Urban Mass Transport Systems in India

Discussion in 'Economy & Infrastructure' started by MAFIAN GOD, Apr 30, 2013.

  1. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Rapid Metro, Gurgaon

    Mott MacDonald to design Gurgaon Metro Phase II in India

    Mott MacDonald to design Gurgaon Metro Phase II in India

    Mott MacDonald will provide design for six new metro stations as part of the Phase II of the rapid metro rail network in Gurgaon, India, which is designed to meet the growing transportation requirements between Gurgaon and Delhi.

    Construction of Phase I comprised a 5.1km rail loop connecting Cyber City, NH-8 and Sikanderpur station on Delhi Metro Line 2, which began in 2008.

    Estimated to cost INR1500 million, the second phase will see a 6.5km rail line which will extend the network southwards and include six elevated metro stations – DLF Phase I, Sushant Lok, Sec. 42 Crossing, Sector 54-53, AIT Chowk and Sector 55-56. The stations will be built above existing carriageways and will include residential and commercial spaces.

    Upon completion, the project will offer a sustainable solution to the city’s traffic congestion by reducing dependency on cars, inefficient urban sprawl and increasing the use of public transport.

    To achieve LEED sustainability certification, the project will include various sustainable features like renewable energy sources such as solar power, energy-efficient design and rain water harvesting.

    The metro is being developed by Rapid Metro Rail Gurgaon. Phase II is expected to be completed by late 2016.
     
  2. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Bangalore Metro

    45 buildings to go, to make way for Metro

    45 buildings to go, to make way for Metro:crazy_pilot::shocked:

    [​IMG]

    Forty-five buildings on Mysore Road will make way for the second phase of the Namma Metro project. The Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Limited (BMRCL), which is now gearing up for this phase, has called for a tender to undertake a building condition study, and feasibility of partial or complete demolition of buildings identified on the road.

    As per the second phase plan, BMRCL has proposed to extend the existing east-west line from Nayandahalli to Kengeri. The line continues to be on the median of Mysore Road till it reaches Kengeri station. The five stations which will come up are Nayandahalli, Rajarajeshwari Nagar, Bangalore University Cross, RV College of Engineering and Kengeri.

    BMRCL has prescribed guidelines in the tender documents which include study of building structure and its conditions, structural features of adjacent buildings which are going to be affected due to demolition, and supervising the demolition works.

    The state government had entrusted the Karnataka Industrial Areas Development (KIADB) to acquire land for BMRCL to implement Phase II. As per estimates, BMRCL will spend Rs 1,977 crore for the land acquisition. The new phase has a total length of 72 km and will have four extensions of existing project — Mysore Road Terminal to Kengeri (6.46 km), Byappanahalli to Whitefield (15 km), Hesaraghatta cross to BIEC (3.77km), Puttenahalli Cross to Anjanapura Township (up to NICE road) and two new lines IIMB to Nagawara (21 km including 13.79 km underground stretch) and RV Road to Bommasandra (18.82 km).

    Last year, the government had directed KIADB to lower the service and administrative charges to 4 % from 7.5% of the basic land cost. The decision was taken by the state government after BMRCL contended that a hefty service charge to acquire the land would be a financial burden. KIADB, the nodal agency which acquires land, charges 7.5% as service charge for public sector companies and 11 % for private companies.
     
  3. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Delhi Metro

    CISF officer returns lost bag with Rs 3.8 lakh at Delhi Metro station

    CISF officer returns lost bag with Rs 3.8 lakh at Delhi Metro station:tup::police::mod:

    A CISF officer returned a bag containing Rs 3.8 lakh cash to its owner who lost it at a Delhi Metro station.

    The incident occurred last evening at Shastri Park Metro Station here when CISF Sub-Inspector Ajay Kumar found an unattended bag containing the cash and a bank passbook near the baggage x-ray machine.

    After sometime, according to a CISF official, one Vikash Kumar Jain, a resident of Rohini, came to claim the bag saying he had forgotten to collect it after scanning.

    "The bag was handed over to Jain after it was ascertained that he was its rightful owner," a senior official said.

    Kumar's name will be recommended for a citation by the CISF headquarters in view of his good job, the official added.
     
  4. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Amzing Article on Delhi Metro

    Did the Metro help reduce air pollution in Delhi?

    Did the Metro help reduce air pollution in Delhi?

    [​IMG]
    By March 2012, the Delhi Metro had an operational route length of 167 km.

