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Was PM Shastri Assassinated?

Discussion in 'General History' started by Lion of Rajputana, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    I've been watching TV programs/documentaries about the 1965 War and Shastri's death online, and afterwards scoured the internet for any reading material I could find on the topic. I'm copy-pasting some of the articles I read here.

    @Hellfire , @PARIKRAMA , @Gessler , @Agent_47 , @vstol jockey , @Wolfpack , @Grevion , @Blackjay , @Nilgiri , @Kalmuahlaunda, @SrNair , @nair . What do you guys think?

    @lca-fan , Bro, I tagged as many people as I could remember off the top of my head, but I know you usually tag a tonne of people from the forumn when you make threads, so kindly share your thoughts on the topic and also tag everyone you know. I'd like to know what everyone thinks about this.

    Also, sorry to the mods if this thread is in the wrong place, but I honestly wasn't sure where to put it.
     
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  2. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Is Lal Bahadur Shastri’s Death In Tashkent a Murder Mystery?

    Kirti Phadtare Pandey
    Updated: 11 January, 2017 8:24 AM IST

    11 January 1966

    The day India lost its beloved Prime Minister who had stood strong for the nation in the face of aggression, and allowed the Army a free hand to hit back hard at Pakistan's misadventures in Kashmir.

    Was Lal Bahadur Shastri murdered? Officially, Shastri died of a heart attack in a dacha in Tashkent, hours after he signed a peace agreement with the Pakistani president Ayub Khan.

    The Pakistani president and the Indian prime minister were in Tashkent to sign a peace accord – only four months after the end of the second war between the two neighbours.

    Surviving members of the Shastri family and veteran journalist Kuldip Nayyar shocked the world in 2009 by openly claiming that Shastri was possibly poisoned.



    The 1965 War & the Tashkent Accord
    [​IMG]
    Shastri was not a diminutive figure when it came to politics. He fearlessly refused to withdraw from sections that the Indian Army had made inroads during the 1965 war that Pakistan had heaped upon India. (Photo Courtesy: Twitter)
    Asal Uttar’ means befitting reply and Indian Army, tasked to defend that sleepy town in Punjab during the 1965 war, was eager to give Pakistan such a reply knowing little that they would take on the mighty Patton tanks in a battle that would be remembered in military history.
    Asal Uttar was a battle where foot soldiers took on the Pattons that – America had so famously bragged – could not be destroyed by anything in the world.

    It was in this battle that CQMH Abdul Hamid brought laurels to his unit, destroying seven Pattons.

    Also in the battle was a now famous participant – a young Pakistani Lieutenant of artillery in the 16 (SP) Field Regiment, 1st Armoured Division Artillery – Pervez Musharraf – who went on to become the Army Chief of Staff and later the President of Pakistan.

    Over 22 days when India went forth to teach Pakistan a lesson for its nefarious incursions and activities in Kashmir, five major battles were fought by the Indian Army. The battles fought at Haji Pir, Asal Uttar, Barki, Dogri and Phillora are iconic for the bravery quotient and also the freehand that the then PM Lal Bahadur Shastri and Defence Minister Yashwantrao B Chavan gave the army chief.
    [​IMG]
    Then defence minister YB Chavan visits the war front. (Photo Courtesy: Twitter)
    [​IMG]
    The then PM Lal Bahadur Shastri made sure he reached out to the men of the fronts. (Photo Courtesy: Twitter)
    The Tashkent Accord
    Pakistani President Ayub Khan made a lunge for the United Nations.

    After great efforts from the Russians and the Americans, Shastri relented and agreed to stop the war.

    Russian premier Alexei Kosygin played host and oversaw the signing of the peace accord between Ayub Khan and LB Shastri.

    There was a lot of unhappiness over the fact that hard-won territories had to be returned and the sacrifice of the Indian soldiers had been in vain. It is believed that India lost in Tashkent what it had gained during the war. The Indian Army suffered 11,479 casualties in the 1965 war (including ceasefire violations) with 2,862 killed and 8,617 wounded. According to Indian records 5800 Pakistanis were killed. Source: (Book) 1965, Stories from The Second Indo-Pak War
    Shastri was an unhappy man that night. He retired to his room and told his daughter Suman on phone that he planned to have a glass of milk and retire for the night.

