Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

World Military Strength, The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by santosh, Mar 27, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India

     
  2. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    India's military strength on the rise
    April 15, 2013

    India has successfully test-fired an "Agni II" surface-to-surface ballistic missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead of one ton. The missile, equipped with solid fuel engines, has a range of 2,000 km. According to Russian newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta, the launch once again proved that India has a reliable deterrent. As one of the world's largest arms-importing countries, India's weapons and equipment replacement program have been designed in response to armed conflict with Pakistan and to contend with increasingly military powerful China. For Russia, the consolidation of India's military forces goes hand-in-hand with Russia's strategic interests. :coffee:

    [​IMG]

    India's self-developed "Fearless" domestic subsonic medium-range cruise missile looks like the U.S. "Tomahawk" cruise missile. :coffee:

    As The Economist pointed out, the overall strength of the Indian armed forces is rapidly increasing. In the last five years, India had imported most arms in the world. For a long time, Russia has been India's main weapon supplier. According to a report released by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, India purchased weapons and equipment worth a total of $ 17.3 billion from Russia from 2007 to 2011. Additionally, India is in negotiations with French Dassault to buy 126 Rafale fighters, worth a total amount of over 12 billion dollars.

    In terms of army-size, the total strength of the Indian Army in Asia comes next to China's. India's defense budget has reached $ 46.8 billion. In the construction of nuclear power, India has 80 or more nuclear weapons, and the number is likely to increase further. As to the country's power in terms of nuclear weapons, India's surface-to-surface missiles appear able to cover the whole territory of Pakistan and most parts of China.

    New Delhi believes that instability in Pakistan and the world's second-largest economy China, are most likely to pose a threat to India's security. From a geopolitical point of view, China undoubtedly catches the Indian leaders' attention. As Indian Defense Minister Antony had declared in 2009, "India's major threat is not Pakistan, but China."

    Recently, despite India-Pakistan relations showing signs of abating, the situation still carries the possibility of escalating at any given time. China, as Pakistan's traditional ally, may help Islamabad in its fight against India. China, although it has never formally stated its stance on this matter, has provided Pakistan with a large number of weapons and nuclear technology, according to Nezavisimaya Gazeta.

    In addition to the Pakistani army, several jihadist communities active in Pakistan have also caught India's attention. These communities frequently organize terrorist attacks on domestic Indian objectives.

    "Bharatiya Janata Party, one of the two major political parties in India, has strong nationalist tendencies. It has opposed the partition scheme implemented by the UK and advocates the re-inclusion of Pakistan in India's territory. This claim, although not recognized by the Indian government and mainstream political forces, is likely to affect the relationship between India and Pakistan," Tatiana Shomyan, director of the Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, said in an interview with Nezavisimaya Gazeta.

    New Delhi is seeking to normalize relations with Islamabad. But no one knows what will happen next if the U.S. and NATO pull out of Afghanistan.

    "The border dispute between China and India is not a major problem. The border situation is stable. What disturbs India most is that China is establishing and consolidating new outposts around India, especially in the Indian Ocean area. A Chinese company has obtained control of Pakistan's Gwadar Port. In addition, China also hopes to perfect its naval support capabilities with the help from Sri Lanka. India is in response expanding its naval force. It is not having a conflict with China, but competing for influence in South Asia," Tatiana Shomyan remarked on Sino-Indian Relations.

    In order to maintain the strategic balance within the region, India is likely to seek the support of Moscow. Traditionally, India and Russia have maintained friendly relations at a political level, and this relationship has never been affected by any other geo-political disputes.

    India's military strength on the rise - China.org.cn
     
    Gessler likes this.
  3. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    Eye on future, India mulls options for nuclear-powered aircraft carrier
    Aug 1, 2013

    NEW DELHI: Nothing projects raw power like an aircraft carrier prowling on the high seas, capable of unleashing strike fighters against an adversary in a jiffy. A nuclear-powered carrier can make the punch even deadlier with much longer operational endurance.