    The Delhi Metro, an intra-city electric rail system serving the National Capital Region (NCR), has been operational since December 2002. By March 2012, the Delhi Metro had an operational route length of 167 km.

    While a key motivation behind building a mass transit system in Delhi was to ease traffic congestion, it wouldn’t have been hard to imagine that it may have a considerable impact on air quality as well. An improvement in air quality would presumably occur mainly because of the ‘traffic diversion effect’. This refers to the possibility that commuters who were earlier using personal transport such as cars and two-wheelers would switch to the Delhi Metro leading to net reduction in the level of vehicular emissions.
    :tup:
    Investigating whether this actually happened becomes particularly important for Delhi because the city is infamous for its high levels of air pollution. On most days between 2004 and 2006, the average levels of nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide exceeded the permissible standards set by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). Such high levels of pollution raise health concerns for the city’s inhabitants. The adverse effects of air pollution on health such as damage to the central nervous system, worsening of asthma and an increase in infant mortality rates, are well documented. Studies conducted by the CPCB find that high pollution levels in Delhi are positively associated with lung function deficits and with respiratory ailments. S.K Guttikunda and J.S. Apte in their book titled (Monitoring & Mapping Urban Air Pollution: A One Day Experiment in Delhi, India) found that about 10,900 premature deaths every year in Delhi occur due to ambient particulate matter pollution. In light of these facts, it is important to examine whether there has been any significant impact on air pollution in Delhi due to the operation of the metro.

    Traffic diversion versus traffic creation

    Based on transport economics theories, it is not possible to predict whether the net effect of the Delhi Metro on air quality will be positive or negative. The main argument is that along with the traffic diversion effect, there could be a traffic creation effect due to introduction of a new mode of transportation. The latter refers to new demand for travel generated by a faster and arguably more comfortable mode of transport such as the Delhi Metro. For example, new demand for travel could arise if, facilitated by the Delhi Metro, people decide to relocate to the outskirts of the city to possibly benefit from cheaper real estate prices, and then commute longer distances to work. If part of the increased distance is covered using pollution-intensive modes of transport (such as private cars), then this could negate any traffic diversion effect and could lead to an increase in overall level of pollution.

    An added dimension that needs to be considered while studying the net effect is the presence of two coal-based power plants within the city limits that were operational during our study period (2004-2006). If operation of the Delhi Metro resulted in increased capacity utilisation of these plants in order to supply electricity for running it, then this could also contribute to higher overall emissions in the city.

    Analysing the link between the metro and air quality

    In our study, we examine the effect of the Delhi Metro on air quality using data obtained from the CPCB on four pollutants—nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone and sulfur dioxide, between 2004 and 2006. This data is collected at two locations in Delhi—ITO, a major traffic intersection in central Delhi, and Siri Fort, a residential locality in South Delhi. We obtained hourly data on temperature, rainfall, wind speed and relative humidity for Delhi from the India Meteorological Department.

    In order to establish a causal link between the Delhi Metro and air quality it is important to compare pollution actually observed in the period after the Delhi Metro became operational with its correct “counterfactual”. This counterfactual refers to the level of pollution in the hypothetical scenario where all other factors that affect pollution remain the same as in the post-metro period, and the only difference is that the metro does not exist in the counterfactual. Any difference between the observed pollution in the post-metro period and the pollution in the counterfactual can then be attributed to the Delhi Metro. To do this, we estimate the trend (pattern over time) in pollution using hourly pollution data over a reasonably long time period which includes the date of extension of the Delhi Metro. If we detect a sudden change in the level of pollution at the date of extension of the Delhi Metro, then we attribute this change to the extension of the Delhi Metro.

    Between 2004 and 2006, there were six extensions of the Delhi Metro rail network. At each extension, we examine the time trend for each pollutant separately. We identify the localised, short-term effect on pollution that can be attributed to each extension of the Delhi Metro by conducting this analysis separately for pollution data from the ITO (Income Tax Office) and Siri Fort. Our preliminary analysis shows a reduction in the levels of nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide at both locations. This reduction varies between 24-29% for nitrogen dioxide and between 26-69% for carbon monoxide. For sulphur dioxide, we find an increase of 90% at ITO, and a decrease ranging between 35-89% for Siri Fort. For ozone, we do not find a uni-directional effect even across extensions at a particular location .