    “Your Prime Minister is Dying!”
    In his book Beyond The Lines, journalist Kuldip Nayyar recounts how he was rudely woken up by a Russian lady who said to him: “Your Prime Minister is dying.”

    I saw Soviet premier Alexei Kosygin standing in the verandah. He raised his hand to say Shastri was no more. From Kuldip Nayyar’s book Beyond The Lines
    The PM’s body was flown to India.

    [​IMG]
    Shastri’s wife Lalita Shastri noted his body was blue with patches of white and that there were cut marks on his stomach. (Photo Courtesy: LIFE magazine cover)
    The bluish tinge and white patches on Shastri’s body were strange and had perturbed his family. There had been no post-mortem and yet there were cut marks on his abdomen, as though his stomach had been washed from the insides.

    As days passed by, the Shastri family became increasingly convinced that he had been poisoned. On 2 October 1970, (Shastri’s birthday) Lalita Shastri asked for a probe into her husband’s death.
    Shockingly, when a commission was established to carry out the enquiry, Shastri’s personal physician Dr RN Chugh and personal attendant Ram Nath, who were with him on the Tashkent trip, died in accidents on separate days, rather mysteriously. The mishaps occurred on days they were to depose before the commission.
    BJP leader Sidharth Nath Singh, who is Lal Bahadur Shastri's grandson, told BBC: “Knowing the truth is important for our family. The truth has never been out.”

    Singh is not the only one who wants to know.
     
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  3. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    4 reasons Lal Bahadur Shastri’s death was suspicious
    A needle of suspicion points towards an insider's hand.
    POLITICS

    [​IMG]
    ANUJ DHAR

    @anujdhar

    Also read: Why there's a Netaji angle to Lal Bahadur Shastri's death

    But around 1.25am on January 11, Shastri woke up, coughing severely. The room he was in had no phone or intercom. So he walked out to another room to tell his staff to inform his personal doctor RN Chugh. By the time Dr Chugh arrived, Shastri was dying. The symptoms were of a heart attack. There was not much Dr Chugh could do now. He began to cry. "Babuji, you did not give me enough time." Shastri took Lord Ram's name and he was gone.

    What happened next had a ring of unusualness about it. Given here for your consideration are four reasons that make Shastri’s death suspicious:

    1. The KGB suspected poisoning

    At 4am, Ahmed Sattarov, the Russian butler attached to Shastri, was rudely woken up by an officer of the Ninth Directorate of the KGB (responsible for the safety of VIPs). In Sattarov's own words, the KGB officer "said that they suspected the Indian prime minister had been poisoned".

    Also read: Why Lal Bahadur Shastri was one of India's greatest PMs

    Sattarov was handcuffed and, along with three junior butlers, was rounded off to a location 30km away. Their harsh interrogation commenced in a dungeon. After some time, Jan Mohammad was brought in. In Sattarov's words again: "We thought that it must have been that man who poisoned Shastri."

    Decades after the harrowing interrogation he was subjected to, Sattarov continued to reel under its impact. "We were so nervous that the hair on the temple of one of my colleagues turned gray before our eyes, and ever since I stutter".

    2. Shastri’s near and dear ones see a needle of suspicion pointing towards an insider's hand

    When Shastri’s body was brought to Delhi, no one had any clue about what the KGB was suspecting. But seeing strange blue patches on Shastri’s body, his mother screamed that someone had poisoned her son. “Mere bitwa ko jahar de diya!” The old woman’s wail continues to haunt the Shastri family till date.

    Shastri’s sons Anil and Sunil Shastri (one in Congress, another in BJP) and grandsons Sanjay and Siddharth Nath Singh have often spoken about their ongoing anguish and pain about what happened so long ago.

    Shastri’s wife Lalita died thinking that her husband had been poisoned. Other family members and near and dear ones, like childhood friend TN Singh and close follower Jagdish Kodesia, were not able to make sense of the cut marks on Shastri's stomach and back of the neck. The cut on his neck was pouring blood and the sheets, pillows and clothes used by him were all soaked in blood. A grandson of Shastri told me that he still has his nanaji’s blood-soaked cap.