    With its first indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC) set to be "launched" at Cochin Shipyard on August 12, and sea trials of the first nuclear submarine INS Arihant to begin shortly after, India is now examining the possibility of having a nuclear-powered 65,000-tonne carrier in the future.

    Navy vice-chief Vice Admiral RK Dhowan on Thursday said a "detailed study" was underway on the "size, type of aircraft and their launch and recovery systems, propulsion" and the like for the IAC-II project. "Yes, we are also considering nuclear propulsion. All options are being studied. No final decision has been taken," he said.

    There are huge cost issues with nuclear-powered carriers, which can easily take upwards of $10 billion to build. The Royal British Navy is reverting to carriers propelled by gas turbines/diesel-electric systems from nuclear ones.

    However, the US has 11 Nimitz-class "super-carriers" — each an over 94,000-tonne behemoth powered by two nuclear reactors and capable of carrying 80-90 fighters - to project power around the globe. China, too, is now looking at nuclear-powered carriers after inducting its first conventional carrier — the 65,000-tonne Liaoning — last September.

    So, while Navy may want a nuclear-powered carrier, it will ultimately have to be a considered political decision. The force, however, is firm about its long-term plan to operate three carrier-battle groups (CBGs). "One carrier for each (western and eastern) seaboard and one in maintenance," said Vice Admiral Dhowan.

    But, even two CBGs will be possible only by 2019. The 40,000-tonne IAC, to be christened INS Vikrant, will be ready for induction only by December 2018, as was first reported by TOI.

    "Design and construction of a carrier has many challenges. Around 75% of the IAC structure has now been erected. India joins only four countries the US, Russia, the UK and France - capable of building a carrier over 40,000-tonne," he said.

    The 44,570-tonne INS Vikramaditya - or the Admiral Gorshkov carrier now undergoing sea trials after a $2.33-billion refit in Russia - in turn will be ready by end-2013 instead of the original August 2008 deadline. :tup:

    Vice Admiral Dhowan admitted India's solitary carrier, the 28,000-tonne INS Viraat, will soldier on till 2018 due to these long delays. The 54-year-old INS Viraat is left with just 11 Sea Harrier jump-jets to operate from its deck. The 45 MiG-29K naval fighters, being procured from Russia for over $2 billion, can operate only from Vikramaditya and IAC.

    The 260-metre-long IAC, whose construction finally began in November 2006, will be able to carry 12 MiG-29Ks, eight Tejas light combat aircraft and 10 early-warning and anti-submarine helicopters on its 2.5-acre flight deck and hangars. It will have a crew of 160 officers and 1,400 sailors. Powered by four American LM2500 gas turbines, the IAC will have an endurance of around 7,500 nautical miles at a speed of 18 knots. :coffee:

    Eye on future, India mulls options for nuclear-powered aircraft carrier - Times Of India
     
  4. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    India, US ink $1billion deal for six Super Hercules aircraft
    28 Dec, 2013

    NEW DELHI: The ongoing diplomatic kerfuffle over the Devyani Khobragade episode is no hurdle as far defence deals with the US are concerned. India and the US have inked another mega contract, the $1.01 billion one for six additional C-130J "Super Hercules" aircraft, while some others are being finalized.

    Defence ministry sources said the "letter of offer and acceptance" for the six new four-engine C-130Js, which will be delivered within three years, was signed on Friday under the US government's "foreign military sales" (FMS) programme.

    IAF already has six C-130Js tactical airlift aircraft, ordered for $962 million in 2007, which are based at the Hindon airbase on the outskirts of Delhi. The six new C-130Js, also configured for "special operations" as the first six, will be based at Panagarh in West Bengal.

    Panagarh will also house the headquarters of the new mountain strike corps, christened XVII Corps with a total of over 80,000 soldiers, being raised by the Army in a project worth around Rs 90,000 crore. This new co ..