    Conclusions and caveats

    To summarize, preliminary evidence points towards a reduction in the levels of nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide. Given that both nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide are important vehicular emissions, our initial findings suggest that the Delhi Metro has encouraged people to switch from private to public mode of travel resulting in positive effects on air quality in the city.:yahoo::yahoo: In the light of our findings and given the existing evidence on the adverse health effects of air pollution, these indirect health benefits should be taken into account when urban policy makers contemplate setting up large scale intra-city transportation systems. We provide a rationale for subsidising these mass transit systems, such as the metro or dedicated bus routes, even when the direct costs do not show a net profit. These public transport systems should be considered seriously for other cities that face similar challenges in terms of vehicular congestion and health costs due to pollution.

    Two caveats should be kept in mind while interpreting and understanding these results. First, the large number of missing observations in the pollution data makes this analysis particularly challenging.:whistle: Further examination is needed to ensure that our results are not being driven by the pattern of missing observations. Second, for a few extensions, the magnitude of change in carbon monoxide and sulphur dioxide are very large to be driven solely by a traffic diversion effect. Also, ozone is created in the presence of sunlight and nitrogen dioxide through a complicated non-linear process. The results for ozone do not show a consistent pattern in our analysis. :thank_you2:
     
  5. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Kochi Metro

    Alternative routes planned to divert traffic during Kochi metro rail work

    Alternative routes planned to divert traffic during Kochi metro rail work

    Narrow, bottlenecked junctions in city to be widened to ensure smooth traffic

    Alternative roads, through which vehicles are to be diverted when work on the Kochi Metro begins on June 7, will be developed and resurfaced by the Kochi Metro Rail Limited (KMRL).

    This was decided at a meeting of KMRL representatives, traffic police and other stakeholders held here on Thursday. KMRL Managing Director Elias George said a tentative plan had been readied for traffic diversion. “The Aluva-Pettah alignment of the metro will be divided into numerous sub stretches and steps taken to streamline traffic flow. Suggestions from members of the public will be considered. Our aim will be to ensure minimum inconvenience to the public,” he said.

    “We will help the police procure recovery vans to tow away vehicles that obstruct traffic and also equipment for enabling traffic diversion. Steps will also be taken to install sign boards in various parts of the district to guide motorists,” he added. Mr. George said 20 of the 40 hectares of land required for the project had been acquired. The rest would be acquired by June-end.

    He said narrow and bottlenecked junctions in the city would be widened to pave way for smoother traffic.

    A traffic police officer said a final traffic diversion plan would be readied before June 7. “Steps will also be taken to widen the extremely narrow junction where Rajaji Road meets Chitoor Road, since more vehicles will use the newly-opened A.L. Jacob overbridge when vehicles are diverted as part of metro’s works.”

    DELHI METRO RAIL CORPORATION’S (DMRC) PRINCIPAL ADVISOR E. SREEDHARAN INSPECTED THE METRO’S ALIGNMENT FROM THE CITY UP TO EDAPPALLY ON THURSDAY. HE HELD DISCUSSIONS WITH SENIOR OFFICIALS, INCLUDING THOSE FROM BSNL, ON SPEEDY RELOCATION OF CABLES AND PIPELINES.

    SOURCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROJECT SAID IDENTIFICATION AND RELOCATION OF CABLES AND PIPELINES IN THE JAWAHARLAL NEHRU INTERNATIONAL STADIUM-ERNAKULAM SOUTH STRETCH WOULD BE A DIFFICULT TASK SINCE MOST DEPARTMENTS DID NOT HAVE DRAWINGS THAT IDENTIFIED THE EXACT LOCATIONS.

    PRIORITY WOULD BE GIVEN TO SHIFTING TELEPHONE CABLES AND OVERHEAD LINES, SINCE THE COMMUNICATION NETWORK HAD TO BE INTACT. THE RELOCATION WOULD BE DONE SIMULTANEOUSLY WITH THE CONSTRUCTION WORKS THAT WILL BE UNDERTAKEN IN DIFFERENT PHASES.


    L&T TEAM

    In a related development, a team of senior officials from Larsen & Toubro (L&T) arrived in the city to prepare the ground for beginning the construction work.

    They have begun recruiting personnel for test piling and subsequent works. Steps are also afoot to arrange machinery for the works.

    L&T was awarded the work to build the viaduct and stations in the Aluva-International Stadium stretch. The DMRC is expected to award the work on the rest of the metro corridor within a week.

    METRO YARDS

    The KMRL is expected to decide on construction yards, where girders and other material will be cast, within a week.

    “Land of the HMT is expected any time, while a few acres of FACT and SAIL lands will also be used for the purpose,” Mr. George said.