    Also read: Remembering Lal Bahadur Shastri's role in 1965 war

    Back in 1966, the family sought clarification and action from the government. Whatever was done did not satisfy them. Kodesia, a former Delhi Congress chief, even began to think that Shastri’s death had some link to the Netaji mystery.

    Veteran journalist Kuldip Nayar, who was in Tashkent on that fateful day as Shastri’s advisor, opened up recently to state that his suspicions were aroused some time after the tragedy when a Member of Parliament raked up the charges of poisoning and TN Kaul, by then the foreign secretary, "rang me up to issue a statement" against it.

    "He badgered me literally four-five times."

    Jan Mohammed was employed in the Rashtrapati Bhavan after the Tashkent tragedy.

    Dr Chugh, his wife and two sons were run over by a truck in 1977. Only his daughter survived, but was crippled.

    3. No post mortem was carried out on Shastri’s body

    The only sure-shot way to find out whether or not Shastriji was poisoned was to carry out a post-mortem on his body. The family demanded it. But the demand was not accepted. Interim prime minister Gulzarilal Nanda was to later on feign ignorance about Shastri’s family approaching him with the demand.

    4. RTI responses muddied the water further

    In 2009, I tried to get some clarity on the issue by filing RTI applications. The prime minister's office (PMO) told me that it possessed only one classified document relating to the former prime minister’s death, and that there was no record of any destruction or loss of any document related to the tragedy.

    The ministry of external affairs (MEA) informed me on July 1, 2009 that the division concerned had no information on the subject. It was quite strange because the sudden death of the prime minister must have thrown the Indian embassy in Moscow and the ministry in New Delhi into a tizzy.

    Ambassador Kaul must have scrambled to inform Delhi of the tragedy. The ministry would have gone on an overdrive to find out the circumstances leading to the prime minister’s death. The ambassador must have been asked to send blow-by-blow reports, and he must have done that.

    The Russians too would have felt obliged to tell the Indians about their handling of the matter. And as the charges of foul play emerged, the government of India, through the ministry of external of affairs (and also the intellligence bureau, which was then responsible for foreign intelligence), must have tried to get to the bottom of the story. So how could the division in the ministry have no records?

    On July 21, I filed another application seeking copies of the entire correspondence between the MEA and the embassy and between the embassy and the Soviet foreign ministry over the issue. I requested the ministry to clearly state in case no such records were extant. In its belated response, the MEA refused to release the information, pleading that doing so would harm national interest.

    It was only after the intervention of chief information commissioner Satyananda Mishra that the MEA, in August 2011, supplied me copies of Dr Chugh’s medical report and a copy of the statement made by the external affairs minister in the Rajya Sabha. Neither of them was classified. There was no word about the secret documents.

    Mishra upheld the PMO’s decision in withholding the single secret record with it. Later, I learned that this record contained a conspiracy theory that the Americans had spread rumours about foul play in Shastri’s death. I see nothing to back this mindless charge.

    Anyhow, today there must be several classified records about Shastri’s death in the non-accessible archives of our intelligence agencies. The Russians will have interrogation records of the butlers at least. In the fullness of time all of that must come out. Perhaps time has come for Shastriji’s family to seek an appointment with the prime minister.
     
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  4. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Was Mr Shastri murdered?
    Soutik Biswas | 11:40 UK time, Thursday, 27 August 2009


    [​IMG]

    Was India's third prime minister, Lal Bahadur Shastri, murdered? Officially, the diminutive leader died of a heart attack in a dacha in Tashkent, hours after he signed a peace agreement with the Pakistani president, Ayub Khan, on 11 January 1966, some four months after the end of the second war between the two neighbours. But if you believe surviving members of Mr Shastri's family and an enthusiastic Delhi-based journalist, Mr Shastri was possibly poisoned.

