that a F / A-18 Growler from the nearby air base at Whidbey Island was beginning to draw an unusual trajectory.

    A shocked mother
    A mother complained to local television station KREM 2, who in turn sought the reaction of the military authorities. The initiative, however, amused another resident, Ramon Duran, who spoke to The Spokesman-Review , a local newspaper. "When he made the first circles down, I knew what it was and I started to laugh, " he said.

    The crew has since been grounded and will " be held accountable," warned the Navy, noting that a maneuver of this kind had "no training value" .

    https://translate.google.fr/transla...nt-dans-le-ciel_5216749_3222.html&prev=search
     
    BMD likes this.
  14. MUC-Spotter

    MUC-Spotter 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2017
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    145
    Country Flag:
    Germany
    Boeing C-17A Globemaster III USAF arrival at Munich Airport

     
  15. MUC-Spotter

    MUC-Spotter 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2017
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    145
    Country Flag:
    Germany
    Boeing C-17A Globemaster III USAF arrival at Munich Airport

     

Share This Page