    The rugged C-130J, as also the bigger C-17 Globemaster-III strategic airlift aircraft acquired from the US, can even land at a small forward airbase on a semi-prepared runway. Crucial to counter China's massive build-up of border infrastructure, this capability was amply demonstrated when IAF landed a C-130J on the Daulat Beg Oldi airstrip in eastern Ladakh, at an altitude of 16,614-feet just seven-km from the LAC, in August this year.

    The US has already bagged deals close to $10 billion over the last decade in the lucrative Indian defence market. The other deals on the anvil are the ones for 22 Apache attack helicopters, 15 Chinook heavy-lift choppers, four P-8I maritime patrol aircraft and 145 M-777 ultra-light howitzers, together worth another $4 billion or so. :tup:

    India, US ink $1billion deal for six Super Hercules aircraft - The Economic Times
     
  5. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    => Tejas an ideal replacement for MiG, says Antony - The Hindu :cheers:


    LCA mech2 Vs JF17 block1 & 2

    I made a post while comparing these two 4.5 gen aircrafts, as below. i think this post may also have a place in this thread :tup:

    => JF-17 is an obsolete and cheap aircraft- Richard Aboulafa | Page 17 | Indian Defence Forum
     
  6. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India

    Trends in U.S. Military Spending

    Military budgets are only one gauge of military power. A given financial commitment may be adequate or inadequate depending on the number and capability of a nation's adversaries, how well a country invests its funds, and what it seeks to accomplish, among other factors. Nevertheless, trends in military spending do reveal something about a country's capacity for coercion. Policymakers are currently debating the appropriate level of U.S. military spending given increasingly constrained budgets and the winding down of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The following charts present historical trends in U.S. military spending and analyze the forces that may drive it lower.

    These charts draw on data from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) and from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). Both data sets include spending on overseas contingency operations as well as defense. This distinguishes them from data used in the U.S. budget, which separates defense spending from spending on overseas operations. :coffee:

    [​IMG]

    In inflation-adjusted dollars, SIPRI's measure of U.S. military spending rose sharply after the terrorist attacks of 2001.

    In calendar year 2012, military spending declined from $711 billion to $668 billion.

    In dollar terms, this was the largest decline since 1991.

    The reduction in U.S. operations in the Middle East and the sequester mean this figure is likely to fall again in 2013.

    [​IMG]

    When U.S. inflation-adjusted military spending fell by one-third in the 1990s, the U.S. share of global military spending only fell by six percentage points because other countries, particularly Russia, reduced their military spending as well.

    The 6 percent fall in U.S. military spending in 2012 resulted in a two percentage point fall in the global share, as military spending by the rest of the world remained essentially flat.

    To see why U.S. military spending is likely to keep falling as a share of global military spending, even if the sequester does not go into effect, it helps to look at the drivers of this ratio. For any country, a change in military spending as a share of the global total can be attributed to two factors: changes in income and changes in the allocation of that income. A rising share of global military expenditure based on a rising share of global GDP (gross domestic product) is likely to be more sustainable over the long term than a rise based on a decision to spend more of GDP on defense at the expense of other priorities. The following charts distinguish between the impact of growth and the allocation of income on the U.S. share of global military spending.

    From 1990 to 2000, U.S. growth roughly kept pace with global growth. So the impact of U.S. growth on the nation's share of global military spending (represented by the red bars) offset the impact of rest-of-the-world growth (represented by the purple bars). As a result, the net growth effect, shown by the blue line, was close to zero.

    Over the past ten years, faster foreign growth has reduced the U.S. share of global military spending


    The black line shows the U.S. share of world military spending at five-year intervals, while the bars show what drove the change during each five-year period. The blue bars show how willing the nation has been since 2000 to spend a rising share of GDP on defense. Even if one assumes this commitment holds steady in the next five years, and if one uses International Monetary Fund (IMF) growth estimates, the U.S. share of military spending is set to decline as U.S. GDP growth (represented by the red bar) is lower than that of other military powers (represented by the purple bar). :coffee:

    [​IMG]


    If the United States decided to spend a smaller share of GDP on the military, the black line on the previous page would decline more sharply still. How likely is this? The following two charts show how U.S. overseas operations have been shrinking and that they are likely to continue to do so.