    What has added grist to the conspiracy mill is the Indian government's refusal to declassify a documentit has in its possession pertaining to Mr Shastri's death. In response to a right to information request by the enterprising Anuj Dhar, a journalist and a self-proclaimed "declassification enthusiast", the prime minister's office said that making public that document could "harm foreign relations, cause disruption in the country and cause breach of parliamentary privileges". Totally non-controversial in his life, Mr Shastri has become controversial in death.

    I did a little digging around and found that most of the better-known accounts of Mr Shastri's death have raised no doubts - death by heart failure. In his magisterial India After Gandhi, historian Ramachandra Guha writes Mr Shastri "died in his sleep of a heart attack". In her biography of Indira Gandhi, Katherine Frank writes that after he "went to bed in the early hours of the 11th January, Mr Shastri had a fatal heart attack".

    The most vivid account is in my dog eared copy of the long out-of-print book India, The Critical Years by veteran Indian journalist Kuldip Nayar. He was part of the prime minister's travelling press corps to Tashkent.

    Mr Nayar writes that the Indian prime minister was already a heart patient, having suffered two attacks. He had had a hectic day, holding talks with the Russian premier, Alexey Kosygin - the Russians having brokered the pact - and his officials and had had very little sleep.

    "That evening," writes Mr Nayar, "I met by chance his personal physican Dr RN Chugh, who accompanied him. I asked him how Shastri was standing the strain. He looked up to the sky and said: 'Everything is in the hands of God'." Mr Nayar does not elaborate.

    Mr Nayar then proceeds to describe the fateful night in Agatha Christie-like detail. Since he was to travel in the prime minister's airplane early next morning to Kabul en route to Delhi, he retired to bed early an hour before midnight. "I must have been dozing when someone knocked at my door and said: 'Your prime minister is dying.' A Russian lady was waking up all the journalists," writes Mr Nayar.

    A group of journalists then sped to Mr Shastri's dacha from the hotel. On arriving, Mr Nayar found a grief-stricken Mr Kosygin standing on the verandah. "He could not speak and only lifted his hands to indicate Shastri was no more."

    When Mr Nayar went in, he found Dr Chugh being questioned by a group of Soviet doctors through an interpreter. In the next room Mr Shastri lay still on his bed. The journalists emptied the flower vases in the room and spread them on the prime minister's body. Mr Nayar also noticed an overturned thermos flask on a dressing table some 10 feet away from Mr Shastri's bed and wondered whether the prime minister had struggled to get to open it to get water. "His slippers were neatly placed near the bed; it meant that he walked barefoot up to the dressing table in the carpeted room," Mr Nayar writes.

    Mr Nayar then pieces together the events leading up to Mr Shastri's death - of how the prime minister reached the dacha around 10 pm after a reception, chatted with his personal staff and asked his cook Ram Nath to bring him food "which was prepared in the dacha by the Russians". It gets more interesting from here. "In the kitchen there was a Soviet cook helped by two ladies - both from the Russian intelligence department - and they tasted everything, including water, before it was served to Mr Shastri," Mr Nayar writes. Remember this was at the height of the Cold War and India-Pakistan hostilities and the security paranoia was extreme.

    As Mr Shastri tucked into a frugal spinach and potato curry meal, he received a call from a personal assistant in Delhi and sought the reaction to the Tashkent agreement back home. Then he spoke to his family in Delhi. He asked his eldest daughter, Kusum, about how she had found the peace pact. "She replied, 'we have not liked it'," writes Mr Nayar. "He asked 'what about her mother?' She too had not liked the declaration, was the reply given." A crestfallen Mr Shastri, according to Mr Nayar, then remarked: "If my own family has not liked it, what will the outsiders say?"[​IMG]

    Mr Nayar writes that the prime minister's wife did not come on the line to talk despite many requests - a contention that is disputed by many of his surviving family members. This upset Mr Shastri. "He began pacing up and down the room... For one who had had two heart attacks earlier, the telephone conversation and the walking must have been a strain," he writes. Then his staff gave him milk and some water in the flask. Around 1.30 am, his personal assistant Sahai, according to Mr Nayar, saw Mr Shastri at his door, asking with difficulty, "Where is the doctor?"

