Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Why are India's air force planes falling out of the sky?

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by HMS Astute, Oct 17, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Factbox: The 11 countries expected to buy F-35 fighter jet
    WASHINGTON Thu Jun 5, 2014 6:56pm EDT


    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Canada is poised to buy 65 F-35 fighter jets built by Lockheed Martin Corp, sources familiar with the process told Reuters, which would make it the 11th country to join the program.
    The United States and its allies plan to buy more than 3,100 F-35s in coming years to replace aging F-16s, F/A-18s and other warplanes.
    Following is a list of the expected purchases, according to data provided by Lockheed, the prime contractor for the $398.6 billion weapons program, and defense officials in the United States and other purchasing countries.
    Lockheed is developing three models of the plane for the U.S. military and eight partner countries that helped fund the plane's development - Britain, Australia, Italy, Turkey, the Netherlands, Denmark, Norway and Canada.
    South Korea, Japan and Israel have also placed orders for the jet.
    U.S AIR FORCE
    The U.S. Air Force plans to buy a total of 1,763 F-35 conventional landing A-models through 2037.
    The Air Force is training F-35 pilots and technicians at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, and recently began night training flights at the base. More than 100 pilots have been qualified to fly the jet and more than 1,000 technicians have also been trained to service it.
    The Air Force is also flying jets at bases in Nevada and Arizona.
    U.S. NAVY
    Current plans call for the U.S. Navy to buy 260 C-model F-35s, which have longer wings and a special tailhook that allows them to land on aircraft carriers. Lockheed and the F-35 program are testing a redesigned tailhook, with at-sea testing due to take place in the fall of 2014.
    U.S. MARINE CORPS
    The Marine Corps, the smallest of the U.S. military branches, plans to buy 340 F-35 B-models, which can take off from shorter runways and land vertically, and 80 F-35 C-models to replace its current fleet of F/A-18 Hornets, EA-6B Prowlers, and AV-8B Harrier "jump jets."
    The Marines are flying jets at an air base in Arizona, and say they are on track to start using the F-35Bs by mid-2015.
    Later this month, the Marine Corps is also due to start receiving F-35 jets at an air base in Beaufort, South Carolina, where it plans to train dozens of pilots and service technicians each year.
    BRITAIN
    The Royal Air Force and Royal Navy, which have invested $2 billion to help develop the new warplane, plan to buy a total of 138 F-35 B-models.
    Britain has so far committed to buying 48 of the new planes, and is expected to announce plans for the next 14 jets this year. It has already received three jets.
    The F-35B will make its first appearance at two air shows in Britain next month. Weather permitting, the plane will also make a brief fly-by appearance at the naming ceremony for Britain's new aircraft carrier on July 4.
    ITALY
    Italy initially planned to buy 131 F-35 fighters, but curtailed its order to 90 jets in 2012. It is slated to buy 60 F-35A models and 30 F-35Bs.
    Italy's state-owned defense company Finmeccanica is one of the subcontractors on the project and its Alenia unit will assemble the planes purchased by Italy, the Netherlands and Norway at a large facility in northern Italy.
    THE NETHERLANDS
    The Dutch military initially planned to buy 85 F-35As in coming years but announced in September that it would buy just 37 jets for now, and could order more later. It has already received two jets that will be used for training.
    TURKEY
    Turkey is slated to buy 100 F-35As and has placed a firm order for the first two jets.
    AUSTRALIA
    Australia is slated to buy 100 F-35As, with the first jet to be delivered later this year. In April, Australia announced plans to buy 58 jets in addition to the 14 already ordered.
    NORWAY
    Norway plans to buy 52 F-35A fighter jets and has authorized the purchase of 16 jets.
    DENMARK
    Denmark was slated to buy 30 F-35As, but it has launched a fresh competition that will not be decided until the end of June 2015.
    CANADA
    Canada was poised to buy 65 F-35As for C$9 billion but announced in December 2012 that it would evaluate all available options for new fighters. This followed an outcry over the government's decision to buy the F-35 without an open competition.
    Canada is expected to formally decide in June whether to proceed with its planned F-35 purchase.
    ISRAEL
    Israel has ordered 19 F-35 jets and plans to order up to 75 jets in coming years. A second order could come later this year.
    JAPAN
    Japan announced in December 2011 that it was ordering 42 F-35 A-model jets and may order more in coming years. Japan is also building a final assembly and checkout plant for the jets.
    SOUTH KOREA
    South Korea has confirmed its plans to buy 40 F-35A jets to replacing its aging F-4 jets.
    OTHER COUNTRIES
    Singapore and Belgium are among other countries that have expressed interest in the Lockheed fighter jet

    Considering these are the monkey versions as the Russian call the planes they sell India and they wont include the computer codes, plus the cost I would assume the main reasons the above countries are buying the F35 is classified information that is not being made public. Contrary to popular opinion the US has never offered to sell F35s to India or the F22 to anyone. At most we have informed India we would discuss selling them the F35 if they were interested. In reality India is not technological enough advanced to operate the F35.
     