    Overall funding for overseas contingency operations has declined by just over 50 percent since 2008 as the war in Iraq has wound down.

    Funding for the two operations was as high as $187 billion in fiscal year 2008, which represents 30 percent of SIPRI's measure of U.S. military spending for that year.

    War funding is projected to come to $79 billion in fiscal year 2014, but it is likely to decline thereafter with the winding down of the war in Afghanistan.


    As of fiscal year 2013, the number of troops deployed in Afghanistan and Iraq has declined 66 percent since fiscal year 2008.

    The Department of Defense projects troop levels will decline a further 40 percent in fiscal year 2014.

    The following charts provide some historical perspective on military spending.

    U.S. national defense spending has ranged widely, from less than 1 percent of GDP in 1929 up to 43 percent in 1944. These extremes illustrate that resource allocation to defense can increase rapidly when a war demands it.

    Focusing just on the post-World War II period, U.S. national defense spending as a percent of GDP has ranged from a high of 15 percent in 1952 (during the Korean War) to a low of 3.7 percent in 2000 (the period of relative tranquility preceding the terrorist attacks of the following year).


    In the post-Cold War world, the U.S. national defense budget has fluctuated within a relatively narrow band. It fell by about three percentage points of GDP as the nation reaped the peace dividend of the 1990s, then rose after the terrorist attacks of 2001.

    President Barack Obama's budget proposes cutting security spending to 2.4% of GDP in 2023. This would represent the lowest allocation of GDP to defense spending in the post-World War II era.


    The United States' and its allies' share of world military spending fell from 2005 to 2010. It is projected to fall further, to 60 percent by 2015, even if U.S. spending as a share of GDP holds up at today's levels. Budgetary pressures in Europe may mean this share falls even more rapidly.
    [​IMG]


    Democracies are generally regarded as friendly to the United States, and this chart delivers a similar verdict to the last one. :coffee:

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union, democracies accounted for the vast majority of the world's military spending.

    However, since the early 1990s, this share has declined slightly.

    [​IMG]

    In 2012, U.S. military spending fell faster than overall military spending by democracies.

    However, the United States continues to account for almost half of all military spending by democracies.

    A decline in U.S. military spending is therefore likely to have a large impact on democracies' military spending as a share of the global total. :tup:

    Trends in U.S. Military Spending - Council on Foreign Relations
     
  7. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    i believe, you may only have either ingenuously developed arms or it would at least come with full tech transfer, for either MRCA aircrafts, or P75I project etc too. as discussed in the thread, post#35 (and also post#37), as below too :coffee:

    => Defining Reliable Friends, India's Strategic Defense Relations | Page 3 | Indian Defence Forum
     
  8. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    one day we discussed it. Capital Expenditure of Indian Defence is around 40% of total expenditure, with around 50% to 70% of it is spent in buying foreign arms, considering the fact that most of the production line of the main arms like SU30mki, T90s, HAWK etc is in fact based in India itself. so this way we find around 90% of total Defence Expenditure is spent in India itself, somehow, some way :tup:

    one gentleman also calculated the same in a post, as below :coffee:
     
  9. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    India inducts C-17 Globemaster III aircraft

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Indian Air Force is now ready to get the C-17 Globemaster III heavy-lift transport aircraft into the force. The beastly plane arrived in India for induction on the 22nd January this year and underwent inspection and routine flight testing before formal induction.

    Now that the tests have successfully completed, the aircraft will be formally inducted into service tomorrow by the Defence Minister A K Antony at the Hindon Air Base.