    The staff woke up Dr Chugh, while the prime minister's staff, assisted by Indian security men, helped Mr Shastri walk back to his room. "If it was a heart attack - myocardiac infarction, and obstruction of blood supply to the heart muscles, as the Soviet doctors said later - this walk," writes Mr Nayar, "must have been fatal."

    Mr Nayar writes - presumably from an eyewitness account by the personal assistant - that Mr Shastri began coughing "rockingly", touched his chest and became unconscious. Dr Chugh arrived soon after, felt the prime minister's pulse, gave an injection into the heart, tried mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, but to no avail. More doctors arrived. They found Mr Shastri dead. The time of the death was 1.32 am.

    Talk about foul play began as soon as the body arrived in Delhi. Mr Nayar says the prime minister's wife asked him why Mr Shastri's body had turned blue. He told her that when "bodies are embalmed" they turn blue. Mrs Shastri was not convinced. She asked about "certain cuts" on Mr Shastri's body. Mr Nayar told her he hadn't seen any. "Apparently, she and others in the family suspected foul play," Mr Nayar writes.

    They still do. I went to meet Sidharth Nath Singh, the prime minister's grandson and a senior member of the main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party, recently to hear the family side of the story. He told me that Mr Nayar's account of the telephone conversation that Mr Shastri had with his family members that night was inaccurate, and that he HAD spoken to his wife. Mr Singh, who was two years old when his grandfather died, says that one person was detained on "suspicion of poisoning Mr Shastri", but was released. Mr Nayar's book has no mention of this.

    "Knowing the truth is important for our family. The truth has never been out," Mr Singh told me. Then he talked about the cold war politics of the day, and who would have gained from poisoning Mr Shastri who had served as prime minister for only 19 months: a foreign power, political rivals. Some of it sounds remotely credible; other bits outlandish. But Mr Singh and the nation deserve to know why the government is holding the paper about Mr Shastri's death back. How will it imperil our foreign relations? With whom? India has a notoriously stodgy reputation as far as declassifying historical documents is concered; the state almost encourages a statist historiography. The truth should be out and the controversy should be buried, once for and all.
     
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  5. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Shastri death linked to Netaji?
    Prithvijit Mitra| TNN | Aug 13, 2015, 04.11 AM IST
    KOLKATA: Former Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri's sudden demise in Tashkent might have been linked to his views on Netaji's disappearance and his efforts to form a second probe commission to solve the mystery, claim an activist who demands declassification of Netaji files and a member of Shastri family.

    Minutes before his death in Tashkent in 1966, Shastri had reportedly informed his family over phone that he would divulge something that would shift the country's attention from the contentious Tashkent declaration that had just been signed.

    Shastri was also keen on setting up a second inquiry commission to probe the mysterious disappearance of Subhas Chandra Bose, which had not gone down well with an influential section of the ruling party, say the activists.

    The appearance of Gumnami Baba in the Sixties — who was rumoured to be Netaji — had brought the focus back on the patriot's disappearance and certain forces were trying to quash the probe, says activist and author Anuj Dhar.

    "Shastri was in favour of an unbiased inquiry. It might have revealed the truth, which would have been unacceptable to many. It is suspicious that he died soon after, without any illness and before he could reveal what he wanted to," he adds.

    In response to an RTI filed by Dhar, the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) had admitted in 2009 that it had one document relating to Shastri's death which could not be disclosed as it could harm foreign relations. It could cause disruption in the country and breach of parliamentary privileges, it was said.

    Dhar believes that the secret document suggests foul play in Shastri's death which clearly points at "a conspiracy to eliminate him due to his views on Netaji's disappearance". A copy of the same document could also be lying in Kolkata, he says. "The two West Bengal government intelligence files detailing snooping on Netaji family members are likely to contain an oral testimony that Shastri was not in the same league on Netaji's disappearance as his predecessor. When he was the union home minister, Shastri was the only cabinet member who showed an interest in Gumnami Baba. So, a link between his views on Netaji and his sudden death in Tashkent can't be ruled out," says Dhar, who has authored a book on Netaji's disappearance titled "India's Biggest Cover-Up".