    HMS Astute likes this.
  2. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    All the basic requirements for modern civilization – democracy, education, wealth, health and corruption – are strongly related to national IQs
     
  3. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1,584
    Likes Received:
    577
    Country Flag:
    India
    Reputation of you being jingostic nincompoop is well earned did I post IAF is strong than china etc etc?? You were the one who put out the comparizon, now you are talking about POK and aksin chin

    Again you go round and round this shows how big a dumb head you have let me help you with some facts. China has aksin chin which is claimed by India as part of ladakh ,and India controls arunachal pradesh which is 3 to 4 times the size of aksin chin so it is vise versa suituation

    We lost 1962 war with china, in 1967 we pushed them out of sikkim in chola incident and in 1987 border clash tge LOC was pushed with them to tibet this is brief history with chinese

    Coming to pakistani POK is one third the size of indian admisnistered kashmir and war with pakistan , creation of bangladesh I guess you know that

    Taking about courage we fought our war on our own both the one which we won and lost not with a gang of rabbies dogs called NATO. Inspite of having airforce 3 big as russia , china and india

    Cowards like you and your NATO baboons should drink more milk since you people are Infant's, rather than talking about courage of other nation check your courage in vietnam where you got whupped all over
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
     
    HMS Astute likes this.
  5. HMS Astute

    HMS Astute BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    399
    Country Flag:
    Falkland Islands (malvinas)
    New Chinese J31 5th generation aircraft (stolen design) for the carriers.

    [​IMG]
     
    Zeus_@21 likes this.
  6. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    [​IMG]

    I am of the opinion that the Chinese aircraft carrier are too small to operate planes like the E2 hawkeye. With out them they are going to be blind.
     
  7. HMS Astute

    HMS Astute BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    399
    Country Flag:
    Falkland Islands (malvinas)
    I think they're planning to build 2x additional carriers which will have similar size like the US supercarriers (100,000 tons).
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    NORFOLK: The famed “eyes of the fleet” are getting sharper. The Navy has declared the latest variant, the E-2D radar plane, ready for real-world operations just in time for the 50th anniversary of the original E-2 Hawkeye. The first five-plane squadron will deploy on the USS Theodore Roosevelt next year. Meanwhile, the current E-2C models are playing an essential role in the Middle East, launching from the USS George Bush to serve as flying command posts and air traffic control for the ongoing strikes against the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
    “The CAG [Carrier Air Group] and the admiral would not go into harm’s way without an E-2,” said Capt. Drew Basden, commodore of the Navy’s Hawkeye force, “and that’s an E-2C.” While almost indistinguishable to the eye, the new E-2D version brings a much more powerful and discriminating radar — so much so, Basden told reporters visiting here, that the D may eventually do ballistic missile defense. That remark is one clue among many that the Navy wants the Advanced Hawkeye not just to do the current E-2C’s job better, as critical as it is, but to play a larger role.
    [​IMG]
    Capt. Drew Basden
    One sign of that larger role is simply a larger squadron: There’ll be five Ds aboard each carrier instead of the current four Cs. That squadron size, in turn, helps drive Navy plans to buy 75 of the $150 million Advanced Hawkeyes, more than the maximum number of Cs ever in service. (Only 52 “Charlies” remain today due to aging and accidents). Five planes per carrier is still probably not enough to keep one in the air at all times, but it will allow more constant coverage. An E-2D can stay aloft about five hours at a time on its own fuel, but in August the Navy completed the preliminary design review for an upgrade to allow mid-air refueling, something no Hawkeye has ever had.
    Even with aerial refueling, though, the Hawkeye’s human crew will limit its endurance. The Navy’s new MQ-4C Triton reconnaissance drone, for example, is designed for 24-hour missions, although its size restricts it to land bases. The future Unmanned Carrier-Launched Surveillance & Strike (UCLASS) drone, while compact enough to operate off a carrier, will be designed to fly for 14 hours. (Unlike the Hawkeye and Triton, the UCLASS will also be armed, albeit lightly and controversially). Even the modestly sized MQ-8C Fire Scout, an unmanned helicopter able to operate off small vessels, can stay aloft for 10-12 hours.
    [​IMG]
    E-2C Hawkeye aboard ship.
    But shorter missions is the price Hawkeye must pay for having human brains aboard, which are essential to its role as a flying command post that can direct air operations without relaying every tactical decision back to the carrier. Robots are great at carrying radars and other sensors, but not at sorting out the real-time chaos of combat, let alone making life-or-death decisions.
    How the Advanced Hawkeye will interact with the Navy’s expanding drone force is still up in the air. The E-2D’s bandwidth and other electronic capabilities are much greater than the C model’s, and there’s talk of upgrading the new Hawkeye to receive feeds from drones or to even control them, but that’s not in the current program. “With respect to any additional requirements to communicate with UAVs [unmanned air vehicles], those requirements are being looked at,” said Capt. John Lemmon, the E-2 program manager at Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR).
    The E-2D also carries unspecified “electronic support measures” (ESM) equipment and will play a significant role in the Navy’s new vision of “electromagnetic maneuver warfare” — but these systems are so highly classified that the Navy officials at Norfolk politely refused to provide any detail.
    [​IMG]
    Capt. John Lemmon (left) and Cdr. John Heweitt (right).
    What the service will say is that the Hawkeye is central to its new network for long-range warfare against enemy planes and missiles, Naval Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air. NIFC-CA shares detailed targeting information across the fleet, giving each linked ship and aircraft a much clearer picture of the enemy that it could get using its own sensors. An Aegis destroyer, for example, might use NIFCA-CA data to shoot down a distant enemy beyond the range of its own shipboard radars. While some modernized E-2Cs have the same datalinks that the E-2D has, the Advanced Hawkeye has a much more powerful, precise radar to provide targeting data to the network.
    “The Delta’s linkage to NIFC-CA has everything to do with the radar,” said Cdr. John Hewitt, who runs E-2D training. “The precision that you would need… you could not do in the Charlie [i.e. the E-2C].” The C-model, with its traditional mechanical radar, was designed to combat a Soviet-style threat — “think Tu-95 bear bombers and Udaloy destroyers,” Hewitt said — in “blue water” far from shore. “It’s still doing that job very well, [but] it had its limits in a littoral/over-land environment,” he said. The D-model’s solid-state radar, by contrast, can pick up “very small contacts, air and surface, over land, over water,” he said. “The aircraft does not care.”
    [​IMG]
    An E-2C Hawkeye (left) and an E-2D Advanced Hawkeye (right). While almost indistinguishable from the outside, the D carries a much more powerful radar and electronics.
     