    The KMRL has identified a firm for carrying out safety audit of the metro works.
     
  6. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Mumbai Monorail

    Meet monorail's first 3 Indian captains:tup:

    Meet monorail's first 3 Indian captains

    [​IMG]

    Three young Mumbaikars are set to drive the city’s newest mode of transport — India’s first monorail that will start operating between Wadala and Chembur in August this year.

    A total of 21 captains have been appointed and are undergoing training, while 15 more will be recruited in the coming weeks. Like a local train has a motorman, captain is the title for those who will drive the monorail.

    It was a happy moment for the three — Mukesh Gupta, Rajesh Adhav and Ashish Phatak — when they received a call from monorail manufacturer Scomi with an offer to join as the first three Indian captains of India’s first monorail.

    Gupta, 28, a resident of Bhandup and a BCom graduate as well as an MBA with a diploma in electronic telecommunication, previously worked with a leading DTH service provider.

    He, however, grabbed the opportunity when he was offered to become a part of the Mumbai Monorail as a trainer-cum-captain.

    “What can be better than becoming the first captain of India’s first monorail?” he said.

    Paul Raju, a Malaysian trainer and the seniormost captain who is in charge of passing the know-how to the new recruits, said, “There is a lot of energy and excitement among them. Not one of them is laid-back. In fact, they all wait for their turn to steer the rail.”

    Narrating some of the experiences during training, Adhav, 25, said that whenever they witness bumper-to-bumper traffic on the roads below during peak hours they talk among themselves asking the stuck motorists and passengers to climb onboard the monorail.

    Phatak, 25, too is enjoying being in the limelight. “During the trial run, we have to stop at several places. On seeing the monorail, people immediately get out of their cars to click photos. Not to mention, people standing in their balconies immediately call their children to show the swanky train,” gushed Phatak.

    Both Adhav and Phatak have a diploma in electrical and were earlier associated with Siemens for the new-age rakes that are running on Mumbai’s suburban line.

    In a nutshell, the three monorail captains are enjoying a super celebrity status from their friends, families and even strangers.
     
  7. Anees
    Offline

    Anees Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

    Messages:
    5,692
    Likes Received:
    3,253
    Country Flag:
    United States
    India’s Metro Boom

    India’s Metro Boom

    [​IMG]

    One side effect of India’s rapid development over the past decade is the exponential growth of traditional urban centers like Mumbai or Delhi and the transformation of towns into cities.

    A look at India’s latest census figures shows that in the past 10 years, the urban population has grown by more than 31 percent, with cities and towns adding more than 91 million people. The pace of urbanization, coupled with surging automobile sales to middle class city dwellers, has resulted in congested metropolitan centers. State and city agencies eager to clear traffic have started an unprecedented number of urban rail lines.

    Bangalore, India’s technology hub, is a good example. Over the past decade, the city added 3 million residents, and two years ago, it launched an above-ground rail system. Currently, the system has 6.7 kilometers of track and could cover as many as 114 kilometers when finished.

    Delhi’s transit system came online in 2002. Since then, operating company Delhi Metro Rail has significantly expanded its 193-kilometer urban rail network, including opening a six-stop “Airport Express†in 2011 that links New Delhi to its international airport.

    Across India, as many as eight cities are either actively building subway lines or considering doing so, says Credit Suisse analyst Amish Shah. After road construction and power generation, the development of urban rail systems represents one of the country’s largest infrastructure investments, worth as much as $17 billion over five years if all projects make it past the drawing board.

    Construction on many of India’s new urban rail networks began when the country’s GDP was growing at a double-digit clip. But in recent years, the country’s economy has slowed significantly, hampered by rising inflation and a record trade imbalance. Despite these challenges, Shah expects urban rail networks to continue expanding. In fact, he believes that while investment in roads and power plant construction may decline, rail investment should remain strong.