    Shastri's grandson Sanjay Nath Singh says the Prime Minister had spoken to his family members over phone less than an hour before he was declared dead in Tashkent. Singh, who was nine years old then, was present in the room when he had called. "He wanted to know the reaction to the Tashkent agreement. When he was told that the opposition had made a ruckus over it, he said that he would soon disclose something that will make the country forget the controversy. About 45 minutes later, we got a call saying he was very ill. It was followed by another call in 10 minutes which said he was dead. Since he was in Russia where Netaji was also believed to have been, there is a reason to suspect a link. However, there is no evidence yet," says Singh.
    There were several discrepancies that hinted at a foul play in Shastri's death, says Singh. "Shastri was supposed to stay at a hotel in Tashkent. Strangely, he was made to stay in a villa instead. When his body was flown back to India, we found blood marks on his mouth, nostrils and chest. Had he died of a heart attack, which was the official cause of death, where would the blood come from? We will never be sure as no post-mortem was done," says Singh.


    Three weeks before his Tashkent visit, Shastri had unveiled the Netaji statue on Mayo Road in December 1965. Netaji's grandnephew Chandra Kumar Bose, who was present on the occasion, says that the Prime Minister had told his father Amiya Nath Bose that he would search evidence of Netaji's presence in Russia during his visit. "Shastri was serious about it. There is no doubt that he was poisoned. We should find out if it had anything to do with Netaji," says Bose.
     
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  6. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    New revelation about Lal Bahadur Shastri
    June 22, 2011 16:17 IST
    [​IMG]
    A foreign country, which now has good relations with India, spread false information on the death of former Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri in Tashkent nearly four decades ago, intelligence reports produced on Wednesday by the Prime Minister's Office MO before the Central Information Commission indicate.

    Being directed by Chief Information Commissioner Satyananda Mishra to produce before him all the "classified documents" related to death of Shastri in a sealed cover, the Prime Minister's Office produced only one sheet of paper saying it is the only document in classified category with it.

    After going through the document, Mishra pointed out that document has "nothing to do directly" with the death of the former Prime Minister.

    "The document comprises intelligence reports collected from different sources saying that a foreign country was spreading canards about former Prime Minister's death. The country mentioned here was not in good terms at that time but now we certainly have good relations. The document, if disclosed, has potential to adversely affect these relations," Mishra observed without naming the country.

    The case relates to RTI application filed by Anuj Dhar, author of "CIA's eye on South Asia", seeking "classified documents" held by the PMO on the death of Shastri in Tashkent in 1966. The CIC had directed the PMO to produce the documents before it to decide if they can be disclosed.

    Reacting to it, BJP leader and grandson of Shastri, Siddarth Nath Singh said there was a tendency in India once to blame Pakistan or the international community for all wrongs.

    "If it has been a rumour for last four decades, why should government shy away from de-classifying records," he asked.

    "The suspicion is not on basis of hearsay. Suspicion is because of susceptible circumstances leading towards the unnatural death of Shastriji," Singh said.

    During the hearing, Mishra also said it has been four decades since the death of Shastri and if the government had come with a white paper on the incident, these conspiracy theories could have been put to rest but reserved his decision on the issue.

    Singh said there were too many reasons to believe that that it was not a natural death like body getting blue, no post-mortem done, missing cook who had come from who is alleged to have slipped into Pakistan and last minute change in the designated hotel room for the Prime Minister.

    Dhar, who filed the petition, said the information that some foreign country was behind rumours could have originated from the then spy agency of Russia, KGB, to wash its hands off as India was in the grip of "CIA-phobia" that time.

    After the 1965 war with Pakistan, Shastri had gone to Tashkent, in the erstwhile USSR, to meet the then Pakistan President Mohammad Ayub Khan.

    On January 11, 1966, a day after signing Tashkent declaration, he died under mysterious circumstances. His family had alleged foul play and demanded a post-mortem to know the causes of his death but it was not conducted.
     
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  7. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Lal Bahadur Shastri's death was not natural, claims his family
    TNN | Sep 26, 2015, 04.57 PM IST

    NEW DELHI: Amid the ongoing controversy and mystery over Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose's death, former Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri's family has demanded that all files related to his death should be made public.