  9. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1,584
    Likes Received:
    577
    Country Flag:
    India
    Look at these two cartoons discussing about chinese J-31 and E-2 hawkeye on Indian airforce thread , lunatics at its best
     
  10. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States

    Would think they would, but its a complicated learning process.

    The USA built more then 150 carriers between 1942 and 1945, that's 70 years ago, so far neither China, Russia, or India has built a real carrier other then some jeep carriers as we call them.
     
  11. HMS Astute

    HMS Astute BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    399
    Country Flag:
    Falkland Islands (malvinas)
    They're still in the process of observing what the Blue Water navy is all about, whereas the navies of US, UK and France etc have been doing it since many centuries ago. Regarding with the Indian air force, most of the crashed aircraft was because of human errors and inadequate maintenance. It happens especially when they operate old aircraft.
     
  12. HMS Astute

    HMS Astute BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    399
    Country Flag:
    Falkland Islands (malvinas)
    Yeah, same goes to the Royal Navy too. Just have a look...

    List of aircraft carriers of the Royal Navy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    List of escort carriers of the Royal Navy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    BTW, did you read the story when the Indian Airforce spend months tracking unidentified fly overs only to find out later that they were intercepting Venus and Jupiter?
     
  13. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1,584
    Likes Received:
    577
    Country Flag:
    India
    Good sense of humour . I guess aircraft carrier got whupped by japanese in world war 2 later sailors became shark food eg: USS hornet, USS langsey, USS lenxington etc
    .Not the jeep carrier hence jeep carrier is good right
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014
  14. sam2012

    sam2012 Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1,584
    Likes Received:
    577
    Country Flag:
    India
    No infact it was Tu-95 bear with tsar bomb on board which make you and your half brother piss in pant

    And it is universal truth only bull head royal crap airforce will think of intercepting planets with yard stick we are not that genius like RAF
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014
  15. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2013
    Messages:
    2,885
    Likes Received:
    1,288
    If we go for the madness that you are suggesting. Will the world be able to bear the cost?? I think, The first one to preach about world peace in UN will be uncle Sam.

    They still lagging behind in engine tech. Even tough it looks pretty similar to F-35 design.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page