    As IAF’s biggest aircraft, 70-tonne C-17 heavy-lift transport beast will bolster IAF's capability to swiftly transport combat troops and equipment such as tanks to the front.

    The Defence Minister will formally induct the aircraft (being manufactured by Boeing)procured from the US under a deal expected to be over Rs 20,000 crore into the newly-formed 81 'Skylord' Squadron here, IAF officials said here. The IAF has placed orders with the US for ten such aircraft under the deal signed in 2011 and three of them have already been delivered.

    Describing the induction of the C-17 Globemaster III in the Indian Air Force as a ‘defining moment’, Shri Antony said, “With this, the IAF has taken a giant stride towards its goal of acquiring multi- spectrum strategic capabilities, essential to safeguard India’s growing areas of interest”.

    The American C-17, with a capability to carry around 80 tonnes of load and around 150 fully geared troops, will replace the Russian Il-76 as the biggest aircraft in the IAF inventory till now. :tup:

    The Il-76 had the capability to carry loads upto around 40 tonnes. They are expected to enhance the operational potential of the IAF with its payload carriage and performance capability and would augment the strategic reach during disaster relief or any similar missions.

    The US Air Force will complete the delivery of all the 10 aircraft by the end of next year. After the completion of the 10 aircraft, the IAF may also exercise the option of procuring six more planes for its fleet. :tup:

    India inducts C-17 Globemaster III aircraft into its Air Force - daily.bhaskar.com

     
  10. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

    The Boeing C-17 Globemaster III is a large military transport aircraft. It was developed for the United States Air Force (USAF) from the 1980s to the early 1990s by McDonnell Douglas. The C-17 carries the name of two previous piston-engined military cargo aircraft, the Douglas C-74 Globemaster and the Douglas C-124 Globemaster II. The C-17 commonly performs strategic airlift missions, transporting troops and cargo throughout the world; additional roles include tactical airlift, medical evacuation and airdrop duties.

    Boeing, which merged with McDonnell Douglas in the 1990s, continues to manufacture C-17s for export customers following the end of deliveries to the U.S. Air Force. The C-17 is operated by the U.S. Air Force, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, NATO Heavy Airlift Wing, and India.

    [​IMG]

    The C-17 is 174 feet (53 m) long and has a wingspan of about 170 feet (52 m). It can airlift cargo fairly close to a battle area. The size and weight of U.S. mechanized firepower and equipment have grown in recent decades from increased air mobility requirements, particularly for large or heavy non-palletized outsize cargo.

    The C-17 is powered by four Pratt & Whitney F117-PW-100 turbofan engines, which are based on the commercial Pratt and Whitney PW2040 used on the Boeing 757. Each engine is rated at 40,400 lbf (180 kN) of thrust. The engine's thrust reversers direct engine exhaust air upwards and forward, reducing the chances of foreign object damage by ingestion of runway debris, and providing enough reverse thrust to back the aircraft up on the ground while taxiing. The thrust reversers can also be used in flight at idle-reverse for added drag in maximum-rate descents.

    The aircraft requires a crew of three (pilot, copilot, and loadmaster) for cargo operations. Cargo is loaded through a large aft ramp that accommodates rolling stock, such as a 69-ton (63-metric ton) M1 Abrams main battle tank, other armored vehicles, trucks, and trailers, along with palletized cargo. The cargo compartment is 88 feet (26.82 m) long by 18 feet (5.49 m) wide by 12 feet 4 inches (3.76 m) high. The cargo floor has rollers for palletized cargo that can be flipped to provide a flat floor suitable for vehicles and other rolling stock.