    In an interview to news channel CNN-IBN, Lal Bahadur Shastri's son and Congress leader Anil Shastri said that his father's death did not look natural.

    "When my father's body came to the Delhi airport, the Palam airport as it was called then, and when it was taken out of the aircraft, that came as a shock because his body had turned blue. His face had turned blue and there were white spots on the temple," Anil Shastri told the news channel.

    "The moment my mother saw the body, she straightaway came to the conclusion that it was not a natural death," Anil Shastri said. "My mother told the family that it was a foul play," Anil Shastri said. Anil Shastri urged the Prime Minister that documents related to Lal Bahadur Shastri's death should be declassified.

    Anil Shastri called it "unbelievable" that the Prime Minister's room in the capital of then Soviet Uzbekistan had "no call bell, no telephone, no caretaker in his room and no first aid. He had to walk up to the door himself." He alleged that the death was due to fault done by the Indian embassy and termed it as "height of negligence". "His death was badly handled by the Indian government. It hurts me to a great extent," he said.

    Opining that Shastri was not taken "seriously", he said: "Post-mortem could have been done in Tashkent if there was a request from the Indian government or a request from the Indian doctors."

    "... some close associates feel that suspicion revolves around an Indian hand or a foreign power," he said.

    Anil Shastri claimed that his father had come to know about a scam involving a shipping tycoon Dharam Teja. Citing an article by eminent journalist Khushwant Singh, Shastri claimed Teja was in Tashkent at the time of his father's death. He also claimed that the Prime Minister was likely to take action and order an inquiry against Teja after his return to India.

    Shastri and then Pakistani president, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, had been invited to Tashkent by then Soviet premier Alexei Kosygin for peace talks following the Indian-Pakistan War in 1965. An agreement was signed on January 10, 1966 but Shastri was found dead a few hours later, having suffered cardiac arrest.

    Raising suspicions over the hand of a foreign power in his death, Anil Shastri said: "...Lal Bahadur Shastri had suddenly gained a lot of power, when he retaliated with full force against Pakistan. Whether it was America, China or any third country... I cannot name any country but the truth is Lal Bahadur Shastri was becoming very strong in the region."He also raised the sudden death of Dr RN Chugh, the personal physician accompanying the Prime Minister. Chugh died in an accident with his family. Anil Shastri also added that his father's personal assistant too met with an accident, was crippled and lost his memory. He also expressed concern over his father's missing red personal diary. "He made daily notings in it and may have even written about the Tashkent agreement and the pressures he was under," he said.
     
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  8. Bloom 17

    Bloom 17 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    I believe in his death being a murder.
     
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  9. Grevion

    Grevion Think Tank TROLL ELITE MEMBER

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    He was killed by the opposition group in his own party.
    Maybe Gandhi family and Indira Gandhi were involved.

    People in my family believes he was killed by Indira so that she could become the Prime Minister.

    Maybe the Soviets had something to do with it. Indira later signed an Indo-Soviet friendship and cooperation treaty with USSR.
     
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  10. Angel Eyes

    Angel Eyes FULL MEMBER

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    Maybe CIA had him killed so that India couldn't develop nukes....
     
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  11. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Here Are 8 Conspiracies Surrounding The Death Of Lal Bahadur Shastri
    by Akarsh Mehrotra


    ceylon-ananda

    2. There was no post-mortem conducted. Or was there?
    His wife Lalitha said the body was blue and there were cut marks. A body turns blue if it is embalmed. If there was no post-mortem conducted, then why would these indications be there? And if it was, where are the reports?

    3. Could it be poisoning?

    His personal doctor, RN Chugh, had said that he was in perfect health and never had any heart issues in the past. A heart attack seemed highly unlikely. And since there were claims that there was no post-mortem conducted, then the puncture marks could be a result of poisoning.

    [​IMG]
    Source: knowquot

    4. What about the witnesses?
    There were two witnesses the night Shastri died and they were scheduled to be in front of the parliamentary body in 1977. One was Dr RN Chugh, who was on his way to testify in front of the committee but was hit by a truck and died.