    India’s Urban Rail Networks
    City Network Length Status
    Kolkata 25-Kilometer Operating (1984)
    Delhi 193-Kilometer Operating (2002)
    Bangalore 7.5-Kilometer /Planned size: 114-Kilometer Operating (2011)
    Mumbai Planned Size: 147-Kilometer Under Construction; (Anticipated Launch: 2013)
    Ahmedabad Planned Size: 76-Kilometer Advance Development
    Hyderabad Planned Size: 71-Kilometer Under Construction; (Anticipated Launch: 2017)
    Jaipur Planned Size: 32-Kilometer Under Construction; (Anticipated Launch: 2013)
    Kochi Planned Size: 25-Kilometer In Development
    Lucknow Planned Size: 40-Kilometer In Development
    Pune Planned Size: 32-Kilometer In Development
    Sources: Metrobits.org; IndianExpress.com; HMR; Jaipur Metro

    “The largest share of the infrastructure pie is driven by road and power projects, but both of these segments are expected to see decline,†he explains. “Investments supporting the construction of railway networks, including metros, monorails, or even arterial railways, should continue to grow.â€

    Mumbai, India’s commercial capital, provides an example of rail’s resiliency. A public-private partnership among Reliance Infrastructure as well as France’s Veolia Transport and a regional transportation agency, the Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority, is building a three-line rapid transit system. The inaugural line of the subway, initially set to go live in 2009, is now slated to open later this year.

    Other metro systems currently under development include the Metrolink Express in Ahmedabad, the economic capital of Gujarat. By 2021, predictive models indicate that the Metrolink Express could transport up to 2 million passengers a day on its 76-kilometer network. Hyderabad, a city in southern India, is developing a 71-kilometer system that, like the Mumbai network, is being spearheaded by a public-private partnership that includes Indian industrial conglomerate Larsen & Toubro. Passenger service along part of the network is expected to begin later next year.

    Jaipur, Kochi, Lucknow and Pune are also either constructing or drafting projects to build out transit systems in those cities. The rapid pace of activity could cause construction delays if the few companies able to participate in the public-private partnerships driving the subway boom become overstretched.

    Still, while the construction of India’s urban rail lines may go through hiccups in the coming years, it seems unlikely that anything could completely derail their development. The country’s growing urban population is on the move, and it will take continued development of urban rail projects to keep it that way.

    Photo courtesy of Paul Prescott — iStock Photos

    India?s Metro Boom | The Financialist
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Re: India’s Metro Boom

    [MENTION=8261]Anees[/MENTION] :-

    Nice find buddy.
    I have already opened a sticky for these kinds of development. You can add into it or MODS can merge them. Thanks in advance.

    Urban Mass Transport Systems in India
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    NICE VIDEO :tup:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  10. Anees
    Offline

    Anees Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

    Messages:
    5,692
    Likes Received:
    3,253
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Re: India’s Metro Boom

    Sorry and Thanks ... Dear Mod Please merge it ....
     
  11. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Delhi BRTS

    BRTS: Lessons Delhi can learn from Ahmedabad's transport system

    BRTS: Lessons Delhi can learn from Ahmedabad's transport system

    [​IMG]

    Both Delhi and Ahmedabad, which are separated by nearly 800 kilometres of road, boast a Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS). But the Ahmedabad BRTS reminds one of the Delhi Metro rather than its Delhi counterpart. Buses in the Gujarat city run (mostly) on time and use an automated passenger information system.

    The Delhi BRTS, as chief minister Sheila Dikshit admitted to The Times of India earlier this week, is a spectacular flop, hobbled by poor planning, lack of foresight and sloppy lane regulations ("even government cars enter the wrong lanes").

    The Ahmedabad BRTS couldn't be more different. Since its launch 44 months ago, the BRTS has turned out to be the most popular means of transport for the people of Ahmedabad. Its origins are similar to its Delhi counterpart's in that it was devised as an answer to the city's traffic troubles after the population swelled to 60 lakh.

    Hop in, Hop Out

    Deputy municipal commissioner of Ahmedabad Utpal Padia says the project succeeded thanks to leadership. He says a strong leadership is crucial to a project's success in a democratic setup like India. The Ahmedabad BRTS had such a leader in IP Gautam, who recently retired as the longest serving municipal commissioner of Ahmedabad, according to him.

    Under Gautam's aegis, the Ahmedabad Municipality swiftly created a special purpose vehicle - Ahmedabad Janmarg Ltd (AJL) — to thrust the responsibility, execution and adherence to policy upon a new company. Before the launch, authorities took into confidence the people whose participation was vital to its success — commuters. They were given free rides initially.

    The people were fed up with the BRTS' predecessor, the Ahmedabad Municipal Transport Services (AMTS), whose buses were notorious for their erratic service and deteriorated quality. The BRTS is the polar opposite of the AMTS. It boasts smart cards, designer bus stops that cost Rs 1 crore each, airconditioned buses, dedicated fast lanes, a public information system, Global Positioning System and a centralised control room. "The BRTS brought in respect and glamour to the city's public transport system," says Kumar Manish, head, communications & outreach, Centre for Green Mobility.