    Maximum payload of the C-17 is 170,900 lb (77,500 kg), and its Maximum Takeoff Weight is 585,000 lb (265,350 kg). With a payload of 160,000 lb (72,600 kg) and an initial cruise altitude of 28,000 ft (8,500 m), the C-17 has an unrefueled range of about 2,400 nautical miles (4,400 km) on the first 71 aircraft, and 2,800 nautical miles (5,200 km) on all subsequent extended-range models that include sealed center wing bay as a fuel tank. Boeing informally calls these aircraft the C-17 ER.[45] The C-17's cruise speed is about 450 knots (833 km/h) (Mach 0.74). It is designed to airdrop 102 paratroopers and their equipment.[46] The U.S. Army's Ground Combat Vehicle is to be transported by the C-17. :coffee:

    The C-17 is designed to operate from runways as short as 3,500 ft (1,064 m) and as narrow as 90 ft (27 m). In addition, the C-17 can operate from unpaved, unimproved runways (although with greater chance of damage to the aircraft).[46] The thrust reversers can be used to back the aircraft and reverse direction on narrow taxiways using a three- (or more) point turn.[46]


    Indian Air Force

    In June 2009, the Indian Air Force (IAF) selected the C-17 to fulfill its Very Heavy Lift Transport Aircraft requirement,[112][113][114] and to replace its fleet of aging transport planes.[115][116] In January 2010, the U.S. Government received a request from India for 10 C-17s through the U.S.'s Foreign Military Sales program,[117] which was approved by the U.S. Congress in June 2010.[118] On 23 June 2010, the Indian Air Force successfully test-landed a USAF C-17 at the Gaggal Airport, India to complete the IAF's C-17 trials.[119] In February 2011, the IAF and Boeing agreed to terms for the order of 10 C-17s[120] with an option for six more; the order was approved by the Indian Cabinet Committee on Security on 6 June 2011. :tup:[121][122][123] Deliveries began in June 2013 and are to continue until 2014.[124][125] The total cost of the ten-plane order is US$4.1 billion, and it will make IAF the second-largest C-17 operator.[115] It was reported that the Indian Air Force has finalized plans to buy six more C-17s in the 13th five-year plan (2017-2022).[126][127][128]

    The aircraft provides strategic airlift and the ability to deploy special forces in the event of national emergencies or terrorism.[129] They are operated by the air force in diverse terrain - from Himalayan air bases in North India at 13,000 ft to Indian Ocean bases in South India.[130] The Indian Air Force's C-17s are based at Hindon Air Force Station,[131][132] and are operated by the No. 81 Squadron Skylords.[133][134][135] The first C-17 was delivered in January 2013 for testing and training;[136] it was officially accepted on 11 June 2013.[137] The second C-17 was delivered on 23 July 2013 and put into service immediately. IAF Chief of Air Staff Norman AK Browne called the Globemaster III "a major component in the IAF's modernization drive" while taking delivery of the aircraft at Boeing's Long Beach factory.[138] On 2 September 2013, the Skylords squadron with three C-17s officially entered service with the Indian Air Force.[139]

    The Skylords regularly fly mission within India, to places like Port Blair, Leh and Thoise. The IAF first used the C-17 to transport equipment of an army infantry battalion to Port Blair on 1 July 2013.[140] They have also been sent on foreign deployments. These include a flight to Tajikistan in August which carried special equipment and instrument landing aids, and another flight is planned in September for Rwanda to deliver heavy equipment to support the 4,000 Indian troops deployed in Congo as part of Indian Army United Nations peacekeeping missions.[128] One C-17 was used for transporting relief materials during Cyclone Phailin.[141][142] The fifth aircraft was received in November 2013.[143]

    Boeing C-17 Globemaster III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
    Gessler likes this.
  11. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    .
    =>
    Russia says in race to bag mega sub deal - Indian Express
    => Russia says in race to bag mega sub deal - Indian Express
    => Looking for Project 75-I to have vertical launched BrahMos missiles- Sivathanu Pillai | Russia & India Report :cheers:

    Thats the main issue. for example, if we compare SU30mki deal of India with Rafale, then we know that you may get few higher techs but even if you may get 70%+ tech transfer in Rafale deal then also you will be lucky. while Su30mki came with 100% tech transfer over the period of time, from raw to products, while its also fit in comparison to Rafale, a 4++ generation aircraft too....