    The other was his servant Ram Nath who visited Shastri's home first and according to the family members he said, “Bahut din ka bojh tha, amma. Aaj sab bata denge (I have been carrying this burden too long. I will shed it today).” He too was hit by a car. His legs were crushed and had to be amputated. He lost his memory.

    5. What of the CIA agent's word?
    Gregory Douglas, a journalist, interviewed CIA agent Robert Crowley, who confirmed that the death of Lal Bahadur Shastri and even Dr Homi Bhabha (father of Nuclear Science in India) was the work of the CIA. Shastri gave the green light for nuclear tests and the US seemed threatened by India emerging as a reformed state and also of Indo-Russian dominance in the region. The interview was published in a book called, "Conversations with the Crow" .

    [​IMG]
    Source: crooksandliars

    6. Was the Russian butler involved?
    The butler was serving the then PM and was in fact arrested. He had easy access to Shastri and if in fact he was poisoned, the butler would certainly be a big suspect. But he was allowed to walk and the authorities maintained that Shastri died of cardiac arrest.

    7. Why was Delhi Police asked to handle the retrieval of docs?
    The Home Ministry referred the matter to Delhi Police and the National Archives for retrieving any documents or information based on the incident. Shastri's son said that it was "absurd and silly" how the death of a sitting PM was inspected by district level police instead of higher authorities.

    8. What about the RTIs?
    Anuj Dhar (author of CIA's Eye on South Asia) filed an RTI pertaining to the PM's death. But the PMO responded saying there was only one classified document which could not be declassified as it may disrupt foreign relations.

    A different response was given to one, Kuldip Nayar, "No such record related to the death of the former Prime Minister of India Lal Bahadur Shastri is available in this district... Hence the requisite information pertaining to New Delhi district may please be treated as nil."

    [​IMG]
    Source: siliconeer

    He led the nation to victory in the 1965 war. His slogan, ' Jai Jawan Jai Kisan', became our war cry. Many twists in the mystery behind his death have taken place since the night of 11th Jan, 1966 in Tashkent.
    If the government was to declassify documents on his death, his family and the Indian public may get some substantial evidence or information on how our second premier died.

    https://www.scoopwhoop.com/inothernews/lal-bahadur-shastri-conspiracy/#.idd1z0soo

    There are GAMES which super powers play US & Russia were super powers then and so both may have hands in it. And could also involve anti national Nehru-Gandhi Family too.

    One more thing to be considered is Indian Army was battle hardened beingon the winning side of WW 1 & 2, Britishers along with USA didn't want India to be military power, hence they weakened India by installing their mole Nehru as PM of India who degraded IA which ed to India losing 1962 Indo-China war. And Shashtri REVIVING IA may not have gone down well with then Super Powers US, Russia, Britain and France, so could also be one of the reason.............

    @vstol jockey @Hellfire
     
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  12. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    After Nehru's death, Congress wanted to come out of the clutches of Nehru family. They had decided to send Indira to UK as India's HC and make Congress a pure democratic Party like BJP is today. This was not acceptable to Indira, she agreed only on one condition that Trimurti Bhavan has to be given to her in some manner or the other as she was very attached to it. So that was converted to Nehru memorial and Indira family was made life long trustee of it. But Indira did not stop at that. There were many congressmen who felt that their future will become bleak under a democratic congress. They started the conspiracy. Shastri was done in by KGB to create a void in India which they exploited thru communists to make Indira the PM by splitting congress and ensuring Communist party support to her PM ship in 1967. That is how the whole game was played. Indira family followed by Sonia were directly controlled by KGB. Is it not surprising that just the way every opponent of Indira died mysteriously, every person who cud challenge Sonia also died prematurely in accidents.
     
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  13. Lion of Rajputana

    Lion of Rajputana Captain FULL MEMBER

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    I found this part really interesting in particular, could you please elaborate?
     
  14. Vyom

    Vyom Captain GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

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    1. YSR
    2. Rajesh Pilot
    3. Madhav rao Scindhia
    4. Sanjay Gandhi
    5. Rajiv Gandhi
    6. Lalit Narayan Mishra
     

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