    To date, the Ahmedabad BRTS has completed 66 km. Another 22 km is due for completion, taking the total cost to Rs 1,000 crore. Experts say an overland or elevated section of the Delhi Metro cost on an average Rs 100 crore per km. Underground costs were higher at Rs 475 crore per km. Taking the least average construction cost of Rs 100 crore per km, if a metro train system had replaced the BRTS in Ahmedabad, the city would have spent Rs 8,800 crore (Rs 100 crore X 88 km) for the 88-km system.

    That makes the BRTS more economical than a metro for most cash-strapped Indian municipalities. Nalin Sinha, director, Initiative for Transportation & Development Programmes (ITD), New Delhi, says the BRTS can be built in most cities in less than two years at a fraction of the Metro's cost.

    Shining Example

    The Ahmedabad BRTS' success has caught the attention of other Indian cities. Metros such as Chennai, Kolkata and Bengaluru and tier-1 cities such as Hyderabad, Pune and Indore, and smaller towns such as Pimpri, Chinchwad and Hubli are either implementing or are looking to launch a similar transport system.
     
  12. layman
    Offline

    layman Colonel THINK TANK

    Messages:
    10,082
    Likes Received:
    2,095
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Great post. Automated transport systems is the way forward....
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Re: India’s Metro Boom

    Jaipur Metro :cheers::tribaldance::yahoo::BVICTORY:

    Cheer for Jaipurwallahs as metro coaches to reach city today

    Cheer for Jaipurwallahs as metro coaches to reach city today

    [​IMG]

    Jaipur: The Jaipur Metro coaches are expected to reach the city by Sunday afternoon or evening. Four heavy trailers which are carrying the coaches are known to have entered the Rajasthan border via Ratanpur from Gujarat on Friday night. :BVICTORY:In wee hours of Saturday, the trailers reached Udaipur, from where they were heading towards Chittorgarh, according to reports.

    Sources said that coaches were halted in Chittorgarh due to the statewide bandh call given by the BJP. The Jaipur Metro Rail Corporation (JMRC) officials directed the Bharat Earth Movers Limited (BEML) staffers to halt and depart for Jaipur only after 4 in the evening after the bandh was over.

    A JMRC official said, “The coaches left for Jaipur from Chittorgarh in the evening. They will pass through Bhilwara, Beawar, Ajmer and Kishangarh. The coaches will probably reach Jaipur by Sunday afternoon or evening. The coaches will be parked at Mansarovar depot.”

    He also said that a stay has been given to the trailers at Kishangarh Bypass. However, the officials of DMRC, which gave the contract of manufacturing the coaches to BEML, said that the coaches would reach Jaipur by Sunday morning. Sources said that the DMRC and JMRC gave different timing of coaches’ arrival to keep crowds at bay when the coaches reach the Mansarovar depot.

    Readers may note that the BEML was contracted to supply 40 coaches to run 10 trains (each of four coaches) on the Mansarovar-Chandpol metro line. The first instalment of the coaches left Bangalore for Jaipur on April 29.
     
  14. S K Mittal
    Offline

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    305
    Looks like most big cities of India will get their own metro.
    congrats to Indians.
     
  15. MAFIAN GOD
    Offline

    MAFIAN GOD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    465
    Jaipur Metro

    Jaipur Metro likely to roll out in August
    Jaipur Metro likely to roll out in August

    [​IMG]

    JAIPUR: The people of Jaipur may be able to take Metro rides in their city as early as August this year, as the first lot of four coaches arrived here from Bangalore today.

    "After system testing and trial, the train from Mansarovar to Chandpole section under the first phase will be introduced for public in August," Jaipur Metro Rail Corporation MD Nihal Chand Goel said today.

    He said that the process of necessary checks and trial runs will take around one-and-a-half month, after which the train of four coaches will be ready for public.

    Ten train sets of four coaches each are to be commissioned and hopefully all the trains will arrive here from Bangalore by October, he said.

    The coaches, manufactured at Bharat Earth Movers Ltd's factory in Bangalore, were transported by road on special trailers on April 29.

    After the Mansarovar-Chandpole section, the Chandpole -Badi Chaupar is the next section in the corridor and will be taken up at the second stage.

    The total length of the East-West corridor (from Mansarovar to Badi Chaupar) is 12.06 km and the length of the Mansarovar-Chandpole section is 9.5 km.
     

Share This Page