    we also have example of Scorpion Submarines Deal from France too. over 300% price hike has been taken place to date, with 4 years + delay to date, considering the best scenario of its delivery from 2016+, while full tech transfer will never be a possibility......

    while Im mainly fan of China, whose submarines are of no comparison to the Western ones, but they have their technologies by themselves. and considering successful induction of Akula 2 recently, we find only Russia providing the Submarines, which are of the comparison to European ones, with full tech transfer over the period of time too :tup:

    i mean, you would either build arms by yourself like China, or go for the 100% tech transfer deals only, to help your domestic submarine projects too:india:
     
  12. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    double post
     
  13. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    426
    Country Flag:
    India
    India closes in on $20 billion Rafale deal despite last ditch bids by US, UK, Germany
    16 Jul, 2014

    [​IMG]
    India is quietly continuing its final negotiations for acquiring 126 French Rafale fighters under the almost $20 billion MMRCA :coffee:
    @Picdelamirand-oil

    NEW DELHI: Unruffled by the lastditch bids being made by countries like the US, UK, Germany and Sweden to wade into the "mother of all defence deals", India is quietly continuing its final negotiations for acquiring 126 French Rafale fighters under the almost $20 billion MMRCA (medium multi-role combat aircraft) project. :tup:

    Defence ministry sources on Monday said another meeting of a sub-committee of the ongoing CNC (contract negotiation committee), which includes representatives from MoD, IAF, DRDO and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), is slated to take place on July 17-19 in Bangalore with the French companies led by Dassault Aviation.

    As reported by TOI last month, the complex negotiations have now reached a stage from where they can be wrapped up in the next three months, with over 50 per cent of the final contract as well as the inter-govern mental agreement already finalized. "After that, it will be a political call. The approval process will go right up to the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) before the contract can be inked," said a source.

    Once the project is finalized, the first 18 jets are to be delivered to IAF within 36-48 months, while the rest 108 will be manufactured by HAL with transfer of technology over the next seven years.

    With the final lap in sight, a lot of heat and dust is now being generated by the rivals earlier eliminated from the race after exhaustive technical and commercial evaluations since the MMRCA selection process began way back in August 2007. Last week, for instance, visiting British foreign secretary William Hague lobbied hard for the Eurofighter Typhoon, which is backed by the UK, Germany , Spain and Italy, during his meetings with the Modi government. Germany , too, is learnt to have renewed the push for the Typhoons.

    Similarly, the US lobby still harbours hope that either the F/ A-18 `Super Hornet' or the F-16 `Super Viper' can fly back into the MMRCA competition, and it will set the "right tone" for PM Modi's meeting with President Obama in Washington in September.

    But the Indian defence establishment is quite clear there can be"no comebacks" in the ongoing MMRCA project."There are only two possibilities. One, the deal is inked for the Rafale jets. Conversely , the entire MMRCA process is scrapped, after being in the works for a decade, with a fresh global tender or RFP (request for proposal) being issued," said the source.

    With IAF down to 34 fighter squadrons, when at least 44 are required, IAF has identified the MMRCA project as its"topmost priority" for the Modi government.

    India closes in on $20 billion Rafale deal despite lastditch bids by US, UK, Germany - The Economic Times
     
  14. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    160 million per plane, wow, but there was no last minute pitchs by the US, it was a pitch by Boeing.
     
  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Embraer Suggests







    Rafale would be selected for F-X2.
    One of the issues that has dominated the F-X2 debate
    is the level of technology transfer. That is also reflected in
    the November 2009 U.S. cable, which states that “Sarkozy
    presented the myth that France is the perfect partner for

    states that do not want to rely on U.S. technology, even

    though the U.S. has agreed in principle to transfer relevant

    technology if Brazil purchases the F-18. However,

    if the Rafale sale goes through, Dassault may have to request

    export-control licenses
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page